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Old 01-13-2021, 02:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Snort View Post
However, it's been scientifically proven through many research projects that their penises are only one quarter the size of the average American's.
Proud to be an American!
- maga
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Old 01-13-2021, 05:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
I don't know whether it's fair to call Canadian fashion "European flair," as that is a style independent of Canada. USA protests showed the world USA style and, I don't mean to be rude, but regarding women it seems to be 300 pounds in lululemons - bit of a misfit. That's not grunge or plain, that's unpleasant. Fashion can do better!

Just like West Coast USA, Canada West Coast is more laid back and red neck hippy than uppity Eastern Canada.
The only place I’ve seen a consistent hint of true fashion in Canada is in Montreal. And in Toronto, perhaps more upscale casual. In the US, same applies to Manhattan. LA is also trendy and more upscale. Miami too in its own way.

But I’d say that you’d get a similar fashion sense comparing any suburban Canadian city with its equivalent in the US.

BTW, 2/3 of Canadians are now overweight or obese, not that far behind Americans, so the stereotypes aren’t accurate anymore. You’re just as likely to see a Canadian stuffing themselves into Lululemon nowadays.
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Old 01-13-2021, 11:11 AM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,192 posts, read 11,707,169 times
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Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
The only place I’ve seen a consistent hint of true fashion in Canada is in Montreal. And in Toronto, perhaps more upscale casual. In the US, same applies to Manhattan. LA is also trendy and more upscale. Miami too in its own way.

But I’d say that you’d get a similar fashion sense comparing any suburban Canadian city with its equivalent in the US.

BTW, 2/3 of Canadians are now overweight or obese, not that far behind Americans, so the stereotypes aren’t accurate anymore. You’re just as likely to see a Canadian stuffing themselves into Lululemon nowadays.
I think you are probably right about Montreal. I say 'probably' because I've never been there and seen it with my own eyes. But I've encountered a lot of Montrealers who have been here visiting the west coast and every one of them would easily stand out in the average crowd of usually casually dressed west coasters. Always really well dressed and stylish enough to make heads turn, even right down to the styles of clothing and accoutrements that they choose for their infants and older children when they're stepping out in public with them and their fashionably stylish dog for a Sunday afternoon walk in the woods or at the beach. I could not dress myself the same way (and I wouldn't want to) but I do still admire the Montrealers' sense of high style and fashion and pride of appearance.

Re: the obesity thing, that's correct too - now it's 64% of the total population in Canada is overweight but it's not spread out evenly across the country. Some cities or regions in each province have more overweight people than other cities or regions in the same province, and then some provinces have more overweight people than other provinces and a couple of provinces are downright lean and emaciated (but healthy and active) compared to all the others. I think obesity in Canada ties in with being a locational and occupational thing, with there being more overweight folks living in city settings and doing sedentary jobs compared to people who live in country settings and are more physically active in their occupations. Also, overweightness in Canada is a seasonal thing too. People pack on pounds and lose muscle tone in the winter and then lose pounds and gain muscle tone after winter.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 01-13-2021 at 11:29 AM..
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Old 01-13-2021, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
The only place I’ve seen a consistent hint of true fashion in Canada is in Montreal. And in Toronto, perhaps more upscale casual. In the US, same applies to Manhattan. LA is also trendy and more upscale. Miami too in its own way.

But I’d say that you’d get a similar fashion sense comparing any suburban Canadian city with its equivalent in the US.

BTW, 2/3 of Canadians are now overweight or obese, not that far behind Americans, so the stereotypes aren’t accurate anymore. You’re just as likely to see a Canadian stuffing themselves into Lululemon nowadays.
I've noticed a lot of sites throw those two together. Overweight and obese are not the same thing.

In the US.

"The National Center for Health Statistics at the CDC showed in their most up to date statistics that 42.4% of U.S. adults were obese as of 2017-2018 (43% for men and 41.9% for women).[7] "

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesit..._United_States

In Canada.

