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Old 05-23-2013, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
No chit Sherlock! You did pick from the two polar opposite extreme ends of the intellectual spectrum though didn't you?
Nothing like illustrating one's point clearly!
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I am a federalist too but I don't see the connection between between pro-Canada or pro-federalism and being more ''wordly''. I know plenty of rubes (including French speakers, English speakers, and people inside and outside Quebec) who are pro-Canada and I know lots of sophisticated, worldly people who are for Quebec's independence.

Like them or not, separatists like Jean-François Lisée and Bernard Landry are infinitely more worldly, sophisticated and intelligent than someone like Don Cherry who is extremely pro-Canada.
I did not mean to suggest that all separatists are not wordly, just that travel can, for some, put things at home into perspective.
My personal experience with my grandmother, and an ex of mine who was a separatist while attending university commented how leaving Quebec to live and travel changed their own views on separatism. My ex was taught that the ROC of Canada hated Quebeckers etc. This belief did influence their own thoughts on separatism. Once they travelled the rest of the country they realized that this was not true and they started questioning the whole thing and came to the conclusion, that it would not be in the interests of Quebec to leave. This realization was the catalyst for re-examining the whole question for them, not the main reason of their belief in separatism.
Also, from the political maps of riding in Quebec, has separatism been supported more in non-urban areas?
If that is the case, then the argument can be made, that urbanites tend to be more worldly? Not just by travel, but by the day to day interaction with a variety of types and ideas that those who don't live in a city are exposed to on a daily basis.
Again, this is NOT saying that all rural folk aren't wordily. This is a generalization, there are always exceptions.
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
Reputation: 11650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I did not mean to suggest that all separatists are not wordly, just that travel can, for some, put things at home into perspective.
My personal experience with my grandmother, and an ex of mine who was a separatist while attending university commented how leaving Quebec to live and travel changed their own views on separatism. My ex was taught that the ROC of Canada hated Quebeckers etc. This belief did influence their own thoughts on separatism. Once they travelled the rest of the country they realized that this was not true and they started questioning the whole thing and came to the conclusion, that it would not be in the interests of Quebec to leave. This realization was the catalyst for re-examining the whole question for them, not the main reason of their belief in separatism.
Though I have always remained a federalist, if anything travelling abroad and getting to know other countries has weakened my resolve. I grew up in a francophone family *outside* Quebec, and this community tends to be one of the hardest-core federalist constituencies. Pretty much my entire family and everyone I know is extremely pro-Canada, federalist, Trudeauist, and anti-separatist. Quebec separatists are seen as borderline satanic. OK maybe I am exaggerating. A bit.

Anyway, travelling abroad as a francophone Canadian federalist I saw independent countries much smaller than Quebec like Denmark and Norway with high levels of cultural security. They were entirely *themselves* at home, and yet open to the world as well. They were remarkably relaxed about such things - perhaps it was because they were independent and didn't have the feeling they were being bossed around by someone else?

And then I went to Catalonia in Spain and saw that their situation (linguistically and culturally) was similar but even slightly worse than than ours. They had brought their language back and out of the kitchens where it had been relegated by Franco, but it was still tough sledding. And not lost on me was the fact that there are twice as many Catalans in Catalonia as there are Norwegians or Danes. So why is it that the latter two are in a linguistic and cultural comfort zone and the former are not?

And one day I went to Switzerland and found that the Swiss francophones who make up 17% of the country's population (compared to close to 25% francophones in Canada) also have that comfort zone (similar to that enjoyed by the Danes and Norwegians) while still being a part of a wider federation. I also later observed that the Italian-speaking Swiss also have a comfort zone, and they're not even 10% of the population of their country.

So basically - a lot of food for thought. I don't want Quebec to separate from Canada, but on the other hand I no longer think that the status quo is the be-all end-all of political set-ups in the northern half of North America. Canada as it is is pretty good - but that doesn't mean that something else mightn't be better.
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Old 05-24-2013, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
Reputation: 11650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Also, from the political maps of riding in Quebec, has separatism been supported more in non-urban areas?
If that is the case, then the argument can be made, that urbanites tend to be more worldly? Not just by travel, but by the day to day interaction with a variety of types and ideas that those who don't live in a city are exposed to on a daily basis.
Again, this is NOT saying that all rural folk aren't wordily. This is a generalization, there are always exceptions.
Montreal as whole voted against independence but the population there is very diverse. The subgroup of francophone Montrealers (arguably one of the most sophisticated and worldly demographics in Canada if not North America), had one of the highest percentages for independence. Over 70% I think.

