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Old 05-16-2011, 09:55 PM
 
19 posts, read 39,839 times
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These are all wonderful places and here are my perceived differences:
Santa Barbara - Luxury, Small Urban, Hip, Affluent, Beautiful
Santa Cruz - Hippie, Mild Weather, good job market, liberal
SLO - laid back, mostly conservative but still "california conservative" but odd spread of demographics Lots of college students and then retirees... fewer young families with kids in 30s and 40s. Not a great town for singles.
Monterey- don't know much about this area except cold, foggy, retirees, great aquarium. scenic drive to get there.
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Old 05-19-2011, 03:05 PM
 
4,883 posts, read 11,712,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandpoet View Post
One of the most energetic communities on Central Coast(college town). Liberal bent culture, outdoor activities abound. Lots of hiking trails. Bike friendly with bike lanes on most roads. Slow growth (<2% year) keeps real estate values higher(good and bad). I lived in Santa Cruz and Monteray and find that San Luis Obispo isn't as crowded, nor as invaded by tourists(although Pismo Beach, just south of SLO is highly impacted by beach goers and ATV enthusiasts).
Very scenic. Drier warmer weather than other Central Coast cities. One downside;Jobs are scarce.
SLO is built in the foothill mountains while Monterey and Santa Cruz border the beach. So we have more room.
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Old 05-19-2011, 03:22 PM
 
4,883 posts, read 11,712,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tattoobarbie View Post
These are all wonderful places and here are my perceived differences:
Santa Barbara - Luxury, Small Urban, Hip, Affluent, Beautiful
Santa Cruz - Hippie, Mild Weather, good job market, liberal
SLO - laid back, mostly conservative but still "california conservative" but odd spread of demographics Lots of college students and then retirees... fewer young families with kids in 30s and 40s. Not a great town for singles.
Monterey- don't know much about this area except cold, foggy, retirees, great aquarium. scenic drive to get there.
I agree with alot of what you said, here is my summary:

Santa Barbara-spanish adobe and dense urban downtown, high-end shopping, warm beachy, liberal

Santa Cruz- counter culture (hippy downtown), Santa Cruz Boardwalk, mild beachy, liberal

San Luis Obispo-historic looking downtown, mountainy, conservative

Monterey-small un-lively downtown, Cannery Row, high-end shopping, liberal, foggy beach
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:23 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo
4 posts, read 10,084 times
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Default Slo

Quote:
Originally Posted by tattoobarbie View Post
These are all wonderful places and here are my perceived differences:
Santa Barbara - Luxury, Small Urban, Hip, Affluent, Beautiful
Santa Cruz - Hippie, Mild Weather, good job market, liberal
SLO - laid back, mostly conservative but still "california conservative" but odd spread of demographics Lots of college students and then retirees... fewer young families with kids in 30s and 40s. Not a great town for singles.
Monterey- don't know much about this area except cold, foggy, retirees, great aquarium. scenic drive to get there.
Tatoo

Lived in Santa Cruz and agree with your observation.
Have lived in SLO County since 1991, aingle 11 of 20. Dated 8-10 women met at the Graduate, Beach and health clubs. Strangely enough, I married a NYC woman. I found it extremely inviting as a single person in my 30's and 40's. Easier, no doubt, if you are college age.
Santa Barbara-Old money, luxury and predominately conservative.
Monterey-agree on your take.

Dave
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Old 07-09-2011, 06:24 PM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo
4 posts, read 10,084 times
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Cal poly is a high caliber engineering and horticulture school. Horticulture rivals Michigan State. Any one that says UC's are superior to all State Universities is elitist and inaccurate when specific disciplines are compared across the state.manta State Universities have professors from all the Ivy League schools, making the quality of instruction equal to many UC's. I asked a few profs why choose a State University school in the San Joaquin Valley rather than a higher profile UC, Stanford, etc. And they replied that the pay was comparable, but the cost of living was lower. Having graduated from a State University with a business degree, I was a CEO at 35 you and started my own business at 53. Most success goes beyond education. Intelligence, drive and passion have provided me a PHD in common-sense. Work hard, stay the course and you will achieve most anything you endeavor to pursue. What Ivy league schools give a student goes beyond quality education, providing a network of collegues that used effectively, may propel one to the highest levels in their career sooner than graduates of smaller State schools. Most students in Ivy league schools aren't on Pell grants or drive 10 year old VW's.
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Old 07-09-2011, 08:11 PM
 
1,077 posts, read 2,951,689 times
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Let's be honest, if you have the means, you can't go wrong with any one of them.
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Old 07-09-2011, 08:32 PM
 
9,965 posts, read 15,981,444 times
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All four Central Coast towns feel sort of unique to me... The main difference of San Luis Obispo, is that due to it's relative isolation, it feels a little more laidback(and slighly more conservative) than you get in Santa Cruz and Santa Barbara.

Santa Cruz, is heavily influenced by the Bay Area--although the natives in Santa Cruz resent it to some degree and people in the Bay Area don't consider Santa Cruz to be part of the Bay Area. But it's close enough to be a commuter destination to Silicon Valley, get hordes of tourists from over the hill, and so on which makes it feel a little more hectic sometimes. And you have much more of the Bay Area attitude and also more crime and drugs than some of the other areas of the Central Coast.

Santa Barbara likewise, feels a little more wealthy, but also has the influence of the huge LA metro an hour away. And with UCSB along with the surf culture vibe and a kind of new agey culture in some ways, it feels like the start of Southern California without much of the worst excesses of urban sprawl and development that's come to signify most of SoCal.