"According to Statistics Canada, 61.3% of adult Canadians were overweight or obese in 2015. The percentage of those who were obese rose to 26.7%, up from 23.1% in 2004. There was some good news when it came to younger Canadians: the percentage of children and youth who were obese dropped to 12% from 13.3%."

https://www.cmaj.ca/content/189/37/E1202

There are three categories for obesity apparently, the third known as severe or morbidly obese is where I'd like to find some more, stats. Don't have time right now, but my anecdotal experiences says there are a lot more severely obese people in the US. I just see many more people in the US who because of weight can't even walk. However, like I said, stats would help.

What we can say is the obesity is an ever increasing problem in both countries.
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Old 01-13-2021, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I think you are probably right about Montreal. I say 'probably' because I've never been there and seen it with my own eyes. But I've encountered a lot of Montrealers who have been here visiting the west coast and every one of them would easily stand out in the average crowd of usually casually dressed west coasters. Always really well dressed and stylish enough to make heads turn, even right down to the styles of clothing and accoutrements that they choose for their infants and older children when they're stepping out in public with them and their fashionably stylish dog for a Sunday afternoon walk in the woods or at the beach. I could not dress myself the same way (and I wouldn't want to) but I do still admire the Montrealers' sense of high style and fashion and pride of appearance.

Re: the obesity thing, that's correct too - now it's 64% of the total population in Canada is overweight but it's not spread out evenly across the country. Some cities or regions in each province have more overweight people than other cities or regions in the same province, and then some provinces have more overweight people than other provinces and a couple of provinces are downright lean and emaciated (but healthy and active) compared to all the others. I think obesity in Canada ties in with being a locational and occupational thing, with there being more overweight folks living in city settings and doing sedentary jobs compared to people who live in country settings and are more physically active in their occupations. Also, overweightness in Canada is a seasonal thing too. People pack on pounds and lose muscle tone in the winter and then lose pounds and gain muscle tone after winter.

.
I think it's more complicated than that.

Naturally people who are doing physical work will fitter, but many people in cities and suburbs do very physical work. How many k's does a server walk in a shift? How much energy do people repairing roads expend etc.
Those groceries and goods delivered to loading bays of stores have people lifting them and stocking them.

These are generalities of course and yes it depends on location, but if it were simply rural vs city then why does BC where the majority of people live in a city or suburbs, have the lowest obesity rate in all of Canada at 16 percent, and the NWT which is not urban at all, has the highest at 37.7 percent?
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I think it's more complicated than that.

Naturally people who are doing physical work will fitter, but many people in cities and suburbs do very physical work. How many k's does a server walk in a shift? How much energy do people repairing roads expend etc.
Those groceries and goods delivered to loading bays of stores have people lifting them and stocking them.

These are generalities of course and yes it depends on location, but if it were simply rural vs city then why does BC where the majority of people live in a city or suburbs, have the lowest obesity rate in all of Canada at 16 percent, and the NWT which is not urban at all, has the highest at 37.7 percent?
My anecdotal experience is that people in rural area of the US are heavier than those in very urban environments. The cities tend to have wider and better (healthier) food options, more of a culture of exercise and fitness, and, perhaps surprisingly, more options for outdoor recreation.

I have a sister who lives in an unincorporated area of Oklahoma. There are no sidewalks and no shoulders on the two-lane highway. In order to take a walk or ride a bike without risking life and limb, she needs to get in the car and drive twenty minutes to a park. It's a hassle, so no one does it very much. What's more, there are no stores or restaurants of any kind within walking distance of her neighborhood.

On the other hand, I live in a Los Angeles suburb, but all the streets have sidewalks (easy to take a walk in any direction), there are many stores and restaurants within a ten minutes' walk, and I'm a few blocks from a wilderness park with trails where I ride my mountain bike. When I visit Oklahoma, it's immediately noticeable that the average person is heavier there than in SoCal.

People in big cities where most rely on public transportation are even slimmer, because they walk so much.
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I think you are probably right about Montreal. I say 'probably' because I've never been there and seen it with my own eyes. But I've encountered a lot of Montrealers who have been here visiting the west coast and every one of them would easily stand out in the average crowd of usually casually dressed west coasters. Always really well dressed and stylish enough to make heads turn, even right down to the styles of clothing and accoutrements that they choose for their infants and older children when they're stepping out in public with them and their fashionably stylish dog for a Sunday afternoon walk in the woods or at the beach. I could not dress myself the same way (and I wouldn't want to) but I do still admire the Montrealers' sense of high style and fashion and pride of appearance.


