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Old 07-16-2011, 10:45 PM
 
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Properly speaking the name New England (first used by John Smith in his expedition of Massachusetts) has precedence over all but Acadia doesn't it?
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Old 07-16-2011, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Macao
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I believe they call themselves 'Maritimers'.

I've known a ton of them...but never once heard them use any 'New England' reference.
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Old 07-16-2011, 11:38 PM
 
Location: White Rock BC
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Never even heard them really compared.
Also, although Atlantic Canada is still geographically correct in Canada we view things as more Maritimes {NS/PEI/NB} and then NFLD. Newfoundland didn't join confederation til 1949 and is socially, historically, and politically VERY different from the Maritimes.
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Old 07-16-2011, 11:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
Properly speaking the name New England (first used by John Smith in his expedition of Massachusetts) has precedence over all but Acadia doesn't it?
Maritimers consider themselves to be Canadians. They still identify with and are proud of their home provinces, of course, but these people -- particularly the New Brunswickers and the Nova Scotians -- were overwhelmingly loyalist in orientation. New Brunswick and Nova Scotia were two of the original four provinces of Canada, a country that was founded by loyalists to fend off what they considered to be the unwelcome and undesirable expansionist tendencies of the revolutionaries to the south, many of whom were found in New England.

Some Maritimers might be fans of New England professional sports teams due to geographic proximity, some might share similar occupations and lifestyles with the people of New England, and some may holiday in the New England states, but that is about the extent of it. These people do not consider their provinces to be part of New England or themselves to be New Englanders.

Newfoundland is a different case altogether. More than a few Newfoundlanders -- particularly those of Irish Catholic stock -- do not think of themselves as Canadian at all. They also do not consider themselves to be New Englanders. And whether Catholic or Protestant, many Newfoundlanders consider themselves to be Newfoundlanders first and foremost, and Canadians a distant second. That may change as Newfoundland's economic fortunes improve and as time puts temporal distance between the people of Newfoundland and the Confederation vote controversies of the late 1940s.

Last edited by maclock; 07-17-2011 at 12:45 AM..
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Old 07-17-2011, 03:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I believe they call themselves 'Maritimers'.

I've known a ton of them...but never once heard them use any 'New England' reference.
Ditto. My family is Canadian, and we spent much time there.

I guess some Americans still haven't given up on their obsession that Canada really should be part of the U.S.
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Old 07-17-2011, 04:49 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Ditto. My family is Canadian, and we spent much time there.

I guess some Americans still haven't given up on their obsession that Canada really should be part of the U.S.
Surely we can refrain from taking swipes at our friendly American neighbour. I do not think that Manifest Destiny or any similar notion inspired the original poster's query.
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Old 07-17-2011, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Ditto. My family is Canadian, and we spent much time there.

I guess some Americans still haven't given up on their obsession that Canada really should be part of the U.S.
Overreact much?
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Old 07-17-2011, 05:04 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Overreact much?
Precisely. Sadly, that poster's reaction might be well-received by a certain anti-American segment that is unapologetically present in supposedly polite Canadian society.
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Old 07-17-2011, 05:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Ditto. My family is Canadian, and we spent much time there.

I guess some Americans still haven't given up on their obsession that Canada really should be part of the U.S.
Didnt we repel several of Americas attempts to take over our country?
and didnt we have something to do with burning down their White House?
I would think a Canadian maritimer would be highly insulted if he were referred to as a New Englander..

One such battle
http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.c...=A1ARTA0001539
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Didnt we repel several of Americas attempts to take over our country?
and didnt we have something to do with burning down their White House?
I would think a Canadian maritimer would be highly insulted if he were referred to as a New Englander..

One such battle
Battle of Ch√Ęteauguay - The Canadian Encyclopedia
  • America never tried to take over Canada. The British colonies, either independently or in the loose union of British North America, suffered a few such campaigns before Canada was formed in 1867, however.
  • The Brits burned down the White House, not the Canadians. Along with the Battle of Chateauguay that you linked, this was an action in the War of 1812, a war between Britain and the United States. The war ended over a half-century before Canada was formed.
  • On your last point, we are agreed. Nova Scotians and New Brunswickers in particular. Nova Scotia and New Brunswick were two of the original four provinces that signed up to form Canada and thus there are strong pro-Canadian sentiments in both provinces.

Last edited by maclock; 07-17-2011 at 06:26 AM..
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