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Old 04-15-2009, 01:43 PM
 
Location: In my view finder.....
8,520 posts, read 14,601,488 times
Reputation: 8079

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Only answer if you have done this..... :-)


I am starting a new service business. What kind is not important. Essentially I'll be marketing my service to CEO's/Biz owners of businesses that generate $10 million to $50 million in annual revenues(50 or more employees).


I was thinking of marketing my service using the following tools:


1-Article publishing in my target market( trade journals)

2a-Press releases in my target market offering my "advisory guide". It's a no cost guide(white paper) that explains the options my target market has when it comes to needing the service. Essentialy they'll be directed to a one page mini website that has an opt-in box. Once they submit theor name and email address they'll get access to the download page which allows them to download the free report.


2b- Public relations.....offering myself as a expert/resource to journalists. And responding to the leads I get. On average I get about 20 leads a month from journalists looking for quotable knowledge on my subject.


3-And speaking engagements..speaking to my target market at the many industry associations in which they are aprt of.


Again if you've never marketed a service business please do not respond.
Also please do not mention how "hard" something is to do. I am not interested in how difficult/easy something is. What matters is that it works.



Thanks.....



R
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Old 04-16-2009, 08:15 AM
 
11,308 posts, read 46,420,575 times
Reputation: 15300
Well, yes, I've marketed a service business to a target group. Did pretty well with it, too ... after some years of trial and error to see which avenues worked best to reach my clients effectively for the lowest cost.

But I'll have to differ with you on the approach vs the service you're offering issue ... what service you're selling will greatly affect what will be the best approach to marketing it to your target clients.

At this point, it sounds like you've pretty well decided upon a few choices. All I can say is give them a try ... and see what results you get.

Have fun with your business.
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Old 04-16-2009, 07:03 PM
 
Location: In my view finder.....
8,520 posts, read 14,601,488 times
Reputation: 8079
SS,

you have a valid point. It does make a difference as it relates to the type of service. That is a very important variable.


R


Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
Well, yes, I've marketed a service business to a target group. Did pretty well with it, too ... after some years of trial and error to see which avenues worked best to reach my clients effectively for the lowest cost.

But I'll have to differ with you on the approach vs the service you're offering issue ... what service you're selling will greatly affect what will be the best approach to marketing it to your target clients.

At this point, it sounds like you've pretty well decided upon a few choices. All I can say is give them a try ... and see what results you get.

Have fun with your business.
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Old 04-17-2009, 03:02 PM
 
Location: NW San Antonio
2,960 posts, read 8,972,444 times
Reputation: 3246
Your product that you propose to market is the key here. To give you pointers on what I've done is a moot point, as the other person put it. You've decided on your product/service and I would gather you're looking for more input. Be glad to give you some, but it's hard to do without a little more input. Mine was Web site, local listing, and good word of mouth from happy customers.
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Old 04-17-2009, 08:15 PM
Status: "Faith over Fear" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: North Central Florida
6,122 posts, read 6,739,757 times
Reputation: 3836
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinsativ View Post
Mine was Web site, local listing, and good word of mouth from happy customers.

I do yacht management. So I started with the "facilitators" first. Got to the Yacht brokers selling the boat. Their recomendation gets you to the target customer. Sell the service direct, then make certain you "perform", go the extra mile...the word of mouth is golden...like a snowball headed downhill.... I havent had to place an ad, or hand anyone a business card in over a decade.....
Best to you in your venture....
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Old 04-17-2009, 09:35 PM
 
Location: In my view finder.....
8,520 posts, read 14,601,488 times
Reputation: 8079
Thanks for all of the advice.....



R
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Old 04-19-2009, 12:58 AM
 
3,853 posts, read 11,986,553 times
Reputation: 2522
It really depends on the service.

I think best is word of mouth.

I am going into the accounting biz (CPA sooner or later) so right now i am building my network of friends on facebook. I tell everyone that I am preparing for the CPA, they might be future clients. The accounting profession is just one of those fields that relies heavily on trust so I don't think many people are going to be interested in a CPA they don't know directly.
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Old 04-19-2009, 10:06 AM
 
19,290 posts, read 58,536,892 times
Reputation: 35162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron. View Post
Only answer if you have done this..... :-)


I am starting a new service business. What kind is not important. Essentially I'll be marketing my service to CEO's/Biz owners of businesses that generate $10 million to $50 million in annual revenues(50 or more employees).


I was thinking of marketing my service using the following tools:


1-Article publishing in my target market( trade journals)

2a-Press releases in my target market offering my "advisory guide". It's a no cost guide(white paper) that explains the options my target market has when it comes to needing the service. Essentialy they'll be directed to a one page mini website that has an opt-in box. Once they submit theor name and email address they'll get access to the download page which allows them to download the free report.


2b- Public relations.....offering myself as a expert/resource to journalists. And responding to the leads I get. On average I get about 20 leads a month from journalists looking for quotable knowledge on my subject.


3-And speaking engagements..speaking to my target market at the many industry associations in which they are aprt of.


Again if you've never marketed a service business please do not respond.
Also please do not mention how "hard" something is to do. I am not interested in how difficult/easy something is. What matters is that it works.



Thanks.....
R
I guess marketing and ongoing supporting of software and supplies fits your criteria. Aside from #3, those all seem like oblique "hope they'll notice" forms of promotion.

In a slightly different area of the industry I have supported, there is a man who has done almost exactly what you have described. His reports are very good - almost over the head of his target audience - and his presence is everywhere. What is fascinating is to watch his booth at the trade shows and see EVERYONE pass him by. While his intensive marketing keeps him available, I think it has had a counterproductive effect. He appears to be too available, too pontificating, and less a "service" provider than a know-it-all.

One of my competitors gained a major market share over others with more resources by doing something surprisingly simple and opposite of this. He found a nearly perfect salesman that was able to tout his service and do all of the glad-handing front work, while freeing him to work on the actual service and product.

There is a great temptation to be a one-man show. I'm guilty of that myself. The people who have a better chance of business growth that is sustainable understand when to farm out work and supervise.
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Old 04-19-2009, 12:20 PM
 
Location: In my view finder.....
8,520 posts, read 14,601,488 times
Reputation: 8079
Selling a high end service is not like selling a product. Nor do you set up a booth at a trade show......most people that I know that market a service do the things I have laid out. They don't hire a saleman. Do dentists hire salesmen to sell their service? I think not.

It's a very personal service and it has to be marketed as such. When selling personal services you have to spend more time educating your prospect than trying to sell them something.




Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I guess marketing and ongoing supporting of software and supplies fits your criteria. Aside from #3, those all seem like oblique "hope they'll notice" forms of promotion.

In a slightly different area of the industry I have supported, there is a man who has done almost exactly what you have described. His reports are very good - almost over the head of his target audience - and his presence is everywhere. What is fascinating is to watch his booth at the trade shows and see EVERYONE pass him by. While his intensive marketing keeps him available, I think it has had a counterproductive effect. He appears to be too available, too pontificating, and less a "service" provider than a know-it-all.

One of my competitors gained a major market share over others with more resources by doing something surprisingly simple and opposite of this. He found a nearly perfect salesman that was able to tout his service and do all of the glad-handing front work, while freeing him to work on the actual service and product.

There is a great temptation to be a one-man show. I'm guilty of that myself. The people who have a better chance of business growth that is sustainable understand when to farm out work and supervise.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
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