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View Poll Results: ?
Yes 13 29.55%
No 31 70.45%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 09-29-2016, 04:40 PM
 
2,966 posts, read 4,904,363 times
Reputation: 3838

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
No. I think there are much more important things to be offended about.
Poorly informed statements of "fact" do tend to be the intro to other more ignorant attacking remarks though. So not offended, but leery. People make landscapes metaphorical for lots of things. Very cleverly . Very.
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Old 09-30-2016, 03:47 AM
 
5,432 posts, read 5,873,587 times
Reputation: 2675
Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
I am a Bay Area transplants to San Diego, and I just wanted to clarify that San Diego actually receives just over 10 inches rain per year, so that is only double, not triple. And areas farther Inland from the coast actually receive more than that. Ramona, for example, gets more than 15 inches a year, which is more than San Jose.
San Diego averages 8 inches a year of precp. SF averages 22-25 thats more like triple than double.

Comparing Ramona, CA which an inland higher elevation area should be compared with the hills above San Jose or better yet than hills and mountains between Santa Cruz and San Jose which average 40-50 inches of rain such Felton, CA. Sacramento's Ramona would be Placerville which averages 38 inches of rain.

Ramona - 16 inches/yr
Felton - 49/yr
Placerville - 38/yr
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Old 09-30-2016, 04:15 AM
 
5,432 posts, read 5,873,587 times
Reputation: 2675
Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
Fortunately, there are those parts of Northern California that are remote, mountainous, and North enough to collect plenty of rain or snow that runs off into large reservoirs, but technically, you could say that the Northern California urban communities are also "stealing" the water from those locations hundreds of miles away. San Francisco and the peninsula, for example, could not support their populations without water from Yosemite. So what bothers me is that a lot of people in Northern California feel they have dibs on that water, just because it's technically in Northern California, even if it's still hours away. The reality is, we've built our cities in areas that don't have enough natural rainfall by a long shot to support their populations, and we have the unique ability to take advantage rainfall or snowfall areas to supplement that.
Except for SACRAMENTO!

Sacramento was built next to naturally flowing rivers for a reason. The confluence of two of the largest rivers in California - The Sacramento River and the American River. Besides those little towns or cities along smaller rivers and creeks throughout NorCal, you have Sacramento which sits where the largest River in California naturally flows to and along side the city.

Sacramento lives where the water naturally flows. We don't steal it from anybody. And one of Sacramento's Rivers largest tributaries, the American River, flows directly through the City and County of Sacramento. Sacramento uses the water that flows directly to us. Sacramentans are not stealing water from locations from which it does not flow as the rest all the big cities in California.
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Old 09-30-2016, 12:03 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 23,997,149 times
Reputation: 8833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chimérique View Post
San Diego averages 8 inches a year of precp. SF averages 22-25 thats more like triple than double.

Comparing Ramona, CA which an inland higher elevation area should be compared with the hills above San Jose or better yet than hills and mountains between Santa Cruz and San Jose which average 40-50 inches of rain such Felton, CA. Sacramento's Ramona would be Placerville which averages 38 inches of rain.

Ramona - 16 inches/yr
Felton - 49/yr
Placerville - 38/yr
San Diego averages 10 in of rain a year. 10.34, not 8.

Historical Rainfall - Lindbergh Field | San Diego County Water Authority
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Old 09-30-2016, 05:08 PM
 
5,432 posts, read 5,873,587 times
Reputation: 2675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
San Diego averages 10 in of rain a year. 10.34, not 8.

Historical Rainfall - Lindbergh Field | San Diego County Water Authority
Regardless of what source you use, the Bay Area/Sacramento average at least double in many cases triple the natural rainfall over San Diego. It's a big difference.
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Old 09-30-2016, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Laguna Niguel, Orange County CA
9,809 posts, read 8,908,338 times
Reputation: 7941
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
This is a picture taken near my house during the dry season, in the foothills of Orange County, about 15 miles from the coast. It was not planted nor watered by humans; the vegetation is mostly native. The grasses have dried out but the trees and small bushes are still green. Compare to any picture of the landscape around Palm Springs or Las Vegas and you will see that while indeed semi-arid, this is not a "desert" landscape.
Hikable
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Old 09-30-2016, 09:12 PM
 
5,870 posts, read 11,523,882 times
Reputation: 4551
Yes I do get offended, as it is ignorant.

California has the widest range of diverse environments. I'm in Pasadena and I have to merely get to a certain view, and I see Mt. Wilson, a mountain peak which averages 30 inches a year.

Its about as stupid as saying Chicago is in the middle of a cornfield.
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Old 09-30-2016, 11:18 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 23,997,149 times
Reputation: 8833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chimérique View Post
Regardless of what source you use, the Bay Area/Sacramento average at least double in many cases triple the natural rainfall over San Diego. It's a big difference.
Can't admit you were wrong can you? LOL
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Old 09-30-2016, 11:20 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 23,997,149 times
Reputation: 8833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
Yes I do get offended, as it is ignorant.

California has the widest range of diverse environments. I'm in Pasadena and I have to merely get to a certain view, and I see Mt. Wilson, a mountain peak which averages 30 inches a year.

Its about as stupid as saying Chicago is in the middle of a cornfield.
^^^This

Here is an old post I saved from a long time CD member I have not seen in a while, Fontucky:

Quote:
California, it's a lot more than your city.
California is 770 miles in length and 250 miles wide. It has an area of 163,696 square miles. It has the highest point of elevation in the lower 48, and the lowest place of elevation in North America. It has the hottest temperatures in the Western hemisphere. It has the snowiest place in the US. It has snow, glaciers, and ice. It has rain forests, arboreal forests, chaparral, fertile valleys, grasslands, high deserts, low deserts, sand dunes, and sun drenched beaches. It has places with two seasons and places with all four. It can feature tornadoes, water spouts, blizzards, floods, mudslides, land slides, rock slides, wildfires, killer waves, hurricane force winds, and lightning storms.
All of the above come with their own weather signatures and some come with their own microclimates. This is one bigassed, diverse state.
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Old 10-01-2016, 12:08 AM
 
5,870 posts, read 11,523,882 times
Reputation: 4551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
^^^This

Here is an old post I saved from a long time CD member I have not seen in a while, Fontucky:
Also, here is a great article:

Let's Get One Thing Straight: Los Angeles Is Not a Desert - Curbed LA
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