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Old 06-13-2008, 08:20 PM
 
57 posts, read 243,982 times
Reputation: 21

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My wife hasn't had to return to work since she left on maternity leave 2 1/2 years ago. Why? Because of eBay. Treat it like a real business, do your due diligence and research, and exploit a niche. It is possible to have a thriving business with eBay.
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Old 06-13-2008, 09:16 PM
 
692 posts, read 3,141,304 times
Reputation: 357
Buying on E Bay can be frustrating.... It's the only place I have ever dealt with that at times will not accept CASH ie. a good solid money order from Bank of America with an ID # on the check and a seller with all the time in the world to take it to the BAC branch to check it out and get his/her money in Green before shipping anything. Where's the Risk?
Instead they lock you out of Bidding and Buying because they only accept Pay Pal.
DUMB !!
The seller doesn't trust me and I don't trust Pay Pal. Whats wrong with this picture.

I have been in and out of business for 45 years and there ain't a chance in H--L that I wouldn't take CASH.
Just this week alone I was locked out of bidding because of that reason, and the seller lost a chance to get much more money for the items. Thats not to count others like me that might bid.
They won't even bother to look at my feedback record which is outstanding.

WHO SAYS CASH IS KING ?? Not at E Bay.......

Silverfox
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Old 06-14-2008, 10:10 AM
 
28 posts, read 66,026 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverfox View Post
Buying on E Bay can be frustrating.... It's the only place I have ever dealt with that at times will not accept CASH ie. a good solid money order from Bank of America with an ID # on the check and a seller with all the time in the world to take it to the BAC branch to check it out and get his/her money in Green before shipping anything. Where's the Risk?
Instead they lock you out of Bidding and Buying because they only accept Pay Pal.
DUMB !!
The seller doesn't trust me and I don't trust Pay Pal. Whats wrong with this picture.

I have been in and out of business for 45 years and there ain't a chance in H--L that I wouldn't take CASH.
Just this week alone I was locked out of bidding because of that reason, and the seller lost a chance to get much more money for the items. Thats not to count others like me that might bid.
They won't even bother to look at my feedback record which is outstanding.

WHO SAYS CASH IS KING ?? Not at E Bay.......

Silverfox

Did you just want to rant or are you genuinely curious? If you just wanted to rant, I respect that, sometimes you just gotta let it out; if you're really curious I can probably explain why people don't want to take money orders:

a) money orders are not cash. In fact, you read about counterfeit money orders all the time.

b) as you pointed out, why not just take it to a BAC branch? Well, they either don't have one nearby or it's out of the way, and the BAC branch, assuming the seller isn't a customer at BAC, will charge you for cashing it there. Not everyone banks at BAC.

c) it slows things down. With PP, you get paid, you generate an automatic shipping label, things are out the door in no time. With a money order, there's the extra hassle of taking it to the bank and (if you're selling lots of stuff) keeping track of each payment, making a label, etc. If you're selling five items and only one person pays with a money order, it's not hard to keep track of things. If you're selling two hundred items and everyone pays with a money order, it's much harder to keep track of things compared to PP.

d) it seems that you're a reasonable person who is in no hurry, and will give the seller enough time to verify the legitimacy of the money order. Unfortunately, many people are very impatient, so if they send a money order, they expect their item in no time and will be dissatisfied and will leave bad feedback if they feel they didn't get it soon enough.

Bottom line, b/t the hassle, potential fraud, and the potential for buyer dissatisfaction from delayed shipping, most sellers don't want to bother.
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Old 06-14-2008, 10:50 AM
 
692 posts, read 3,141,304 times
Reputation: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by another guy View Post
Did you just want to rant or are you genuinely curious? If you just wanted to rant, I respect that, sometimes you just gotta let it out; if you're really curious I can probably explain why people don't want to take money orders:

a) money orders are not cash. In fact, you read about counterfeit money orders all the time.

b) as you pointed out, why not just take it to a BAC branch? Well, they either don't have one nearby or it's out of the way, and the BAC branch, assuming the seller isn't a customer at BAC, will charge you for cashing it there. Not everyone banks at BAC.

c) it slows things down. With PP, you get paid, you generate an automatic shipping label, things are out the door in no time. With a money order, there's the extra hassle of taking it to the bank and (if you're selling lots of stuff) keeping track of each payment, making a label, etc. If you're selling five items and only one person pays with a money order, it's not hard to keep track of things. If you're selling two hundred items and everyone pays with a money order, it's much harder to keep track of things compared to PP.

d) it seems that you're a reasonable person who is in no hurry, and will give the seller enough time to verify the legitimacy of the money order. Unfortunately, many people are very impatient, so if they send a money order, they expect their item in no time and will be dissatisfied and will leave bad feedback if they feel they didn't get it soon enough.

