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Old 03-27-2018, 11:58 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
1,701 posts, read 1,558,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
Fresno, and the rest of the Central Valley, can get a lot of Tule fog during winter. I think Redding being at the very far northern end of the valley manages to avoid a lot of it somehow.
I think you are right. Redding is located on mild hilly terrain prior to reaching the foothills of the southern end of the Cascade Ranges. Since it is higher in elevation compared to other towns in the Sacramento Valley it doesn’t get tule fog as much.
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Old 03-27-2018, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Oroville, California
3,382 posts, read 5,310,194 times
Reputation: 6462
1. No/little fog in the winter
2. No/little monsoon moisture in the summer (like the SW)
3. No/little rain from May through October

Even an hour an a half south in Oroville we have sun the vast majority of the time. We get an average winter 29" to 30" of rain, but its concentrated in just a few months. I actually get sick of the near constant sunshine. Moved here from Monterey and I learned to enjoy the summer fog in the evenings and mornings there.
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Old 03-27-2018, 12:36 PM
 
Location: N.Sierra Nevadas (California)
68,917 posts, read 5,439,540 times
Reputation: 22778
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeauCharles View Post
1. No/little fog in the winter
2. No/little monsoon moisture in the summer (like the SW)
3. No/little rain from May through October

Even an hour an a half south in Oroville we have sun the vast majority of the time. We get an average winter 29" to 30" of rain, but its concentrated in just a few months. I actually get sick of the near constant sunshine. Moved here from Monterey and I learned to enjoy the summer fog in the evenings and mornings there.
Charles that is funny, I sometimes yearn for a few clouds or some fog to break the monotony of constant blue sky in the summer ( I'm in Paradise moved from fog zone Bay Area )
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Old 03-27-2018, 09:44 PM
 
28,741 posts, read 31,400,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
I've wondered the same. How is Redding sunnier than Phoenix and Tucson, doesn't seem to make sense. I've read the posts and I guess it's possible that Redding dumps rain and then clears up and is sunny but it just doesn't seem like a city with this level of rain would be the 2nd sunniest in the nation.
Redding's sunshine data is only based on 10 years' worth of data, so that might not be a long enough record to make comparisons with other places that measure sunshine over long time periods.
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Old 03-27-2018, 09:48 PM
 
28,741 posts, read 31,400,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sav858 View Post
It’s evelvation is only 340ft, not exactly an altitude that would make a huge difference alone. According to post #11 it appears its location at the northern end does indeed play a role.
It doesn't need to be that high--just a few hundred two above nearby surrounding areas is enough to make a significant difference.

And 340 feet is on the low end. Redding's weather station is over 500 feet.

https://wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?caredd+nca
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Old 03-27-2018, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,700 posts, read 26,637,044 times
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I'm no meteorologist, but I lived in Redding for a year. I actually started a thread here on CD about how i couldn't believe it, but I was actually sick of sunshine. My main point was because it also meant another brutally hot day. But, it's just not cloudy there, except for here and there in the winter.

Redding is actually a really nice place to be in winter. It's sunny and not hot, the air is clean and you can see the snow capped mountains all around you. It's very pretty. And the year I lived there, we just got a little snow around Thanksgiving that stayed on the ground about a week, and that was it as far as snow in town. I left because I couldn't take the long, brutal summers.
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Old 03-27-2018, 10:23 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
87,900 posts, read 81,705,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
It's not because it's at the northern end. It's because of elevation above the valley floor. Cold, damp air is heavier than warm air. So cold, damp air sinks to lower elevations.
Exactly.
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Old 03-28-2018, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
22,937 posts, read 12,280,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I'm no meteorologist, but I lived in Redding for a year. I actually started a thread here on CD about how i couldn't believe it, but I was actually sick of sunshine. My main point was because it also meant another brutally hot day. But, it's just not cloudy there, except for here and there in the winter.

Redding is actually a really nice place to be in winter. It's sunny and not hot, the air is clean and you can see the snow capped mountains all around you. It's very pretty. And the year I lived there, we just got a little snow around Thanksgiving that stayed on the ground about a week, and that was it as far as snow in town. I left because I couldn't take the long, brutal summers.
So what has confused me is how the winter can get that much sunshine after getting dumped with rain in Dec-Feb....so does it dump rain and then clear up, rain at night, what's the pattern like?

I have Redding on the list of possible places to retire and I need sun, sick of the gray PNW winters. My current plan is to winter in Phoenix and the rest of the year in PNW but Redding could be a year round location is my thinking.

About that brutal summer, the climate data still shows nightly lows of about 64F so I think I could deal with the summer daytime heat by getting in a pool.
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Old 03-28-2018, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,700 posts, read 26,637,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
So what has confused me is how the winter can get that much sunshine after getting dumped with rain in Dec-Feb....so does it dump rain and then clear up, rain at night, what's the pattern like?

I have Redding on the list of possible places to retire and I need sun, sick of the gray PNW winters. My current plan is to winter in Phoenix and the rest of the year in PNW but Redding could be a year round location is my thinking.

About that brutal summer, the climate data still shows nightly lows of about 64F so I think I could deal with the summer daytime heat by getting in a pool.
Hah! Let me dispel your thinking as far as cooling off in the evenings. This tricked me, too. And I'm a research-aholic. If you look at the data for hourly forecasts, you will learn that the nighttime low doesn't occur until about 4am. So, you do not get the evening or nighttime cooldown temps you'd expect.

Then, by about 10am, it's unbearably hot again. So, your only window of comfortable outdoor temps is from about 4am to about 10am max. Forget the rest of the day, and forget the evenings.

I think what would be helpful for you, is to look at the monthly calendars on a weather website, like here:

https://www.wunderground.com/history...calwx_calendar

Then, also look at the hourly data, so you can see when it gets hot and when it cools down.
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Old 03-28-2018, 11:51 PM
DKM
 
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
5,549 posts, read 2,008,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
It doesn't need to be that high--just a few hundred two above nearby surrounding areas is enough to make a significant difference.

And 340 feet is on the low end. Redding's weather station is over 500 feet.

https://wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?caredd+nca
Not just at the low end, there is no part of Redding below 400ft. He probably meant to type 540 ft. which is high enough to block valley fog, but so are the hills south of redding blocking valley fog.
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