.
Montreal and Quebec definitely have their share of slobs.

But one thing I might say is that the way people dress does seem to correlate more with social class here.

In other places I find even white collar professionals tend to dress down in an often extreme way when not working.

I am not saying that upper middle class people go to the grocery store in 3-piece-suits on Saturday, but as I said, they do dress somewhat smartly, as you'd expect based on social class.

A by-product of this I've mentioned before here or on another forum, is that people often treat you differently depending on how you're dressed.

I don't generally dress like a slob, but when it happens (i.e. wearing geeky shorts, a t-shirt and white socks and sneakers, dishevelled hair, e.g. coming back from a ball hockey game), if I stop somewhere, often the exact same staff aren't especially nice, as they are if I am dressed well.
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Old 01-13-2021, 04:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Montreal and Quebec definitely have their share of slobs.

But one thing I might say is that the way people dress does seem to correlate more with social class here.

In other places I find even white collar professionals tend to dress down in an often extreme way when not working.

I am not saying that upper middle class people go to the grocery store in 3-piece-suits on Saturday, but as I said, they do dress somewhat smartly, as you'd expect based on social class.

A by-product of this I've mentioned before here or on another forum, is that people often treat you differently depending on how you're dressed.

I don't generally dress like a slob, but when it happens (i.e. wearing geeky shorts, a t-shirt and white socks and sneakers, dishevelled hair, e.g. coming back from a ball hockey game), if I stop somewhere, often the exact same staff aren't especially nice, as they are if I am dressed well.
I don’t doubt it, but whenever I traveled to Montreal or Quebec City for work I found my colleagues more stylishly dressed as well as those at the customer site. Sometimes it wasn’t as much what they wore, but it fit better, a better cut, or nicer fabric.

In New York you get the NYC suit and the Long Island suit look. Both are suits, but one is worn well and the other looks more sloppy.
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Old 01-13-2021, 05:42 PM
509
 
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Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Canadian content ("Cancon") regulations only apply to broadcasters: radio and TV. Not to film festivals, art galleries, music festivals, or print media. Especially with the latter, for example, Canadian subscribers to Time and Sports Illustrated magazines (among others) do not get a special edition with a prescribed amount of Canadian content--they get the American version. Same for Canadian subscribers to the Economist or the Guardian--they get the UK versions.

Broadcasters, however, are another matter. When it started back in the 1980s, MTV was not allowed on Canadian TV because it did not have enough Canadian content. Responding to that niche that needed to be filled, CityTV created "MuchMusic," which was basically MTV with enough Canadian music videos to make the regulators happy.

Later, there was discussion about whether Sirius and XM satellite radio services would be allowed in Canada, since they had little to no Cancon. They responded by including Canadian channels in their lineup (mostly news and public affairs), and were allowed to broadcast to Canadian subscribers. Plus, they made an effort to include internationally-known Canadian artists (Gordon Lightfoot, the Guess Who, Rush, for example) on their other music channels.

But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to. My cable package includes CBC, CTV, and Global; but I also get ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS, and Fox. I also get CNN, NFL Network, BBC America, and a bunch of others that have little to no Canadian content of any kind. It seems that as long as Cancon choices are available on a service, such as cable or satellite radio, the regulators are fine with it. But nobody is forced to consume Cancon if they don't want to.

I have no problem with Canadian content laws.



As long as you don't count Neil Young since he became an American. Ian Tyson, well he is a real Canadian.



For a nation to survive they need a cultural identity. Canada being so close to the US and a Democratic Republic?? really has to maintain a separate identity from the US.



Cultural content allows that to happen....and I really like Ian Tyson.


Thanks for your post and the explanation.
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Old 01-13-2021, 07:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by hipcat View Post
Are Canadians more fashion concious than Americans on average?
I could tell you about what my North Face jacket logo *really* means, but then . . .
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