U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-29-2019, 05:04 PM
 
3,675 posts, read 1,507,529 times
Reputation: 9598

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
My city is full of dollar store and ethnic grocery store. That is all we have
Ethnic grocery stores can be great- sometimes they have produce at better prices than regular grocery stores. There was one near I worked in Newark, NJ for 10 years and I used to buy part of my groceries there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-31-2019, 12:23 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
30,257 posts, read 66,843,331 times
Reputation: 35781
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Dollar Stores- a Bad Thing?


Yes. Yes they are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 12:36 PM
 
151 posts, read 44,587 times
Reputation: 273
A friend of mine owns a very successful hardware/ furniture, farm supple stores....2 different locations.

He stated a DOLLAR GENERAL store can be profitable with $1 million GROSS revenue per year.

That is not a steep amount of GROSS revenue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2019, 02:35 PM
 
10,467 posts, read 10,904,349 times
Reputation: 7771
Some poor people who aren't on food stamps. (yes there are many) don't need to shop grocery stores because they spend their food money in small increments. Its not so much a matter of frugality but a hand me down type of behavior. And they see nothing wrong with getting fruits and vegetable from cans.

One of my relatives lived with a girl who grew up poor and she would always send him to the corner store because they were out of something like eggs or dish detergent. She didn't know how to shop because it was not something her parents or grandparents ever did. He made over $80,000 a year but she stocked the refrigerator and cupboards in $10.00 - $20.00 increments. Walmart has to compete with these stores and its a win win for the poor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2019, 08:00 AM
 
3,675 posts, read 1,507,529 times
Reputation: 9598
Quote:
Originally Posted by thriftylefty View Post
One of my relatives lived with a girl who grew up poor and she would always send him to the corner store because they were out of something like eggs or dish detergent. She didn't know how to shop because it was not something her parents or grandparents ever did. He made over $80,000 a year but she stocked the refrigerator and cupboards in $10.00 - $20.00 increments. Walmart has to compete with these stores and it's a win win for the poor.
Wow- I know I've been fortunate but I never had to live like that. "Just-in-time" grocery shopping- you don't buy something unless you're completely out of it.

It does remind me of what I saw on my trips to India. Most stores and roadside vendors had boards with colorful little single-use packages of soap, shampoo, etc. I realized that's what people could afford- one package at a time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2019, 10:01 AM
 
10,467 posts, read 10,904,349 times
Reputation: 7771
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Wow- I know I've been fortunate but I never had to live like that. "Just-in-time" grocery shopping- you don't buy something unless you're completely out of it.

It does remind me of what I saw on my trips to India. Most stores and roadside vendors had boards with colorful little single-use packages of soap, shampoo, etc. I realized that's what people could afford- one package at a time.

"Just-in-time" LOL. This relative of mine told this woman that she didn't have shop like that, he told her she could spend $100.00 on groceries if she'd like to. He said she came back with $100.00 of the most random food items he'd ever seen. Like tuna helper but no tuna or wine vinegar for no particular recipe.

Corner stores use to be on every other block where you could shop like that. I knew an old guy who use to work as a "Rack Jobber" up till the seventies. You could buy; one pencil or pen, one handkerchief, or one roll of toilet paper at the corner store. Its more expensive to buy like that but its also expensive to own a car and buy gas and drive to the big retailers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2019, 10:27 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
35,249 posts, read 45,269,076 times
Reputation: 45651
If the "Dollar" stores I've been in put grocery stores out of business then they're pretty pathetic groceries. Unless that grocery only sells strange cookies, potato chips or unpopular soup varieties.

There are those who have to blame someone or something for why a store won't locate somewhere. They can't accept because the area is a ghe......ummm lower socio economic strata.

The SMIBs (Southern Maryland InBreds) get upset at too many Dollar type stores because it gives lie to how wealthy they think the area is (it's not as wealthy as they think). Actually the transplants from the more high class areas of Maryland have tried to disallow them as a class of business.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2019, 10:37 AM
 
6,129 posts, read 1,804,002 times
Reputation: 10721
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
The article below claims that dollar stores (Family Dollar, Dollar Tree, Dollar General) are bad for the poor because they tend to cluster too many in small areas and thus force out grocery stores, which carry fresh foods (They undercut the grocery stores on processed foods and other nonperishables, and the margins on fresh food are razor-thin.) I live in a town with a population of 29,000, just under 10 square miles and there are 6 Dollar st0res that I can think of- it always seemed to be a lot. We do have poorer demographics than other nearby suburbs- higher % who didn't finish college, higher % below the poverty line, etc.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other...Z2F?li=BBnbcA1

And yet- we have 4 traditional grocery stores. All are local chains- not a single Mom and Pop, but not Kroger or Albertson's, either. One Dollar Store is in the same shopping center as a full grocery store.

So... is it that bad to have that many Dollar stores in an area? I see a lot of soccer-Mom types using them for party favors and supplies, cheap toys for the grandkids, etc. I've never been in one.
I'm surprised anyone turns to msn.com for economic insights. It is sort of like National Enquirer.

At any rate, the author of that article, according to his bio, is barely old enough to shave. If he went on a business trip, a grown-up would have to accompany him to rent a car (car rental companies have minimum ages for renters).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2019, 12:48 PM
 
6,934 posts, read 3,133,991 times
Reputation: 21018
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
The article below claims that dollar stores (Family Dollar, Dollar Tree, Dollar General) are bad for the poor because they tend to cluster too many in small areas and thus force out grocery stores, which carry fresh foods (They undercut the grocery stores on processed foods and other nonperishables, and the margins on fresh food are razor-thin.) I live in a town with a population of 29,000, just under 10 square miles and there are 6 Dollar st0res that I can think of- it always seemed to be a lot. We do have poorer demographics than other nearby suburbs- higher % who didn't finish college, higher % below the poverty line, etc.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other...Z2F?li=BBnbcA1

And yet- we have 4 traditional grocery stores. All are local chains- not a single Mom and Pop, but not Kroger or Albertson's, either. One Dollar Store is in the same shopping center as a full grocery store.

So... is it that bad to have that many Dollar stores in an area? I see a lot of soccer-Mom types using them for party favors and supplies, cheap toys for the grandkids, etc. I've never been in one.

That article and the policy shills it quotes have it entirely backwards. Dollar stores go where grocery stores will not, chiefly marginal neighborhoods with low household incomes. Grocery store site selection is not about wishing and guessing. They are about being able to count on a certain amount in sales and margin within a certain geographic radius. Grocery stores make their money on perishables, not on packaged goods.

I mean, if the logic behind the argument actually held, then dollar stores would be crowding out grocery stores everywhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top