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Old 03-01-2013, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,540,438 times
Reputation: 11937

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Absolutely shocking when you consider this absolutely never happens (with other languages) in places where the local language is English!
LOL. I guess it is in how it is done. The assumption that the person behind the counter speaks english is what would set most people off.
My dear departed grandmother who spoke french had a story of a woman yelling at a woman behind a ticket counter in a train station in Paris, insisting the woman behind the counter spoke english but just refused to do so.
She simply could not understand that maybe, just maybe she didn't... and people call the french arrogant!!
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Old 03-02-2013, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 273,774 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
LOL. I guess it is in how it is done. The assumption that the person behind the counter speaks english is what would set most people off.
My dear departed grandmother who spoke french had a story of a woman yelling at a woman behind a ticket counter in a train station in Paris, insisting the woman behind the counter spoke english but just refused to do so.
She simply could not understand that maybe, just maybe she didn't... and people call the french arrogant!!
I think the issue is that in a non English country if you spoke in English and the person behind the counter didn't they would look at you either with a blank face or maybe say apologetically "I'm sorry I don't understand"/ "Je ne comprend pas"...they would not shout at you and say "We only speak Spanish here!!!" or "We only speak German here!"
It's quite a different attitude.
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Old 03-02-2013, 03:53 AM
 
1,463 posts, read 3,266,107 times
Reputation: 2828
Quote:
Originally Posted by hystericblue View Post
This has probably been discussed several times but just how different is the culture and demographics in Quebec and Montreal from that of areas like BC and Ontario?
As i often heard, English Canadians are polite but very reserved whereas French Canadians are quite the opposite such that they can be more hospitable and warm compared to the former.
Is it true?
Don't know if the above is true..after all does ones "heritage" determine how polite and hospitable they are?? Think about people in general and you will more than likely find that there are rude and unhospitable folks of all sorts out there and warm and friendly people of all races and ethnic backgrounds. I am sure the biggest difference is that one probably speaks good English and the other barely understands it. By the way...did you know that English..American English is one of the hardest languages of all to learn and someone who doesn't speak or understand could easily be misunderstood as being rude and unhospitable.
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Old 03-02-2013, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 273,774 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pammyd View Post
Don't know if the above is true..after all does ones "heritage" determine how polite and hospitable they are?? Think about people in general and you will more than likely find that there are rude and unhospitable folks of all sorts out there and warm and friendly people of all races and ethnic backgrounds. I am sure the biggest difference is that one probably speaks good English and the other barely understands it. By the way...did you know that English..American English is one of the hardest languages of all to learn and someone who doesn't speak or understand could easily be misunderstood as being rude and unhospitable.
I thought it was widely known that English is one of the easiest languages to learn - I agree that it might be hard to perfect 100% due to some strange rules and pronunciations.

Last edited by qwertyjjj; 03-02-2013 at 05:18 AM..
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,316,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthYorkEd View Post
I've been to Quebec many, many times, and though this comment might come across as way over-generalized, I've basically found the following differences:

- An Anglo will not mock or demean a non-English person trying to converse or communicate with them in English. They will admire the effort and usually help them work through it.

- A Francophone *might* laugh in your face, smirk, or answer you in English if you make an attempt to speak their language. It might not be intended to condescend, ridicule, or come across as mean-spirited, but it is often interpreted that way. Most likely a result of overprotectionism and too much "us against them" sentiment in their culture. The *might* gives some people pause and makes them feel overly self-conscious about trying out their skills.

That being said, people are people, and you get a mix of good and bad everywhere.

I think the best description comes from the Onion's description of languages in Canada:

English: spoken
French: muttered
Hmmm. That certainly hasn't been my experience as a non-Anglo, non-Francophone.

And I've not found the second part to be true either, in my subjective experience.
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Old 03-02-2013, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,540,438 times
Reputation: 11937
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
I thought it was widely known that English is one of the easiest languages to learn - I agree that it might be hard to perfect 100% due to some strange rules and pronunciations.
English is actually very difficult to learn because to every rule we have exceptions. Also unlike some languages pronunciation can be confusing. There a quite a few poems about it. Here is one of my favourites.


