U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 09-03-2010, 12:03 PM
 
81 posts, read 274,372 times
Reputation: 59

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
Cal Poly San Luis Obispo better academically than UC Santa Barbara or UC Santa Cruz? Not a chance. Cal Poly is a state school; it doesn't hold a candle to any of the UC schools, including UC Riverside. (The city of SLO is prettier than Riverside, though.)

And SLO attracts a completely different type of person than Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz or Monterey.
The GPA and SAT scores of enrolled Cal Poly students (and the admission rate) is much stronger than UC Riverside. Cal Poly is about on par with the mid tier of the UC system (UCSB, UCI, and UCD).

For example (entering class of 2008)

UC Riverside: 3.42 GPA, 1051 SAT score
Cal Poly: 3.78 GPA, 1200 SAT score
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-03-2010, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 9,179,353 times
Reputation: 1802
I like San Luis Obispo. It sits in a little valley with mountains surrounding it. The university is well-known for its agriculture programs. It is close to Morro Bay and some nice beaches [Avila, Pismo] and not far from San Simeon\ Hearst Castle. When a person leaves Paso Robles or Atascadero in the extreme afternoon heat driving on the 101 freeway it is a big relief crossing the mountains into San Luis Obispo.

But San Luis Obispo isn't on the Pacific Ocean [though it is close] so it doesn't have the charm of Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz or Monterey. In some ways San Luis Obispo reminds me of Santa Cruz; about the same size with very large universities and a college town feel. But Santa Cruz also has a great beach\ boardwalk. Monterey and Santa Barbara are tourist areas with incredible beauty that includes the ocean.

San Luis Obispo isn't in the same category as Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz or Monterey but it has its own charm and is a very attractive area for retirees.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2010, 11:03 PM
 
4,883 posts, read 11,726,405 times
Reputation: 1318
Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
I like San Luis Obispo. It sits in a little valley with mountains surrounding it. The university is well-known for its agriculture programs. It is close to Morro Bay and some nice beaches [Avila, Pismo] and not far from San Simeon\ Hearst Castle. When a person leaves Paso Robles or Atascadero in the extreme afternoon heat driving on the 101 freeway it is a big relief crossing the mountains into San Luis Obispo.

But San Luis Obispo isn't on the Pacific Ocean [though it is close] so it doesn't have the charm of Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz or Monterey. In some ways San Luis Obispo reminds me of Santa Cruz; about the same size with very large universities and a college town feel. But Santa Cruz also has a great beach\ boardwalk. Monterey and Santa Barbara are tourist areas with incredible beauty that includes the ocean.

San Luis Obispo isn't in the same category as Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz or Monterey but it has its own charm and is a very attractive area for retirees.
I think it's in par with Santa Cruz and Santa Barbara because of the colleges, but different from Santa Cruz, Monterey, and Santa Barbara in that it is less touristy because it's not a beach city. SLO is known for it's mountains, farmers market, and college. All four cities have vibrant and touristy downtowns. That is their one similarity.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2010, 10:44 AM
 
230 posts, read 577,032 times
Reputation: 435
I think it's impossible to separate SLO from its surrounding cities -- maybe that's part of the charm. I' lived in the area for 17 years, and in several of the towns in the area. SLO itself as a town, is not the main draw, it's the package. The "Central Coast" as local call SLO County, is a micro-state with beaches, forest, ranches, retail areas, agriculture, wine, lakes. It's so diverse. If SLO was on it's own, like Hollister, it would be unremarkable (no offense to Hollister!) It's the proximity and diversity of experiences that makes it more enticing and memorable.

There is something indescribable about the area that draws people in. Santa Barbara is amazing, and gorgeous, as is Santa Cruz, and Monterey, but they are fairly easy to grasp in one visit. They are cities/towns on the beach with a California/Spanish flair. SLO is a collection of towns around the town. Frankly, I love that entire stretch of 101/1 from Malibu all the way up to Half Moon Bay... so perhaps I'm biased!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2010, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 9,179,353 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by trixie09 View Post
I think it's impossible to separate SLO from its surrounding cities -- maybe that's part of the charm. I' lived in the area for 17 years, and in several of the towns in the area. SLO itself as a town, is not the main draw, it's the package. The "Central Coast" as local call SLO County, is a micro-state with beaches, forest, ranches, retail areas, agriculture, wine, lakes. It's so diverse. If SLO was on it's own, like Hollister, it would be unremarkable (no offense to Hollister!) It's the proximity and diversity of experiences that makes it more enticing and memorable.

