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Old 07-04-2017, 01:52 PM
 
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Whenever I look at the housing stock, landscape, and foggy climate of the eureka Area I can't help but see it as an early perfect representation of what the Bay Area was before housing costs killed the middle class. Is there anything wrong with viewing that region as a window into the bay areas past? Isn't driving through arcata like going back to the 1950s?
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Old 07-04-2017, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
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Having traveled to the North Coast on a number of occasions for business, I concur that the Humboldt Bay region does have some of the feel of the Bay Area. Eureka reminds me of a mini San Francisco or Portland. It has the feel of a larger town than its population would let on. Perhaps that's due to the fact that Eureka is the county seat for Humboldt County and the major commercial center on the North Coast.

Arcata has the feel of a mini Berkeley with its liberal/prog politics and the presence of Humboldt State University. That being said, I don't think there would be similarities between the two regions based on weather, housing and topography alone. The Bay Area before the tech and Internet booms had a more diversified industrialized economy with a number of blue-collar jobs. Take the Kaiser shipyards in Richmond or the Navy shipyards at Mare Island and Hunters Point as examples.

I agree that it seems as if the region is frozen in time, but that is due to the downturn in traditional industries such as fishing and forestry. The region is fairly remote, rugged and difficult to get to in a reasonable amount of time. There are only two ways by road, US-101 and SR-299 and both highways have been subject to closures or construction delays due to rock and mud slides from this past winter's rains. The local commercial airport is served by only two airlines and flights are subject to delays due to the fog. However, the Humboldt region has been experiencing an influx of workers and land investors due to the cannabis industry. In fact, property values have been increasing due to the demand and folks have been migrating to Humboldt County to work as trimmers in the marijuana grows.
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Old 07-05-2017, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Eureka CA
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No.
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Old 07-06-2017, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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No.
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Old 07-06-2017, 11:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
No.
Same weather no?
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Old 07-07-2017, 04:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Perma Bear View Post
Same weather no?
Not exactly, although there are some similarities. Eureka has far more rain and overcast than SF simply bc of latitude, and even more so when compared to other parts of the Bay Area. Humboldt is pure North Coast with corresponding vegetation while the Bay area is much more varied in terms of microclimates and vegetation, representing a much wider range of California's biodiversity. Reminds me a lot of the Sonoma coast or Mendocino but not Bay area proper.
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Old 07-07-2017, 07:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
Not exactly, although there are some similarities. Eureka has far more rain and overcast than SF simply bc of latitude, and even more so when compared to other parts of the Bay Area. Humboldt is pure North Coast with corresponding vegetation while the Bay area is much more varied in terms of microclimates and vegetation, representing a much wider range of California's biodiversity. Reminds me a lot of the Sonoma coast or Mendocino but not Bay area proper.
That means no risk of a 90 degree summer. 60- 70 degrees all season long sounds like heaven.

If you wanted sun you could go to rio dell, fortunate, defeat, or garberville no?

Also what biodiversity? You mean back when the Bay Area still had vegetation?

It would be nice to live there simply because it would be slower paced. Seeing all the small businesses, cheap real estate, and friendly folk without all the snobbish hipsters would be like stepping back in time.

Last edited by Perma Bear; 07-07-2017 at 07:49 AM..
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Old 07-07-2017, 07:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perma Bear View Post
That means no risk of a 90 degree summer. 60- 70 degrees all season long sounds like heaven.

If you wanted sun you could go to rio dell, fortunate, defeat, or garberville no?

Also what biodiversity? You mean back when the Bay Area still had vegetation?

It would be nice to live there simply because it would be slower paced. Seeing all the small businesses, cheap real estate, and friendly folk without all the snobbish hipsters would be like stepping g back in time.
Indeed, you would not have to contend with summer heat but could go in land to get the sun. Of course, those Inland areas you mention are still in relatively forested areas, unlike the Bay Area. I guess part of my perspective is that I grew up in Walnut Creek, where the natural vegetation is just dry grass, oak trees, and Chaparral. Redwood forests always seemed like something you would see on a day trip north of the Golden Gate. So I don't necessarily associate that it habitat as being quintessentially Bay Area. I I think the Bay Area has a lot more natural climactic and vegetative variation that also includes drier and hotter habitats than those you'll find on the North Coast. I agree it sounds nice to have peace and quiet, but I think the distance from urban infrastructure is too great for me.
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Old 07-07-2017, 07:54 AM
 
4,369 posts, read 3,727,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstieber View Post
Indeed, you would not have to contend with summer heat but could go in land to get the sun. Of course, those Inland areas you mention are still in relatively forested areas, unlike the Bay Area. I guess part of my perspective is that I grew up in Walnut Creek, where the natural vegetation is just dry grass, oak trees, and Chaparral. Redwood forests always seemed like something you would see on a day trip north of the Golden Gate. So I don't necessarily associate that it habitat as being quintessentially Bay Area. I I think the Bay Area has a lot more natural climactic and vegetative variation that also includes drier and hotter habitats than those you'll find on the North Coast. I agree it sounds nice to have peace and quiet, but I think the distance from urban infrastructure is too great for me.
They have Costco. That's enough urbanism for me.
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Old 07-08-2017, 01:09 AM
 
1,676 posts, read 1,536,469 times
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Originally Posted by Perma Bear View Post
Same weather no?
Coastal Humboldt is roughly twice as foggy and twice as rainy as San Francisco. Temperatures tend to run cooler and winds are higher here as well. Climate change may push our temperatures up a bit and our fog down a bit but if we hit 67-68 on a summer day that's a pretty warm day. We're in July now and in a solid summer pattern with fog lasting through the noon hour, then anywhere from 30 minutes to 6 hours of sunshine and temperatures usually between 59 and 62 degrees. This is normal. Choose wisely.
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