Francophone Montrealers even voted Oui more strongly than people in the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean did, which is reputed to be a separatist stronghold.

Generally speaking support for independence among francophone Québécois increase with education levels and decrease with age. University-educated white collar people are more likely to be for separation, as are unionized people, people who are left-leaning, activists, artistically-inclined. Business owners and "self-made" people who are more conservative, as well as practising Catholics, tend to be against.
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Old 05-24-2013, 03:16 PM
 
2,869 posts, read 5,137,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Also, from the political maps of riding in Quebec, has separatism been supported more in non-urban areas?
If that is the case, then the argument can be made, that urbanites tend to be more worldly? Not just by travel, but by the day to day interaction with a variety of types and ideas that those who don't live in a city are exposed to on a daily basis.
Again, this is NOT saying that all rural folk aren't wordily. This is a generalization, there are always exceptions.
I don't think you can gain much by going that route. You can find the 1995 referendum vote by region (and among Francophones only) here. If you use the urban/rural statistics found here (2012 data but it hasn't changed much since 1995), here's the YES vote among francophones, from most urban to least urban region:

Montreal francophone YES vote 61.2%
Laval 59.6% YES
Quebec 56.3% YES
Outaouais 33.8% YES (obvious outlier given the proximity to Ottawa)
Montérégie 62.1% YES
Saguenay 70.4% YES
Mauricie-Bois-Francs 58.3% YES
Laurentides-Lanaudière 65.8% YES
Estrie 55.4% YES
Abitibi-Témiscamingue 63.9% YES
Chaudière-Appalaches 51.3% YES
Bas-Saint-Laurent-Gaspésie-Côte-Nord 64.2% YES

Not much of a pattern there.
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Old 05-24-2013, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
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The question is culture shock for americans moving to canada....
answer...

no culture shock.
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Old 08-18-2013, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,639 posts, read 18,125,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Canada is more culturally similar to America with a few odd Britishisms. In terms of accents , dialects ,words , how city looks , how buildings look and so on.

I think most of the culture shock will be is Canada it is base on a parliamentary system than a republican system in the US.

Some dialects and slang words like runners ,touque ,hydro ,faucet , cutlery / utensils , cottage , serviette , Loonie , Toonie , patro , sofa

Canadian Slang and Dialect – Amy Mahon


The accents like the diphthong OU like in house or about. In the US the diphthong is very different , to explain it to people in Canada the diphthong OU sounds like AR so when Americans say about it sounds like abart to people in Canada.

Other thing is the word dollar in the US the first syllables are stressed where in Canada it is the last syllables and the er at the end where people US do not put er at the end.

Well other word is sorry !! When people in Canada say it well it sounds like sorryeee where in the US there is no ee at the end , and it is not drawn out ee at the end that people in Canada like to do.

The Canadian raising the phenomena where it sounds like they are asking a question all the time.

The buildings looks very different in Canada than the US it has more a British feel.

The Canadian constitution and bill of rights is very different .

Even education and healthcare is different.


Note this all I can think of I'm sure others can comment on this thread and say more.
Buildings look very different? I noticed more strip malls in Winnipeg than I did almost anywhere else. They're like a fungal infection up there.

Canadian raising isn't limited to Canada, it's present in some American regional dialects as well.

City planning is a bit different, the cities there are more self-contained with less of the all-engulfing low-density sprawl than the U.S., much of which has been built since the '70s or so on reclaimed farmland. However, there is still a lot of medium-density sprawl.

Healthcare is very different, but education is about as similar to the U.S. as any other place in the world. School sports, etc.
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Old 08-19-2013, 04:27 AM
 
35,309 posts, read 52,305,052 times
Reputation: 30999
You wont feel any culture shock as all the normal American necessities are here.
MacDonalds
Pizza Hut
Walmart
Honey Boo Boo
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