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Old 08-10-2011, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Quincy, Mass. (near Boston)
2,950 posts, read 5,202,669 times
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I'm confused as to whether I'm automatically a Canadian citizen due to the fact both parents were born in Canada (one in Quebec, if that matters). I was born in America.

Am I automatically a Canadian, considered to already have dual citizenship, or to attain this, must I go through either a simple or rigorous process?

I'm college educated but don't have much money or even a typical career path, just a non-glamorus, menial job any local or immigrant can do. Frankly, I don't bring much to the table, and understsnd why you may not want me in Canada. I'm not a doctor or other valuable person.

Isn't it a requirement now that immigrants arrive with some money, education, sponsorship, etc? Or is that only for people who don't have Canadian-born parent(s) or even siblings born in Cana?

The NY Times had a story last year how Winnipeg is welcoming educated immigrants.


Thanks.
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Old 08-10-2011, 06:13 PM
 
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The correct terminology is Canadian by decent, It would be in your best interest to acquire a Canadian passport just to formalize your Canadian status..
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Old 08-10-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,560 posts, read 14,471,600 times
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Used to be, the US didn't acknowledge dual citizenship, but Canada did (and pretty sure it still does). I think it's fairly difficult to lose Canadian citizenship without a formal and explicit renunciation. I used to work with an older fellow, US-raised, who emigrated and adopted Canadian citizenship. When he moved back to the US (whose citizenship he had, by law, lost when he took Canadian citizenship), he wanted to re-naturalize but wasn't happy about losing his Canadian citizenship. The Canadians told him, paraphrased: "Don't worry about it. You won't lose ours unless you come to Canada, or to a consulate, and file the proper paperwork formally renouncing Canadian citizenship. Just tell the Americans whatever they want to hear--it's not binding on us. Who is and is not Canadian isn't up to them." From the way he described it, they seemed to enjoy pointing out that last part.

It would surprise me if you were not considered Canadian by the Canadians, and US by us. That would make the US State Department crabby, of course. One thing to consider is that if you are considered a US citizen, you are legally required to file US tax returns even if you aren't here and have no US income. I presume a lot of people don't bother with this, but anything that involves the IRS becomes scary the minute you set foot in the US again.
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Old 08-10-2011, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,016 posts, read 12,590,259 times
Reputation: 9030
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonguy1960 View Post
I'm confused as to whether I'm automatically a Canadian citizen due to the fact both parents were born in Canada (one in Quebec, if that matters). I was born in America.

Am I automatically a Canadian, considered to already have dual citizenship, or to attain this, must I go through either a simple or rigorous process?

I'm college educated but don't have much money or even a typical career path, just a non-glamorus, menial job any local or immigrant can do. Frankly, I don't bring much to the table, and understsnd why you may not want me in Canada. I'm not a doctor or other valuable person.

Isn't it a requirement now that immigrants arrive with some money, education, sponsorship, etc? Or is that only for people who don't have Canadian-born parent(s) or even siblings born in Cana?

The NY Times had a story last year how Winnipeg is welcoming educated immigrants.


Thanks.
You know, you make a statement in your post that is very wrong. "I'm not a Dr. or other valuable person". You are just as valuable as anyone else and I want you to remember that fact. In fact your humility is very attractive in a person.

I think that's one of the main differences between the USA and Canada. People are accepted here for who they are not what they do. I have one son who is a medical specialist and another who is a construction worker. I know that neither one of them would think of themselves better than the other because of their occupation.


I'm pretty sure that you will find you are a Canadian because of your parents. If you are thinking of moving to Canada, where do you think you will go? Tell us Canuks what you are looking for and we can maybe be of some help to you.
Good luck to you and the best for your future.
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Old 08-10-2011, 11:23 PM
 
1,264 posts, read 3,863,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonguy1960 View Post
Am I automatically a Canadian, considered to already have dual citizenship, or to attain this, must I go through either a simple or rigorous process?

I'm college educated but don't have much money or even a typical career path, just a non-glamorus, menial job any local or immigrant can do. Frankly, I don't bring much to the table, and understsnd why you may not want me in Canada. I'm not a doctor or other valuable person.
They change the rule a while ago. You need to apply for your citizenship certificate, and your chances of getting it is like 100%.

Quote:
If you were born outside Canada
I know of a business grad, who loves dirtying his hands and automotive parts, he went for his trade license and now owns his automotive repair shop.

A dental hygienist is making a decent income.
Dental Hygienist Salary
This profession should be still in demand since it is listed as one of the 29 eligible occupations on C.I.C. (Citizenship and Immigration Canada) website.