I take it you already know
Of tough and bough and cough and dough?
Others may stumble, but not you,
On hiccough, thorough, lough and through?
Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,
To learn of less familiar traps?
Beware of heard, a dreadful word
That looks like beard and sounds like bird,
And dead: it's said like bed, not bead -
For goodness sake don't call it deed!
Watch out for meat and great and threat
(They rhyme with suite and straight and debt).
A moth is not a moth in mother,
Nor both in bother, broth in brother,
And here is not a match for there
Nor dear and fear for bear and pear,
And then there's dose and rose and lose -
Just look them up - and goose and choose,
And cork and work and card and ward,
And font and front and word and sword,
And do and go and thwart and cart -
Come, come, I've hardly made a start!
A dreadful language? Man alive!
I'd mastered it when I was five!
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Old 03-03-2013, 03:00 AM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 273,774 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
English is actually very difficult to learn because to every rule we have exceptions. Also unlike some languages pronunciation can be confusing. There a quite a few poems about it. Here is one of my favourites.


I take it you already know
Of tough and bough and cough and dough?
Others may stumble, but not you,
On hiccough, thorough, lough and through?
Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,
To learn of less familiar traps?
Beware of heard, a dreadful word
That looks like beard and sounds like bird,
And dead: it's said like bed, not bead -
For goodness sake don't call it deed!
Watch out for meat and great and threat
(They rhyme with suite and straight and debt).
A moth is not a moth in mother,
Nor both in bother, broth in brother,
And here is not a match for there
Nor dear and fear for bear and pear,
And then there's dose and rose and lose -
Just look them up - and goose and choose,
And cork and work and card and ward,
And font and front and word and sword,
And do and go and thwart and cart -
Come, come, I've hardly made a start!
A dreadful language? Man alive!
I'd mastered it when I was five!
Yes, that's true but I think that's why English might be difficult to master but is in fact very easy to learn the basics, the verbs, we have no conjugation like other languages. Anyone can get by very very easily in English and learn it quickly even if you know that they are not fluent.
The Dutch and Eastern Europeans are practically fluent at speaking it, so are many Asians.
Quote:
With English, I feel that it is an easy language to pick up at the start. Many students can start speaking it fairly quickly and progress rapidly through the early stages. this might be because it seems not to have the complexity and abundance of grammatical rules that many languages have.
However, this is also one of its difficulties; having mastered the basics of English, many students then find it hard to reach the very high levels, because there are so many exceptions to everything and so many funny little rules.
[LEFT]Read more at http://www.usingenglish.com/weblog/a...b8qppWwhgiu.99

[/LEFT]

Anyway, we'll agree to disagree

Last edited by qwertyjjj; 03-03-2013 at 04:28 AM..
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Old 03-03-2013, 10:51 PM
 
154 posts, read 197,729 times
Reputation: 61
Quebecers would rather and do visit the U.S. more often than rest of Canada.
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Old 03-04-2013, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,865 posts, read 10,522,039 times
Reputation: 5504
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScandicA View Post
Quebecers would rather and do visit the U.S. more often than rest of Canada.
I'd argue that's true of most English Canadians to, and if you deny it, look at how often people actually do vacation in the States vs. Canada.
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:11 AM
 
1,482 posts, read 2,383,786 times
Reputation: 943
The language situation in Canada is really very similar to that of Catalunia and Spain or the Basqye countries and both Spain and France as well as another dozen places on eath where a local language dominates a certain part of a country. It's always a source of friction but more for political reasons than actual linquistic reasons.

What's frustrationg isn't the locals speaking in their own language, we knew that before we went there or at least any intelligent being should have been aware of the situation. The frustrating thing is for example, my daughter moved to Barcelona from Madrid. Everyone spoke to her in Catalan in the beginning so she learned it, Afterwards when ever she would speak to someone or answer a questioni n Catalan they would switch to Castellano. Talk about "mala leche."
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