Bottom line, b/t the hassle, potential fraud, and the potential for buyer dissatisfaction from delayed shipping, most sellers don't want to bother.
Yes I do want to Rant but only on a legitimate basis.

Thank you for taking the time to explain the other side.

We just had a local news story in Seattle on a rip off by Pay Pal to one of their seller/customers regarding a scam. The seller lost because of Pay Pals policy and they put a 2 minute story on the news two days in a row warning E Bay sellers of this ridiculoius Pay Pal Policy decision. It soured me and I'm not even a seller.
The second news cast said that after the news station contacted Pay Pal and put in on the news that they changed their mind and refunded the seller his $400.
So much for Pay Pal.
The seller of course then replied I'm thru with them...Take it for what it's worth.
Anyway I do understand better from your explanation but I'm still not happy about losing out on bidding and I refuse to join Pay Pal so I guess it's a standoff and both the sellers and I will lose as a result.
So be it.
Grrrrrrr...

P.S. to explain my feelings...I come from another generation where a hand shake was as good as GOLD.
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Old 06-14-2008, 12:05 PM
 
28 posts, read 66,026 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverfox View Post
Yes I do want to Rant but only on a legitimate basis.

Thank you for taking the time to explain the other side.

We just had a local news story in Seattle on a rip off by Pay Pal to one of their seller/customers regarding a scam. The seller lost because of Pay Pals policy and they put a 2 minute story on the news two days in a row warning E Bay sellers of this ridiculoius Pay Pal Policy decision. It soured me and I'm not even a seller.
The second news cast said that after the news station contacted Pay Pal and put in on the news that they changed their mind and refunded the seller his $400.
So much for Pay Pal.
The seller of course then replied I'm thru with them...Take it for what it's worth.
Anyway I do understand better from your explanation but I'm still not happy about losing out on bidding and I refuse to join Pay Pal so I guess it's a standoff and both the sellers and I will lose as a result.
So be it.
Grrrrrrr...

P.S. to explain my feelings...I come from another generation where a hand shake was as good as GOLD.
I totally respect your thinking. And I agree, I wish we didn't have to worry so much about scammers. You're really not all that safe with PP, either, that's definitely true (both as a seller and a buyer). Ebay/Paypal just really like telling you that you are.

I had a friend who was scammed out of $1300 with Paypal when he bought something on Ebay. Seller had 100% feedback, but the account was either hi-jacked or the seller went bad. He paid $1500, thinking that he was protected by Ebay/Paypal. Turns out that protection was only good for $200 in this case (sometimes it's good for $2000) so he was out $1300. If he had known where to look, he would have known that protection was only so good, but Ebay and Paypal like to tell you that it's oh-so-safe shopping on Ebay/Paypal.

As a seller, if you don't follow certain rules (which can often inconvenience the buyer), you're also putting yourself at risk.

The biggest problems are: a) scammers and b) Ebay/Paypal are not willing to devote the resources necessary to police transactions that go bad. They'd rather establish some rules beforehand and go strictly by those rules (it's cheaper for them that way). Of course, if you're a sophisticated scammer, whether you're a buyer or seller, you can game those rules.

If you fund your Paypal payments via a credit card (which Paypal discourages), you might have fairly good protection, but it really depends on the terms in your credit card agreement.
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Old 06-15-2008, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Florida
23,170 posts, read 26,179,590 times
Reputation: 27914
Selling on eBay these days, is like crossing a mine field.
Some will make it ...some will get hurt
Go to the discussion boards ....read, read, read.
Then decide whether or not it's the best thing for you to do.
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Old 06-15-2008, 03:05 PM
 
69,368 posts, read 64,081,664 times
Reputation: 9383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsey_Mcfarren View Post
WOW, I have alot of books I would like to sell as well. You must do a really good business.

SO are you going to tell us what sites you use?
Half.com which is owned by ebay, amazon, alibris.com, abebooks.com, and a few small ones, and yes, I do a really good business and carry millions of items.
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Old 06-15-2008, 03:15 PM
 
69,368 posts, read 64,081,664 times
Reputation: 9383
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverfox View Post
Yes I do want to Rant but only on a legitimate basis.

Thank you for taking the time to explain the other side.

