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View Poll Results: Should Canada bring back the death penalty?
Not only no, but HELL no 23 53.49%
No, too many mistakes, not convinced it helps reduce crime 8 18.60%
Undecided. Maybe for exceptional cases? 4 9.30%
Yes, the USA has it right in this case. Let them hang! 8 18.60%
Voters: 43. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-07-2012, 01:17 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,327 posts, read 3,180,731 times
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I find this kind of hard to believe. If that's true, then even Texas isn't as pro-death penalty as British Columbia.

B.C. residents back death penalty, new poll suggests

What do you think?
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Old 08-07-2012, 01:39 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 9,630,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
I find this kind of hard to believe. If that's true, then even Texas isn't as pro-death penalty as British Columbia.

B.C. residents back death penalty, new poll suggests

What do you think?
I don't think they're pro-death penalty, it has more to do with handing out life sentences and then watching these violent criminals walk in 5 or 10 years and commit another violent crime.

If life meant life for violent offenders then more people would be against the death penalty.
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Old 08-07-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,327 posts, read 3,180,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedJacket View Post
I don't think they're pro-death penalty, it has more to do with handing out life sentences and then watching these violent criminals walk in 5 or 10 years and commit another violent crime.

If life meant life for violent offenders then more people would be against the death penalty.
So basically BCers don't want the DP, but they prefer American-style justice over what they have now given the choice?
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Old 08-07-2012, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,865 posts, read 10,526,770 times
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72%, not 82%. I can totally believe this though, British Columbians seem to have a keen sense of order and have very little tolerance for rule breaking as a culture. I'm still trying to understand this culture so I can't really express in an articulate way why this is true, but I feel like a defining feature of British Columbian society is the juxtaposition of an extremely ordered, dignified, almost sterile mainstream with a wildly degenerate underbelly (and I don't just mean in Vancouver). I feel like this essential conflict may be responsible for these attitudes, as might be the unconscious cultural effects of economic inequality on how people view criminality.
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Old 08-07-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,327 posts, read 3,180,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
72%, not 82%. I can totally believe this though, British Columbians seem to have a keen sense of order and have very little tolerance for rule breaking as a culture. I'm still trying to understand this culture so I can't really express in an articulate way why this is true, but I feel like a defining feature of British Columbian society is the juxtaposition of an extremely ordered, dignified, almost sterile mainstream with a wildly degenerate underbelly (and I don't just mean in Vancouver). I feel like this essential conflict may be responsible for these attitudes, as might be the unconscious cultural effects of economic inequality on how people view criminality.
So they're almost a little bit like Singaporeans in a sense?

I quoted 82% because that was the figure for 'sometimes appropriate' ... imo if you're even a little bit pro-death penalty, you're still for it. And yes, BC seems like a very unequal society to me. I befriended a homeless First Nations man who told me he went to Berlin in 1991, which was soon after the Wall fell, and said that the division between Downtown and the Downtown Eastside reminds him of West and East Berlin during that time. He invited me into his apartment on the Eastside that night to sleep, and I have to say, I could very much imagine housing in the Soviet Union might have felt similar.

I think that when you have that kind of inequality, the upper class views the lower class as 'sub-human' to begin with, so of course they're not going to be upset with criminals from the lower class being put to death. And if someone from the upper class commits a crime, it would put them into the 'sub-human' category in that culture.
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Old 08-07-2012, 02:16 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 9,630,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
So basically BCers don't want the DP, but they prefer American-style justice over what they have now given the choice?
What I'm saying is -- if life meant life, then fewer people would be hollering about the death penalty.
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Old 08-07-2012, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,038,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
72%, not 82%. I can totally believe this though, British Columbians seem to have a keen sense of order and have very little tolerance for rule breaking as a culture. I'm still trying to understand this culture so I can't really express in an articulate way why this is true, but I feel like a defining feature of British Columbian society is the juxtaposition of an extremely ordered, dignified, almost sterile mainstream with a wildly degenerate underbelly (and I don't just mean in Vancouver). I feel like this essential conflict may be responsible for these attitudes, as might be the unconscious cultural effects of economic inequality on how people view criminality.
I agree with your definition. It seems like when degenerates commit violent crimes in BC they don't do it by half measures, they are wildly extreme. There are some really horrible crimes that have happened in BC - they don't happen too often but when they do they are horrifically degenerate. You take characters like Clifford Olsen (kidnapped, sexually assaulted and killed 11 children), Willy Pickton (killed 49 women then butchered them and fed their bodies to his pigs), the "Shoreline Six" who killed Reena Virk (swarmed her, beat her, stubbed cigarettes out on her forehead, broke her arms and then drowned her), and more recently a couple of teenage girls who were brutally beaten to death, one beaten with a 2x4 and one with fists - yes, I would like to see the death penalty for people who are convicted of committing crimes like that and have no remorse for what they did. As far as I'm concerned they're no better than rabid dogs and we put rabid dogs down out of their misery, so why not put down degenerates like that? What's the point in keeping them locked up alive where they can continue to torment the families of their victims the way Clifford Olsen did for years and years afterwards with his boastful letters and his book?

The death penalty in such instances might not deter other criminals from committing similar crimes but I would feel better in knowing that those kinds of murderers were meeting the death penalty and not being fed and housed for the rest of their lives supported by tax payers dollars with nothing constructive to show for it. The article said "Seventy-two per cent of B.C. residents surveyed said they believed a return to capital punishment in some cases would be a good thing." Count me in with that 72%.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 08-07-2012 at 06:36 PM..
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Old 08-09-2012, 07:31 AM
 
13,511 posts, read 19,281,755 times
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I think it's an absolutely USELESS poll.....1000 people does not in ANY way represent what the other 4 million plus people think.....
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Old 08-09-2012, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
9,019 posts, read 14,291,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedJacket View Post
What I'm saying is -- if life meant life, then fewer people would be hollering about the death penalty.
In Canada, life actually does mean life. You are only eligible for PAROLE after either 10 or 25 years. You're still convicted for life.
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:59 PM
 
707 posts, read 687,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
In Canada, life actually does mean life. You are only eligible for PAROLE after either 10 or 25 years. You're still convicted for life.
Conviction and actually remaining in jail are not neccessarily the same thing.
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