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Old 05-10-2020, 12:19 PM
 
3,070 posts, read 4,165,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
Adapt or die. The world doesn't guarantee that what worked for you yesterday will work for you tomorrow.
Fine. Than no complaining about the "loss of community" or the bad attitudes of local retailers who won't donate to your art fair, community theatre, school band trip, high school football team, church mission trip, and etc.
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Old 05-10-2020, 01:00 PM
 
14,143 posts, read 5,831,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teak View Post
Fine. Than no complaining about the "loss of community" or the bad attitudes of local retailers who won't donate to your art fair, community theatre, school band trip, high school football team, church mission trip, and etc.

Awesome. That kind of begging was never equitable or noble. Special interest groups needing funding need to work for it (band team can run car washes and bake sales) or sell something (businesses buy advertising).



There are lots of small businesses that have managed to adapt. In the case of the music store, they need to convince the customer the value they offer justifies the added cost. Maybe offer a free lesson or a free annual tune-up with purchase of a guitar. Or let customers bring their shop-purchased guitars in to try out with amps and effects. Or maybe... match the online price. Point is, as industries and models change you can't just whine about how things have changed, you have to adapt to be successful with the new changes.
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Old 05-11-2020, 04:41 PM
 
585 posts, read 198,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teak View Post
Have any of you ever talked with your "local yokel" retailers?

A music store owner gave me an example of what it is like to be competing with Amazon and other online dealers. She carries quite a bit of sheet music in the store for the various musicians and teachers in the area. Thus, she has a lot of money tied up in inventory.

People come in and browse through her sheet music. And then they stand there and search Amazon to see that they can get the same music for 10% less. But in her store they can leaf through the music books and determine if they really want to order it from Amazon.

Local musicians come in and browse through her guitar inventory. They sit in the climate controlled room and strum away for hours. And then they go home and order that guitar from Amazon or some other online music dealer. She ends up with a slightly used set of guitars that she has to try to sell as brand new.

Church musical directors come and ask her to donate to their church's latest mission trip. And then those musical directors go home and order their guitar strings and sheet music from an online dealer.

This lady probably makes more money giving music lessons than she does with retail sales. But now, even music lessons are moving online.

So go ahead and tell me again how the local yokel retailers have bad attitudes.
it doesn't sound like she has a bad attitude it sounds like she isn't very good at adapting in business. if anything her attitude is way too nice.

i mean what's your point? that amazon and the internet in general have made it tougher to have a small retail store? well that's obvious but like the other poster said adapt or die.

guitars seem like something someone buys once and then maybe buys another one five years later. i'll give you another example of something like that. i'm left handed. as a kid when i got a baseball glove stores naturally carried way more right handed gloves than left handed ones. so i had a very limited choice. i still play baseball as an adult and until a few years ago played in several leagues. in the internet era i can get any glove i wanted in a left handed model. you know what I've never had happen when i went into a store? someone even offer to order me a glove I was looking at in a left handed model. so yes I'm gonna go to the store, find a glove i like that's probably right handed and then go online and find a place that sells the left handed model. to top it off for those who don't know baseball, while most people are right handed, first base is actually easier to play left handed. as a result in the major leagues and it any league i've ever played in a lot of first basemen are left handed throwers. so overall while it makes sense that historically stores stock mostly right handed gloves, when it comes to first basemen's gloves it should be at least 50/50 lefty. but nope if a store has 10 different models of first basemen's gloves you're lucky if they have 2 of those models in stock for lefties.terrible and ignorant merchandise stocking. so yes i'll use the store as a storefront to order online.

The point being-a business needs to figure out way to make customers order from them as opposed to their competition.their competition includes the internet whether they like it or not. last year i needed a new glove. i went to a new independant sporting good store that opened a couple year ago. found a glove i liked , told the guy i was a lefty and he offered to order it for me. he charged a little more than i could get it for online, but i liked his service and he told me if i ever needed it relaced/restrung (which i might need in a few years but probably not) and bought it there they would do it free and i bought it there.

If you can't beat someone on price you better beat them in some other way if you want to keep your customers from buying online.

