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Old 12-29-2012, 12:29 PM
 
11 posts, read 19,106 times
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Hi everyone,

I have not been to Canada and Australia before but its curious for me to know more about these two countries. Lets discuss some common points and different points between the two countries and which way/country you like it more.


Thanks for everyone's opinions
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Old 12-29-2012, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,261 posts, read 14,276,725 times
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I look at it as pretty much Canada, but dry, flat-ish, and having summertime right now!
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Old 12-30-2012, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,590 posts, read 2,067,279 times
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I've lived in Canada all my life, but have visited Australia on more than a few occasions, and have spent a lot of time there. Let's see what I can contribute.

Similarities:

-- Both countries use a decimal currency called the dollar. The currencies freely trade on world markets, and in my experience, are roughly worth the same. There was little "currency exchange" shock. Obviously, I cannot proffer a CDN $20 bill in the shops of Perth WA, but I can trade that CDN $20 bill at a bank for an AUD $20 note, and use that. Thankfully, the Bank of Australia recognizes my home currency, and does not require it to be changed into something else first (e.g. US dollars or UK pounds). Never had a problem changing Canadian dollars into Australian dollars at any Australian bank.

-- Both countries are huge in area, while sparsely populated. Like Canada, Australia's population is concentrated in the cities. I did discover a number of towns and villages in the Australian hinterland, however--it is not the blank slate one sees on the maps.

-- Both countries share a political inheritance from the UK: rule of law, legal and other rights, and a parliamentary government. Somewhat similarly, both are federated countries (like the US), with a separation of powers between state/provincial and federal governments.

Differences:

-- First, the obvious one: Aussies drive on the left. Canadians, like Americans, drive on the right. I managed in Australia, but that's the best I can admit. I did get used to it, but it wasn't easy at first.

-- Next, the differences in sports. Aussies seem to be mad for cricket, rugby, and Aussie Rules Football (AFL). All very well and good, but in Canada, it's ice hockey, Canadian football, American football, American baseball (Toronto has a team in the US leagues), and yet more ice hockey. In fact, calling it "ice hockey" in Canada will get you some dirty looks, as Canadians believe that the only true hockey is the game played on ice, while the game played on grass with curved sticks is an aberration. Aussies, and other countries where field hockey is played, disagree. At any rate, few Canadians know cricket, rugby, field hockey, and AFL, and even fewer play them. Most Canadians play (real ) hockey, CFL/NFL football, baseball, and variations on the above.

-- On a more personal note, I found Aussies to be much more friendly than Canadians. And I say that as a Canadian. I had no trouble striking up a conversation with an Aussie in an Aussie pub; I've had a hard time doing the same in a Canadian pub.
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Old 12-31-2012, 03:53 PM
 
25,058 posts, read 24,898,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I've lived in Canada all my life, but have visited Australia on more than a few occasions, and have spent a lot of time there. Let's see what I can contribute.

Similarities:

-- Both countries use a decimal currency called the dollar. The currencies freely trade on world markets, and in my experience, are roughly worth the same. There was little "currency exchange" shock. Obviously, I cannot proffer a CDN $20 bill in the shops of Perth WA, but I can trade that CDN $20 bill at a bank for an AUD $20 note, and use that. Thankfully, the Bank of Australia recognizes my home currency, and does not require it to be changed into something else first (e.g. US dollars or UK pounds). Never had a problem changing Canadian dollars into Australian dollars at any Australian bank.

-- Both countries are huge in area, while sparsely populated. Like Canada, Australia's population is concentrated in the cities. I did discover a number of towns and villages in the Australian hinterland, however--it is not the blank slate one sees on the maps.

-- Both countries share a political inheritance from the UK: rule of law, legal and other rights, and a parliamentary government. Somewhat similarly, both are federated countries (like the US), with a separation of powers between state/provincial and federal governments.

Differences:

-- First, the obvious one: Aussies drive on the left. Canadians, like Americans, drive on the right. I managed in Australia, but that's the best I can admit. I did get used to it, but it wasn't easy at first.

-- Next, the differences in sports. Aussies seem to be mad for cricket, rugby, and Aussie Rules Football (AFL). All very well and good, but in Canada, it's ice hockey, Canadian football, American football, American baseball (Toronto has a team in the US leagues), and yet more ice hockey. In fact, calling it "ice hockey" in Canada will get you some dirty looks, as Canadians believe that the only true hockey is the game played on ice, while the game played on grass with curved sticks is an aberration. Aussies, and other countries where field hockey is played, disagree. At any rate, few Canadians know cricket, rugby, field hockey, and AFL, and even fewer play them. Most Canadians play (real ) hockey, CFL/NFL football, baseball, and variations on the above.

-- On a more personal note, I found Aussies to be much more friendly than Canadians. And I say that as a Canadian. I had no trouble striking up a conversation with an Aussie in an Aussie pub; I've had a hard time doing the same in a Canadian pub.
How do Aussies deal with being around a Canadian? Ask a lot of questions or something?
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Old 01-01-2013, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,590 posts, read 2,067,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
How do Aussies deal with being around a Canadian? Ask a lot of questions or something?
There were questions, sure. Mostly having to do with weather--how do we deal with all that snow, and constant cold? But of course, we don't have constant cold, and we deal with snow. All the times I was in Australia were in the Aussie winter, which (to me), wasn't winter at all. The Aussies were surprised that I wasn't bundled up, and asked about it.

Other than that, conversations were pretty normal. True, I wasn't up on Aussie sports, but we could talk about current events, the weather, and such things as TV and movies. I enjoyed my times in Australia, and hope to return someday.
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:22 AM
 
25,058 posts, read 24,898,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
There were questions, sure. Mostly having to do with weather--how do we deal with all that snow, and constant cold? But of course, we don't have constant cold, and we deal with snow. All the times I was in Australia were in the Aussie winter, which (to me), wasn't winter at all. The Aussies were surprised that I wasn't bundled up, and asked about it.

Other than that, conversations were pretty normal. True, I wasn't up on Aussie sports, but we could talk about current events, the weather, and such things as TV and movies. I enjoyed my times in Australia, and hope to return someday.
Lol, is that all they ask? I get asked a barrage of the usual questions, none to do with the weather. It's always about firearms (I've been asked before how many guns do I own, not do you own a gun lol), Republicans, Southerners, Hollywood, Disney, and NYC. I'm guessing people think Canada is a big standard country, very similar to their own while the US is bizarro world
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Old 01-01-2013, 06:13 AM
 
2,421 posts, read 6,513,154 times
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Australia and Canada are pretty much like Twins. Our geographic locations and few cultural differences, are the only things that set us apart.
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Old 01-01-2013, 07:14 AM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,716,109 times
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I really wish I could get a work visa to Canada. Pretty much EVERYTHING is way too expensive in Australia, plus the geographical isolation from other continents.
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Old 01-03-2013, 08:09 AM
 
2,096 posts, read 4,173,232 times
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Canada is cold, Australia is warm
Canada is 'feminine', Australia is 'masculine'
People in both countries are surprisingly reserved I've heard, though I find them to be friendly
Canada is somewhat more religious than Australia but also more left wing
Both countries have British pasts but have become more like the US in recent decades
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Old 01-03-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,873 posts, read 19,039,995 times
Reputation: 9194
Its good to see Canada finally found another country to compare themselves to.
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