If you are an outdoor type, there are opportunities say for example,
Apprentice Electrician
https://wwe1.bchydro.com/csbsites/bc...goryCode=14203
BC Hydro - LA14 Average Salary By Gender & Affiliation
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Old 08-11-2011, 05:02 AM
 
Location: Quincy, Mass. (near Boston)
2,950 posts, read 5,202,669 times
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Thanks for all the feedback.

I thought it was a common sense answer to a silly question, but wasn't sure how to phrase it or even research this fully.

Lucknow: yeah, I guess parts of the U.S., esp. here in Boston, can be a bit obsessed about where you went to college, what do you do for work, etc. I'm sure Toronto can be like that, but it's nice to know not everyone is so preoccupied with this. True, it's important, to some extent, but I try to get to know a person a bit before asking where they were educated or where they work. But, if I had a prestigious job, maybe I'd brag to everyone! But I like my workday, do that's what matters.
l
Victoria is intriguing to me. Never been there (have researched s bit) but was shocked to see a post on Craigslist a few months ago saying it's deteriorating. Seriously? This shocked me, as I thought it as an alternative to too trendy Vancouvet. Hmm..
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Old 08-14-2011, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
2,339 posts, read 2,074,076 times
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You may be eligible for citizenship but you'll never know until you apply.
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Old 08-18-2011, 02:31 PM
 
2,869 posts, read 5,141,530 times
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To the OP -- this link on a federal (Canada) gov't website might help you:

Dual Citizenship: What You Need to Know

Quote:
Originally Posted by j_k_k View Post
Used to be, the US didn't acknowledge dual citizenship, but Canada did (and pretty sure it still does). I think it's fairly difficult to lose Canadian citizenship without a formal and explicit renunciation. I used to work with an older fellow, US-raised, who emigrated and adopted Canadian citizenship. When he moved back to the US (whose citizenship he had, by law, lost when he took Canadian citizenship), he wanted to re-naturalize but wasn't happy about losing his Canadian citizenship. The Canadians told him, paraphrased: "Don't worry about it. You won't lose ours unless you come to Canada, or to a consulate, and file the proper paperwork formally renouncing Canadian citizenship. Just tell the Americans whatever they want to hear--it's not binding on us. Who is and is not Canadian isn't up to them." From the way he described it, they seemed to enjoy pointing out that last part.

It would surprise me if you were not considered Canadian by the Canadians, and US by us. That would make the US State Department crabby, of course. One thing to consider is that if you are considered a US citizen, you are legally required to file US tax returns even if you aren't here and have no US income. I presume a lot of people don't bother with this, but anything that involves the IRS becomes scary the minute you set foot in the US again.
1) you no longer lose your US citizenship once you become a citizen of another country. I couldn't find an official link (didn't look hard) but I did find a few websites that say so, and that's what we were told when our son, American by birth as he was born in the US, got his certificate of citizenship and then Canadian passport (as both the mom and I are Canadian). So unless I'm mistaken the OP is automatically Canadian because at least one of his parents was. This is beyond the OP's question, but if he has children born outside Canada, they no longer are automatically Canadian and would need to come to Canada, be sponsored and I don't know what else to be able to apply for Canadian citizenship. i.e. the rule is 1st generation children are still automatically Canadian but 2nd generation children aren't.

2) the US and Canada have a tax treaty that describes where earned income is taxed -- it does complicate the process of filing tax returns, but generally income is taxed where it is earned, so if you're an American earning income in Canada, your Canadian income will be taxed in Canada, and your American income will be taxed in the US. Of course, like you said you likely need to file a US tax return.
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,560 posts, read 14,471,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
2) the US and Canada have a tax treaty that describes where earned income is taxed -- it does complicate the process of filing tax returns, but generally income is taxed where it is earned, so if you're an American earning income in Canada, your Canadian income will be taxed in Canada, and your American income will be taxed in the US. Of course, like you said you likely need to file a US tax return.
Right. My complaint is that even if I live abroad, my nation demands that I report my finances to it, even if I have no US income. Which is why if I emigrate, rather than remain a dual citizen, I will renounce my US citizenship.
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Old 08-27-2011, 03:39 AM
 
109 posts, read 312,528 times
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You are first generation Canadian born abroad. Thanks to the passage of Bill 37 and by the tireless efforts of Don Chapman, leader of the Lost Canadians. We have our birth right citizenship. Please check out Lost Canadians.org and Lost Canadians.com
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