Last edited by djohnslaw; 05-11-2020 at 04:57 PM..
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Old 05-11-2020, 05:04 PM
 
585 posts, read 198,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teak View Post
Fine. Than no complaining about the "loss of community" or the bad attitudes of local retailers who won't donate to your art fair, community theatre, school band trip, high school football team, church mission trip, and etc.
fair enough. the world changes. and i've never asked a business to donate anything to me or any trips/teams i want to take. at the end of the day while it is nice if they sponsor a team, school trip etc they've always done so because they think they'll make up for the donation via increased business. it's another way to get people to spend their money with them. big businesses do it too.
nike outffiting a college basketball team in free gear is just a bigger version of a small bakery sponsoring a little league team.


i actually to support small businesses when it's reasonable. but they need to give me a reason to.
there is a major supermarket near me i used for a lot of stuff.
there is also a much smaller grocery store nearby. their prices for some things are a little higher. they also have a few things the supermarket doesn't and i like getting sandwiches from their deli. so because they offer me things i can't get in the supermarket, are friendlier, cleaner etc than the supermarkets if I'll pay a little more for things they both sell . but they give me a reason to.

the more expensive an item the bigger that percentage difference in price is in real dollars so a store needs to give an even better reason not to just buy it from their online competitor.
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Old 05-12-2020, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
6,632 posts, read 6,725,151 times
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I’ve been using Amazon since 2001 so almost 20 years. I have averaged around 100 orders per year but the last 4 years I believe over 150 per year. I buy almost everything from Amazon from pool floaties and batteries to protein powder and video games. Business supplies and food items, household stuff, you name it. My entire house is powered by Alexa as well, 10 different Echo devices that control everything from lights and shades to front door and fans and switches. Amazon has usually amazing customer service too.

My best Amazon story ever was ordering a TV for $3,000 and having it not arrive the day it should have, which messed with a cable TV install. I called and told them I wasn’t happy, the lady not only offered me 10% off and I had my case elevated to the VIP support because of my order history, but she got the freight delivery company on the phone and chewed him out with me on the line! She’s like, “Don’t apologize to me, I’m not the customer, you apologize to my customer and you tell him you’re sorry!” So he does, and she extracts a $50 gift card out of him too, then says, “Don’t you ever promise a delivery and not meet your obligations if you want to be an authorized Amazon delivery company do you understand?” This lady was savage hahaha I loved it! I’ve never been treated that well or that importantly by any company let alone a big one.
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Old 05-12-2020, 06:02 AM
 
1,270 posts, read 761,756 times
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I can’t speak to Amazon’s customer service since I don’t personally order from them frequently enough to comment on an experience either way, but good customer service in general is certainly important and a major factor in growing and retaining customers. Big.

Even frugal me will choose to frequent a business with good customer service over cheapest price. Which is why I use to shop at Whole Paycheck but stopped when declining customer service negatively impacted the whole shopping experience. I buy food both out of necessity as well as for an enjoyable experience, so when declining customer service no longer justified the inflated price at WholePaycheck, I stopped shopping there. But this was before Jeff bought it, so maybe it has improved. Dunno, but I’ve found alternatives and won’t go out of my way to return there unless Jeff provides me with a strong enough incentive.

Now, if only he’d buy out Costco and work his customer service magic there. That’s another place I’ve noticed a major decline in customer service - at times downright rude and insulting- and an overall negative shopping experience most of time. No wonder grocery delivery business is taking off, in addition to whatever else customers can buy online.
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Old 05-15-2020, 06:34 PM
 
2,600 posts, read 990,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teak View Post
Have any of you ever talked with your "local yokel" retailers?
Of course I did, and their attitude ranged from “we’ve never heard of you”, or “we only sell to legitimate businesses” as in GTFOH. No, we were not members of the local Chamber but we did have a CO sales tax license, DUNS number, CAGE code etc. One instance I remember was trying to buy some nitric acid from a local oil industry chemical supply house. The yokel sales rep thought I was a meth head and put me on the speaker phone as the other guys in the office yucked it up before they hung up on me. Amazon had what I needed and it was delivered in a couple of days. We bought our mil-spec paints from a supplier in Denver because the local store (same company) didn’t want to bother with “specialty” paints.
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Old 05-28-2020, 09:21 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,888 posts, read 1,026,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonathanLB View Post
My best Amazon story ever was ordering a TV for $3,000 and having it not arrive the day it should have, which messed with a cable TV install. I called and told them I wasn’t happy, the lady not only offered me 10% off and I had my case elevated to the VIP support because of my order history, but she got the freight delivery company on the phone and chewed him out with me on the line! She’s like, “Don’t apologize to me, I’m not the customer, you apologize to my customer and you tell him you’re sorry!” So he does, and she extracts a $50 gift card out of him too, then says, “Don’t you ever promise a delivery and not meet your obligations if you want to be an authorized Amazon delivery company do you understand?” This lady was savage hahaha I loved it! I’ve never been treated that well or that importantly by any company let alone a big one.
Alright, lol - point being (per the thread), Bezos has made no secret of his business plan (relative to the customer, competiton, expansion and so on). All one need do is open their eyes to see where it is today (and where it started from as a bookseller, based in re: his vision of the internet). One must have the vision before the plan or implementation.

That said, individual employees (as in your case) are always going to have a level of 'hit or miss', especially when a company employs over 800,000 people.

Last edited by CorporateCowboy; 05-28-2020 at 09:38 PM..
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