There is something indescribable about the area that draws people in. Santa Barbara is amazing, and gorgeous, as is Santa Cruz, and Monterey, but they are fairly easy to grasp in one visit. They are cities/towns on the beach with a California/Spanish flair. SLO is a collection of towns around the town. Frankly, I love that entire stretch of 101/1 from Malibu all the way up to Half Moon Bay... so perhaps I'm biased!
I think you could make the same argument for Monterey. The combination of Pacific Grove, Carmel and Carmel Valley [also Seaside to a lesser extent] make the Monterey Peninsula a very attractive region. Of-course the Monterey county coastline down to Big Sur and eventually San Luis Obispo county is probably the most scenic section of the California coastline [if not the nation]. Monterey county combined with San Luis Obispo county make up what is referred to as the "Gold Coast" of California. They share the Salinas Valley and the Santa Lucia mts\ Los Padres national forest, San Antonio & Nacimiento lakes, etc. A gorgeous part of California.

Santa Cruz sort of stands on its own but has some small towns surrounding. Capitola is a real gem; Aptos and Soquel are also nice. Santa Barbara is also basically the main focus with Goleta, Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria nice beach communities.

Agree that San Luis Obispo is a string of communities that make up a very attractive region; actually all the way down to Santa Maria.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2010, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
6,448 posts, read 14,160,689 times
Reputation: 7489
Quote:
Originally Posted by trixie09 View Post
I think it's impossible to separate SLO from its surrounding cities -- maybe that's part of the charm. I' lived in the area for 17 years, and in several of the towns in the area. SLO itself as a town, is not the main draw, it's the package. The "Central Coast" as local call SLO County, is a micro-state with beaches, forest, ranches, retail areas, agriculture, wine, lakes. It's so diverse. If SLO was on it's own, like Hollister, it would be unremarkable (no offense to Hollister!) It's the proximity and diversity of experiences that makes it more enticing and memorable.

There is something indescribable about the area that draws people in. Santa Barbara is amazing, and gorgeous, as is Santa Cruz, and Monterey, but they are fairly easy to grasp in one visit. They are cities/towns on the beach with a California/Spanish flair. SLO is a collection of towns around the town. Frankly, I love that entire stretch of 101/1 from Malibu all the way up to Half Moon Bay... so perhaps I'm biased!
Great points Trixie, very well said! To really fully experience San Luis Obispo one needs to go beyond downtown. It's really more about a county experience. So for example check out the coast at Montana de Oro.








Take a drive through the foothills during Spring.




Visit the Carrizo Plain.






And more...

Derek
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2010, 12:13 AM
 
4,883 posts, read 11,726,405 times
Reputation: 1318
I was just wondering how Monterey is on the radar. It's not as big as SLO. It still has a good reputation. I guess a city being at 50,000 population is not that big a deal anymore. I always remembered a city being at 50,000 population a big thing because a city becomes an enlistment city and some retailers will not go in a city unless it has that 50k mark. SLO and other cities have bypassed that though. SLO now has Sprint store and has had World Market and other stores for a while that usually only locate in an area with 50k population.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2010, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,412 posts, read 9,179,353 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I was just wondering how Monterey is on the radar. It's not as big as SLO. It still has a good reputation. I guess a city being at 50,000 population is not that big a deal anymore. I always remembered a city being at 50,000 population a big thing because a city becomes an enlistment city and some retailers will not go in a city unless it has that 50k mark. SLO and other cities have bypassed that though. SLO now has Sprint store and has had World Market and other stores for a while that usually only locate in an area with 50k population.
I'm too lazy to look it up but do you know what the population figures are for San Luis Obispo and the surrounding towns? Do you think Monterey lost population when Fort Ord was closed many years ago?

On another subject, I think it would be great if the "Central Coast" could have its own forum but maybe there aren't enough posters to keep it going. It could include Santa Cruz, San Benito, Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties. Or maybe open it up to include all of the Central California; the Central Coast, San Joaquin Valley and the Sierra's from south of Lake Tahoe to Mammoth.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2010, 10:44 AM
 
4,883 posts, read 11,726,405 times
Reputation: 1318
Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
I'm too lazy to look it up but do you know what the population figures are for San Luis Obispo and the surrounding towns? Do you think Monterey lost population when Fort Ord was closed many years ago?

On another subject, I think it would be great if the "Central Coast" could have its own forum but maybe there aren't enough posters to keep it going. It could include Santa Cruz, San Benito, Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties. Or maybe open it up to include all of the Central California; the Central Coast, San Joaquin Valley and the Sierra's from south of Lake Tahoe to Mammoth.
SLO has it's own MSA and within city limits are 45,000 population and the county controls 5,000 population outside SLO"s city limits. Not to mention you have 6,000 students living in dorms. SLO is practically at 5,000 population.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2011, 06:53 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo
4 posts, read 10,097 times
Reputation: 13
One of the most energetic communities on Central Coast(college town). Liberal bent culture, outdoor activities abound. Lots of hiking trails. Bike friendly with bike lanes on most roads. Slow growth (<2% year) keeps real estate values higher(good and bad). I lived in Santa Cruz and Monteray and find that San Luis Obispo isn't as crowded, nor as invaded by tourists(although Pismo Beach, just south of SLO is highly impacted by beach goers and ATV enthusiasts).
Very scenic. Drier warmer weather than other Central Coast cities. One downside;Jobs are scarce.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top