San Luis Obispo on the other hand feels relatively quiet for the most part. It kind of feels like the most typical in comparison to much of the Central Coast. Pretty pastoral farmland, rolling hills, a mix of mission-style architecture downtown, not far to the coast, and it has a setting that kind of represents the Central Coast. The people I knew who went to CalPoly seemed to be a little more serious with their studies and down-to-earth than those I know who ended up at UCSB or UC Santa Cruz.

Monterey is the other famous area of the Central Coast, and to me it feels fairly different from the rest. Maybe it's the location as well, or the proximity to Carmel/Big Sur, but growing up in Santa Cruz there wasn't something that just felt different in the Monterey Peninsula. Maybe it's just the mix of wealth and the military element(Fort Ord in the past, but also the Naval Graduate School today), but there was something about the area that seemed a little more established than Santa Cruz. Also the slightly colder, foggier weather and tons of cypress trees kind of just gives it a different coastal vibe.
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Old 07-10-2011, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
6,448 posts, read 14,134,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
All four Central Coast towns feel sort of unique to me... The main difference of San Luis Obispo, is that due to it's relative isolation, it feels a little more laidback(and slighly more conservative) than you get in Santa Cruz and Santa Barbara.

Santa Cruz, is heavily influenced by the Bay Area--although the natives in Santa Cruz resent it to some degree and people in the Bay Area don't consider Santa Cruz to be part of the Bay Area. But it's close enough to be a commuter destination to Silicon Valley, get hordes of tourists from over the hill, and so on which makes it feel a little more hectic sometimes. And you have much more of the Bay Area attitude and also more crime and drugs than some of the other areas of the Central Coast.
Yes, Santa Cruz feels the most like the Bay area in comparsion to the rest of the Central Coast beach towns. In driving up from Monterey I immediately notice the increase in traffic and more frantic pace overall. This is the border of the Central Coast. However some locals would like to think of themselves more a part of the Bay area or NorCal coast. It has a strong Surf Culture along with some local prejudice toward outsiders. Some find this more distasteful than others as described in part here.

Quote:
Santa Barbara likewise, feels a little more wealthy, but also has the influence of the huge LA metro an hour away. And with UCSB along with the surf culture vibe and a kind of new agey culture in some ways, it feels like the start of Southern California without much of the worst excesses of urban sprawl and development that's come to signify most of SoCal.
SB tries to be different from LA and is in some ways. But it is still heavily influenced by the SoCal. It's the first place I hit in driving down from the north that feels like LA. And this quickly increases as one approaches the SF Valley.

Quote:
San Luis Obispo on the other hand feels relatively quiet for the most part. It kind of feels like the most typical in comparison to much of the Central Coast. Pretty pastoral farmland, rolling hills, a mix of mission-style architecture downtown, not far to the coast, and it has a setting that kind of represents the Central Coast. The people I knew who went to CalPoly seemed to be a little more serious with their studies and down-to-earth than those I know who ended up at UCSB or UC Santa Cruz.
SLO seems like a layed back college town smack dab in the middle of LA and the Bay area. There aren't a lot of jobs there and an overabundance of 20 somethings hanging on to that college lifestyle even post college. If someone finds their niche its a very nice place to live.

Quote:
Monterey is the other famous area of the Central Coast, and to me it feels fairly different from the rest. Maybe it's the location as well, or the proximity to Carmel/Big Sur, but growing up in Santa Cruz there wasn't something that just felt different in the Monterey Peninsula. Maybe it's just the mix of wealth and the military element(Fort Ord in the past, but also the Naval Graduate School today), but there was something about the area that seemed a little more established than Santa Cruz. Also the slightly colder, foggier weather and tons of cypress trees kind of just gives it a different coastal vibe.
Monterey is just far enough away from the Bay area to not be like the Bay. The pace of life is slower. Traffic isn't too bad and there are more career opportunities with a stronger ecomony than most of the Central Coast. Of course this depends on one's profession (ie - farmer, construction worker vs. software engineer, etc...). As a young man I initially wanted to live in Santa Cruz because of its great surf spots. However I couldn't get over the low paying wages or lack of career opportunities altogether. Consequently many locals who are trying to make a living and support a family make the long trek over the hill into the Valley daily. Its a pretty nasty drive.

Monterey is also unique in that it borders of Big Sur which one of the most beautiful sections of the CA coast. There is much to do if one enjoys exploring the outdoors. Fog is only really an issue during the summer months. And this also applies to the entire Central coast weather pattern. Drive inland a little ways and its sunny. But I actually look forward to some Summer fog after living in places where A/C is needed during the Summer months because of squelching heat. Of course everyone has their preferences.

By contrast SLO is just far enough inland to avoid the coastal fog.

Derek

Last edited by MtnSurfer; 07-10-2011 at 12:25 PM..
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Old 12-03-2011, 03:31 AM
 
Location: Pomeroy, WA (Near Lewiston, ID)
251 posts, read 387,672 times
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I am not a Poly student or grad, but Cal Poly is a GREAT school for engineering, computer science, archtechture, and agriculture. It is a very very competitive school. Poly grads are popular with companies becuase they learn practical education rather than theory like UC (I am a UC Grad). I would arguebly put Cal Poly as an eqaul with the the upper middle UCs like UC Davis, UCSB, and UCI.
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Old 12-03-2011, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Monterey, CA
276 posts, read 704,017 times
Reputation: 140
Is Monterey really known for retirees?? I've been living here for a month and haven't really notice a lot of retirees, perhaps a lot of military. I'm only 32, reading this thread I'm feeling much older.
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