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Old 12-25-2010, 01:49 PM
 
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I think the communities that have attracted businesses that require both blue collar and white collar jobs have been able to turn into desirable communities. The more of each type of job makes the city's economy better and the more job opportunities for college educated helps too.

Some businesses and places I can think of are:

Businesses:
Large four-year education universities, hospitals, law firms, engineering and architecture firms, technology based companies, and environmental based companies.

Places:
Historical buildings and natural landmarks.

Now, I find some of those businesses haven't located in certain communities because there is a lack of people wanting to move to certain communities. For instance, many cities and towns in the Central Valley rely heavily on farming, shopping centers, and small amounts of blue collared jobs because the flat scenery, hotter weather, and built up downtowns deter people that have an education and work in white collar jobs from working there. Since these communities have these issues, they are struggling in the economy since most of the middle class blue collar jobs have been cut.

Anyways, I was just thinking about this. Maybe this a city planning approach to thinking about certain communities in California.
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Old 12-26-2010, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
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Long Beach
El Segundo
Chatsworth
Oxnard
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Old 12-26-2010, 02:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Long Beach
El Segundo
Chatsworth
Oxnard
Long Beach has the college. Chatsworth has the trainstation. I am not sure what El Segundo and Oxnard have, but I heard Oxnard has gotten better over the years. I lived in Oxnard for a while growing up in the 90s.

Also, another thing I was thinking about is that communities that were originally county seats and business centers of the 19th century today can be said to be losing to other nearby cities and people in nearby communities are now commuting to other cities for jobs.

In the Central Coast for example, Salinas has many people commuting to the Monterey Bay for jobs.
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Columbia, California
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Santa Maria has always had me wondering. I remember when it was not even truck stop material. After the Home Depot came in there seemed to grow over night. Where do all these people work, are they all pickers? or does Home Depot employ everyone?
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Old 12-26-2010, 03:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferretkona View Post
Santa Maria has always had me wondering. I remember when it was not even truck stop material. After the Home Depot came in there seemed to grow over night. Where do all these people work, are they all pickers? or does Home Depot employ everyone?
Most of the people in Santa Maria work in the big box centers, the hospital, Santa Maria Superior Court, Hancock College, the farms, or commute to Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, or Vandenburg for work. A majority commute else where for work and most everybody else is working in a blue collar job or on the farms.
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Old 12-27-2010, 09:21 AM
 
Location: San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties
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The population of Santa Maria is about 90,-100,000.
Of that, 20-30,000 are farmworkers and their families. Much of the rest of the economy is based on supplying the needs of the farms, and the farmworkers.
The dollar value of Santa Maria valley crops is over $500,000,000 a year. Supporting that economy is big business, from cigarettes to John Deere tractors.

A brief and incomplete history. In 1955 the population was about 15,000 based on Ag, crops and ranching, and oil (Union Oil got its start in Santa Maria)

In 1958 the Army base, Camp Cooke, transferred to the Air Force and was re named Vandenberg and was selected as the center for Air Force missile work.

By 1965 there were 50,000 people in the area, mostly living in tract homes south of town, concrete slab floors, carports, that white quartzite pebble roofing, with name like Titan Way, and Atlas Street.

The town has again doubled since then, partly due to the expansion of agriculture, and part due to the pleasant climate and low home prices.

The heart of the downtown was ripped out and replaced with an indoor mall and large parking lot, and across the street a strip mall and large parking lot.

The center of gravity for shopping and dining has steadily moved south toward and including Orcutt.
Leaving the old downtown and the north side of town decaying.

The town is often referred to as Fresno on the Pacific, due to its sprawl, economic base and lack of culture, although one of California's finest theater groups is in Santa Maria, PCPA
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Old 12-27-2010, 07:51 PM
 
4,915 posts, read 12,099,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by .highnlite View Post
The population of Santa Maria is about 90,-100,000.
Of that, 20-30,000 are farmworkers and their families. Much of the rest of the economy is based on supplying the needs of the farms, and the farmworkers.
The dollar value of Santa Maria valley crops is over $500,000,000 a year. Supporting that economy is big business, from cigarettes to John Deere tractors.

A brief and incomplete history. In 1955 the population was about 15,000 based on Ag, crops and ranching, and oil (Union Oil got its start in Santa Maria)

In 1958 the Army base, Camp Cooke, transferred to the Air Force and was re named Vandenberg and was selected as the center for Air Force missile work.

By 1965 there were 50,000 people in the area, mostly living in tract homes south of town, concrete slab floors, carports, that white quartzite pebble roofing, with name like Titan Way, and Atlas Street.

The town has again doubled since then, partly due to the expansion of agriculture, and part due to the pleasant climate and low home prices.

The heart of the downtown was ripped out and replaced with an indoor mall and large parking lot, and across the street a strip mall and large parking lot.

The center of gravity for shopping and dining has steadily moved south toward and including Orcutt.
Leaving the old downtown and the north side of town decaying.

The town is often referred to as Fresno on the Pacific, due to its sprawl, economic base and lack of culture, although one of California's finest theater groups is in Santa Maria, PCPA
I thought Fresno had some culture. They have a Whole Foods and a college.
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Old 12-03-2011, 10:47 PM
 
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Well, Riverside and Montclair and Santa Ana all have Nordstrom's department store. And all cities get hot weather and its hard to imagine they have a high end department store because they have alot of crime.

I think good weather, safe neighborhoods, good schools, and a desirable downtown is what are making communities great. Also Trader Joes and Costco add to a city's desirability.
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Old 12-05-2011, 10:42 PM
 
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All the communities need roller rinks. They are friendly, social places that provide a common gathering area for all age groups. I believe a RR can provide a strong binding force for a Town!
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Old 12-07-2011, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,107 posts, read 29,390,636 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Trails View Post
All the communities need roller rinks. They are friendly, social places that provide a common gathering area for all age groups. I believe a RR can provide a strong binding force for a Town!

There's actually a large group of people in the SLO area who have been trying to get Flippos in Morro Bay opened up again.

Lots of good memories there
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