We just had a local news story in Seattle on a rip off by Pay Pal to one of their seller/customers regarding a scam. The seller lost because of Pay Pals policy and they put a 2 minute story on the news two days in a row warning E Bay sellers of this ridiculoius Pay Pal Policy decision. It soured me and I'm not even a seller.
The second news cast said that after the news station contacted Pay Pal and put in on the news that they changed their mind and refunded the seller his $400.
So much for Pay Pal.
The seller of course then replied I'm thru with them...Take it for what it's worth.
Anyway I do understand better from your explanation but I'm still not happy about losing out on bidding and I refuse to join Pay Pal so I guess it's a standoff and both the sellers and I will lose as a result.
So be it.
Grrrrrrr...

P.S. to explain my feelings...I come from another generation where a hand shake was as good as GOLD.
Where people make their mistake with paypal, is they fund their transactions using cash in their paypal account. You need to fund ALL transactions using a credit card, that way you not only have a paypal guarantee, but a credit card guarantee to go back on if paypal rules in your favor.
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Old 06-15-2008, 03:28 PM
 
Location: in my mind
2,743 posts, read 14,291,422 times
Reputation: 1627
I sold on eBay for 8 years and made the equivalent of a part time job. I ventured out to do it "full time" and did so for an entire year, and while I didn't get rich, I paid the bills. I made as much as I'd have made with a lower wage full time job... which was fine by me because I didn't have to 'go' to work. I was a power seller and all that jazz. It let me provide for the kids after my divorce without having to worry about child care costs.

I did work very hard though, and being successful is like any business... it requires self-discipline, common sense, and organizational skills. And those are just the BASIC qualities needed to succeed. You have to find your niche and then KNOW your niche. I saw so many sellers in the clothing category trying to sell their used Target or walmart clothing and then wondering why they weren't doing well......!

I quit and took a "normal" full time job because I didn't like the uncertainty. No matter what your niche, there are slow times on eBay and if you aren't prepared for that AND you're counting on the income to feed your family you'll be unpleasantly shocked. I made enough to make ends meet but not enough to save money for the "slow times"... so the slow times were very painful for me and I ended up living on credit cards and looking for another job.

So anyway, it can be done, just be aware of the risks as with ANY business. I'm currently out of a job (layoff) and am going to be selling some of my leftover ebay inventory to help out with the bills. I'd love to do it again full time but I think I'd need to find a second "niche" market, or a better one, next time around. ( I dealt mostly in women's extreme high end designer clothing and my passion was for selling vintage items, mostly clothing and accessories from the 30's, 40's, and 50's)

Oh and I agree with all the reasons given for not accepting money orders. When I was a full time seller, I would accept money orders on occasion but only from established buyers and with strict guidelines. I found that even "good" buyers would take FOREVER to mail the money order, and like the previous poster said, many were impatient and expected the item to be mailed out the day after THEY mailed the money order. I operated everything from the house.. the PayPal payments came in and the same funds were used to purchase online postage, packages were handed directly to my mail carrier... there was no need to go to the bank, and adding in extra steps did take a good chunk of time out of the process. It's highly unlikely that any seller dealing in higher volume has "all the time in the world".... I was having to work on my eBay business way more than if I'd been working a 9-5 job.
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Old 06-16-2008, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,883 posts, read 5,888,756 times
Reputation: 2762
I've fooled around with ebay as a buyer and seller.

-I think you have to take it seriously. I think alot of people are fooling themselves/deluding themselves on there.

Over charging on shipping or trying to trick you. By saying one thing in the title and then the description is another thing. That doesn't inspire much confidence. Why would you want to purposely rip people off the first time they buy from you?

If you had a hot dog stand on the corner and you said one thing and tried to do another. Or try to trick people or decieve them, you aren't going to last very long. It's such common sense, almost embarrassingly simple.

-You have to optimize and streamline things, or you'll be on there forever. I don't see how people have time for it....ebay radio, ebay workshops, ebay this.

-Some categories I'd never want to compete on. Like DVD's or electronics. Why compete against Walmart or Best Buy?

-If you want to make extra money, it has to come from a skill or knowledge. not because ebays fees are X. And if they go up a little bit, you're out of luck.

-Treat it like you would a table at a swap meet or if you a hotdog stand. You don't need tricks or gimmicks.

Your listing should offer service to your buyer and make a complete case for the item. That's all they want. The sellers that have really complicated terms, I just don't get. You wouldn't do it in real life selling something.

-Customer service and negatives. Handle it the way you would if you worked at a restaurant. Some people let problems drag on for weeks or months. That isn't a real business.

If you went to a restaurant and your food wasn't cooked the right way, they'd fix it right there. Most buyers are honest. Maybe 1 out of 50. 1 out of 100 you have problems with.

-And you have to be aware of your time. That's whats valuable.
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