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Old 01-11-2021, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
17,219 posts, read 12,748,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
It wasn't a movie theater...a event produced by the University of British Columbia.



I don't know, would Canadian content laws apply??
Most likely not.

We have film festivals in all sorts of venues, where most if not all the films are foreign.
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Old 01-11-2021, 07:44 PM
509
 
5,275 posts, read 5,802,318 times
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I remember the first two "features" were sponsored by the Canadian Film Board.



I had just immigrated to Canada, so was unaware about Canadian content law until later. I assume since the "two" features were sponsored by the Canadian Film Board they were there to meet Canadian content laws.



I am ok with Canadian content law if it means I get to hear Ian Tyson on the radio.
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Old 01-11-2021, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,183 posts, read 2,598,254 times
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Canadian content ("Cancon") regulations only apply to broadcasters: radio and TV. Not to film festivals, art galleries, music festivals, or print media. Especially with the latter, for example, Canadian subscribers to Time and Sports Illustrated magazines (among others) do not get a special edition with a prescribed amount of Canadian content--they get the American version. Same for Canadian subscribers to the Economist or the Guardian--they get the UK versions.

Broadcasters, however, are another matter. When it started back in the 1980s, MTV was not allowed on Canadian TV because it did not have enough Canadian content. Responding to that niche that needed to be filled, CityTV created "MuchMusic," which was basically MTV with enough Canadian music videos to make the regulators happy.

Later, there was discussion about whether Sirius and XM satellite radio services would be allowed in Canada, since they had little to no Cancon. They responded by including Canadian channels in their lineup (mostly news and public affairs), and were allowed to broadcast to Canadian subscribers. Plus, they made an effort to include internationally-known Canadian artists (Gordon Lightfoot, the Guess Who, Rush, for example) on their other music channels.

But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to. My cable package includes CBC, CTV, and Global; but I also get ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, and Fox. I also get CNN, NFL Network, BBC America, and a bunch of others that have little to no Canadian content of any kind. It seems that as long as Cancon choices are available on a service, such as cable or satellite radio, the regulators are fine with it. But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to.
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Old 01-12-2021, 05:31 AM
 
Location: ottawa, ontario, canada
1,716 posts, read 883,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post

But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to. My cable package includes CBC, CTV, and Global; but I also get ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, and Fox. I also get CNN, NFL Network, BBC America, and a bunch of others that have little to no Canadian content of any kind. It seems that as long as Cancon choices are available on a service, such as cable or satellite radio, the regulators are fine with it. But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to.
so what you are saying is nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to
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Old 01-12-2021, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
17,219 posts, read 12,748,953 times
Reputation: 10681
Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
I remember the first two "features" were sponsored by the Canadian Film Board.



I had just immigrated to Canada, so was unaware about Canadian content law until later. I assume since the "two" features were sponsored by the Canadian Film Board they were there to meet Canadian content laws.



I am ok with Canadian content law if it means I get to hear Ian Tyson on the radio.
It's a different world now though.

The internet changed everything.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwgn...zvy5rHDBfiHIB6
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Old 01-12-2021, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,730 posts, read 33,941,945 times
Reputation: 10816
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Canadian content ("Cancon") regulations only apply to broadcasters: radio and TV. Not to film festivals, art galleries, music festivals, or print media. Especially with the latter, for example, Canadian subscribers to Time and Sports Illustrated magazines (among others) do not get a special edition with a prescribed amount of Canadian content--they get the American version. Same for Canadian subscribers to the Economist or the Guardian--they get the UK versions.

Broadcasters, however, are another matter. When it started back in the 1980s, MTV was not allowed on Canadian TV because it did not have enough Canadian content. Responding to that niche that needed to be filled, CityTV created "MuchMusic," which was basically MTV with enough Canadian music videos to make the regulators happy.

Later, there was discussion about whether Sirius and XM satellite radio services would be allowed in Canada, since they had little to no Cancon. They responded by including Canadian channels in their lineup (mostly news and public affairs), and were allowed to broadcast to Canadian subscribers. Plus, they made an effort to include internationally-known Canadian artists (Gordon Lightfoot, the Guess Who, Rush, for example) on their other music channels.

