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Old 12-18-2012, 04:37 PM
 
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Several other sites I've been scraping together information on the maritimes have had comments discussing the high occurrence of cancer rates on PEI, cause being given to the farming culture there. I went to a Canadian site for cancer statistics that showed what I thought to be relatively low cancer rate numbers, even given the smaller population of PEI. I believe it said it estimated 850 give or take new diagnosis of cancer for the 2012 year. Is this common knowledge/part of the dialogue in Canada or are these comments from alarmist types?
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Old 12-18-2012, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley
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I've read on this forum about higher rates of cancer in the US states below the maritimes but have no statistics.

You could probably do a search here and find those posts. I believe it was inthe Maine forum.
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Old 12-19-2012, 08:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dinessa99 View Post
Several other sites I've been scraping together information on the maritimes have had comments discussing the high occurrence of cancer rates on PEI, cause being given to the farming culture there. I went to a Canadian site for cancer statistics that showed what I thought to be relatively low cancer rate numbers, even given the smaller population of PEI. I believe it said it estimated 850 give or take new diagnosis of cancer for the 2012 year. Is this common knowledge/part of the dialogue in Canada or are these comments from alarmist types?
You can find cancer statistics by province at the following link:

http://www.cancer.ca/~/media/CCS/Can...20English.ashx

According to the Canadian Cancer Registry, "incidence rates for all cancers combined in males is highest in the Atlantic Provinces, Quebec and Ontario For females, highest rates occur in Quebec, Nova Scotia, Ontario and New Brunswick. Lowest rates for males and females are in British Columbia."

At least for lung cancer the registry attributes that to higher smoking rates in Quebec and the Atlantic provinces.
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Old 12-19-2012, 03:28 PM
 
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I've heard cancer rates are higher in the Atlantic provinces due to a more rapidly ageing population there. More grey heads, more cases of cancer. Also I believe there are more older smokers per capita.
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Old 12-19-2012, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Originally Posted by That Ottawa One View Post
I've heard cancer rates are higher in the Atlantic provinces due to a more rapidly ageing population there. More grey heads, more cases of cancer. Also I believe there are more older smokers per capita.
It could also have to do with diet. I believe I read a statistic somewhere that New Brunswick has the most obesity in Canada, and brown abdominal fat is a risk factor for a variety of cancers, as is a high fat low fibre diet even without the obesity.
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Old 12-20-2012, 07:04 AM
 
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The comments I had read specifically mentioned because of the various chemical fertilizers for farming. Those incidents attributed to smoking, old age, etc I can handle. Living in a chemical dump I cannot.

Also, I did go to the canada.gov site for the cancer statistics. I just am never sure what links you are and are not allowed to post in these forums so I don't post any.
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Old 12-20-2012, 08:20 AM
 
10,553 posts, read 9,660,879 times
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Originally Posted by dinessa99 View Post
The comments I had read specifically mentioned because of the various chemical fertilizers for farming. Those incidents attributed to smoking, old age, etc I can handle. Living in a chemical dump I cannot.

Also, I did go to the canada.gov site for the cancer statistics. I just am never sure what links you are and are not allowed to post in these forums so I don't post any.

It is difficult epidemiologically to prove a link between a localized carcinogen, like fertilizers and pesticides, and cancer rates. I remember several years ago there was a reportedly high incidence of breast cancer near the cranberry bogs in areas of the northeast U.S. Investigations yielded mixed results.

http://www.silentspring.org/our-rese...ironment-study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1380593/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1242018/

I know I've also read about agricultural workers in different parts of the world having a higher incidence of cancer. But when I researched this I found that "Agricultural populations tend to have lower overall cancer incidence and mortality rates than the general population." The following article discusses this issue.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3052640/

Last edited by ellemint; 12-20-2012 at 09:06 AM..
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Old 12-21-2012, 09:41 PM
 
27 posts, read 52,064 times
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Originally Posted by ellemint View Post
It is difficult epidemiologically to prove a link between a localized carcinogen, like fertilizers and pesticides, and cancer rates. I remember several years ago there was a reportedly high incidence of breast cancer near the cranberry bogs in areas of the northeast U.S. Investigations yielded mixed results.

Silent Spring Institute | Cape Cod Breast Cancer and Environment Study

Cancer risk and residential proximity to cranberry cultivation in Massachusetts.

Breast cancer risk and historical exposure to pesticides from wide-area applications assessed with GIS.

I know I've also read about agricultural workers in different parts of the world having a higher incidence of cancer. But when I researched this I found that "Agricultural populations tend to have lower overall cancer incidence and mortality rates than the general population." The following article discusses this issue.

An Update of Cancer Incidence in the Agricultural Health Study
Thanks very much! That's a lot of interesting information! I had seen a fascinating documentary regarding a small town in France who was experiencing cancer rates as well as other illnesses that was fully attributed to the farming community that surrounded it. I regularly search Maritime newspapers online and hadn't read anything regarding local cancer rates so I figured I'd try here. I know it's hard to back up scientifically but I wanted to know if it was sort of, common discourse in general.

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