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Old 02-02-2013, 08:46 AM
 
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What are these areas REALLY like, culturally, socially, economically, linguistically, etc...?
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Old 02-03-2013, 02:50 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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I'm unsure why you are asking this question.

Atlantic Canada is much like the US Northeast. Of course, Saint John, Charlottetown, and Halifax (for example) are no NYC. But they are nice cities in their own respects.

As for Northern Quebec--well, you should ask the Cree, who (as I understand) occupy most of it.

But your question is like trying to compare Senegal with Italy: each is a fine country in its own right, but they are very different, and no useful comparison can really be made.

Perhaps you can redefine your question.
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Old 02-03-2013, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Northern Quebec is a pretty big area generally. The inland French speaking parts go up to the Val-d'Or area with lots of little mining towns, after that, in the James Bay area, the people are almost all Cree and speak Cree in day to day life, with English as a second language because the Hudson's Bay company was really the only European group ever active in this region (it was never under French control). North of the Cree, in the Tundra, are various Inuit towns, and they're in a similar position to the Cree, although the two groups historically have some bad blood going on. Along the North Shore of Quebec up to Labrador the area is spotted with little fishing villages, on hard times these days since the fisheries in the bay of St. Lawrence collpased. The collapse of the fisheries due to overfishing has had a devastating impact on the fishing based of economy of small town Newfoundland, North Shore Quebec, and the Coastal Maritime provinces and is part of the reason these areas aren't doing great economically, that and not having any big cities (Halifax and St. John's are doing relatively okay and the gains made have been here, but they are small places that haven't been able to lift the region out of har times). North Shore Quebec is a mixture of Innu speaking reserves, villages of old stock Anglophone Metis people from centuries back who speak an English that sounds a bit like Newfoundland English, and French towns in the southern portion.

Newfoundland is a great province, very old, used to be its own country before it joined Canada, many unique traditions. Not alot of people there in such a big landmass and lots of the little outports are suffering since the fisheries colllpased, like I said. St. John's is booming because of offshore oil that's been turing things around for Newfoundland.

Nova Scotia's the most populous Atlantic province with the biggest city, Halifax. It's a nice place, lots of universities and military stuff there, and soon they'll be building 30 billion dollars worth of new navy ships. Not Canada's most prosperous city, but a good, decent place none the less. The Maritimes in general is about small towns and its very charming, very friendly, and very rooted in its long history, with a strong sense of local identity.

PEI is Canada's smallest province and grows potatos and is very scenic and pastoral. The dirt is red, Anne of Green Gables is everywhere, and Charlottetown was the birthplace of Confederation.

New Brunswick has three about equally sized cities of ~100K, Moncton, Fredericton, and Saint John (different from St.John's, the capital of Newfoundland). Less of a percentage of people are living in coastal settlements here. Pulp and Paper, call centres, hunting, and 1/3 of the people are French speaking Acadian people, a distinct Francophone Canadian group from "Canadiens" who live in Quebec and all points west, who were the original European inhabitants of the Maritimes and who live in all three Maritime provinces. NB is Canada's only bilingual province. The Acadians are usually able to speak impressive levels of English, although the local Anglos are on the whole depressingly bad at French, unlike the Anglo-Quebecois who are living a different bilingual reality. The Irving family basically owns the place.

Anything in particular you wanted to know? That was an embarassingly brief summary of several centuries and millenia old peoples in five provinces with more to them than a poster could possibly say in response to such a very broad question.

Last edited by BIMBAM; 02-03-2013 at 03:43 AM..
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Old 02-05-2013, 08:27 PM
 
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Thank you for your responses. I may be in a position for an extended trip or even possible relocation to Canada in the coming months and these were the areas we discussed. Until I have the opportunity to actually visit, I wanted to see the various opinions on these areas.
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Old 02-05-2013, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA Yankee View Post
Thank you for your responses. I may be in a position for an extended trip or even possible relocation to Canada in the coming months and these were the areas we discussed. Until I have the opportunity to actually visit, I wanted to see the various opinions on these areas.
What features attract you to these areas? Are you just looking at small towns and sparsely settled areas? Are you looking for coastal regions? Life out there tends to be simple, there's all the necessities but sometimes luxuries and fancy things aren't so easy to come by.
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