But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to. My cable package includes CBC, CTV, and Global; but I also get ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, and Fox. I also get CNN, NFL Network, BBC America, and a bunch of others that have little to no Canadian content of any kind. It seems that as long as Cancon choices are available on a service, such as cable or satellite radio, the regulators are fine with it. But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to.
I believe CanCon once did have a somewhat bigger reach, though.

For example, US specialty channels were not allowed in Canada for quite some time. I recall HBO not being available in Canada for example.

This was especially true for market segments where there was already a Canadian equivalent channel, that CRTC regulations protected.

So ESPN was never allowed into Canada in order to protect TSN, and MTV was banned to protect MuchMusic.

But Arts and Entertainment (A&E) was allowed in Canada as there was no Canadian equivalent, and perhaps also because there were no concrete plans to set one up at the time.

I don't believe there ever was any form of CanCon in movie theatres, though the government did support domestic feature films through funding organizations like Telefilm Canada. Their efforts on this front were considerably more successful with French-language productions than with English-language ones.

There was also a form of CanCon Lite with magazines for a while, IIRC. "Canadian" magazines were eligible for subsidies of some kind, and so certain U.S. magazines (thinking of Time, which definitely did) produced so-called Canadian editions at one point, with often little to no Canadian content except for the Canadian ads that replaced the American ones.
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Old 01-13-2021, 12:56 AM
 
7,359 posts, read 4,198,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipcat View Post
I've noticed a pretty big difference in fashion between Seattle and Vancouver when I traveled over there last month. It seems Vancouverites have more European flair to thier styles, compared to Seattle where the locals mainly dressed in grungier/plainer type of way and not as stylistic as Vancouverites. But Vancouver probally doesn't represent what Canadians dress like throughout the country.

Are Canadians more fashion concious than Americans on average?
I don't know whether it's fair to call Canadian fashion "European flair," as that is a style independent of Canada. USA protests showed the world USA style and, I don't mean to be rude, but regarding women it seems to be 300 pounds in lululemons - bit of a misfit. That's not grunge or plain, that's unpleasant. Fashion can do better!

Just like West Coast USA, Canada West Coast is more laid back and red neck hippy than uppity Eastern Canada.
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:13 AM
 
7,359 posts, read 4,198,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
I'd like to see a debate between you and the american poster we had a little while ago who was absolutely convinced "going out in sweatpants" was a typical canadian thing. i guess it's all perspective really?
It's hard for the USA to realize that they are another country, not the country - other places have more class, democracy, respect for the autonomy of others, rights, freedoms and better fashion.
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:31 AM
 
7,359 posts, read 4,198,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipcat View Post
Seattle is only 3 hours from Vancouver, BC in a similar climate, so there's going to be more comparison s than somewhere distant like Miami, which has a completely different climate. Just going to both Seattle and Vancouver, the differences jump at me.
Don't teens in Seattle and Miami dress the same? The USA is not European Flair or Milan Runway, it's USA casual - which is commonly interpreted as 300 pounds wearing Lululemon, ball cap and gun.

The similarity between Seattle and Miami doesn't jump. Fashion trends are global, so no longer easily recognized as coming from a specific country or region. What is different is not about fashion, but moreso about level of slobbery. Wearing sweats / pyjamas seems common at USA Walmart, not so much in Canada.

Maybe it's about having dignity and respect with others.
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:35 AM
 
7,359 posts, read 4,198,657 times
Reputation: 7544
Quote:
Originally Posted by drknoble View Post
I didn't know you embraced the culture of shunning statistics.

And according to CNN, the US is 8th in the world for best dressed ahead of Canada.

World's best-dressed nations -- and how to fit in | CNN Travel
What does that mean - that too many people in the USA wander around wearing sweats, but more Canadians do it, or more people in the USA wear Milan Runway?

Does best dressed relate to fashion design or self-respect and dressing a bit better?
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