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Old 06-29-2022, 04:50 PM
 
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On the other hand, Canadians have one of the highest rates of multiple sclerosis in the world--higher than Americans, and much higher (more than double) the rate of Australians. This is suspected to stem from Canadians' poor exposure to direct sunlight, which induces vitamin-D synthesis in the skin.
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Old 06-29-2022, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
On the other hand, Canadians have one of the highest rates of multiple sclerosis in the world--higher than Americans, and much higher (more than double) the rate of Australians. This is suspected to stem from Canadians' poor exposure to direct sunlight, which induces vitamin-D synthesis in the skin.
Not according to this link.

Canada has a prevalence of 250 per 100,000.

The USA has a prevalence of 288 per 100,000

Germany is high at 303 per 100,000. The Netherlands is 150 and Belgium is 104 per 100,000, which oddly is the same as Australia.

As for sunlight, no.

"The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown. It's considered an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks its own tissues. "

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-...s/syc-20350269
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Old 06-29-2022, 05:52 PM
 
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This link shows the death rate from MS. It's remarkable that the US with its "poor health care" outperforms the UK, Canada, Norway, Austria, and Ireland in this regard and is virtually tied with the Netherlands and Switzerland.

https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/...is/by-country/

Why is MS more prevalent in northern latitudes? The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation states:

Quote:
MS is a complex disease which results from the interplay between nature (genetic factors) and nurture (environmental conditions). Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing MS. Exposure to sunlight (ultraviolet radiation) can help the body to make active vitamin D.

People who live in higher geographical latitudes may receive lower levels of sunlight, and therefore have lower vitamin D levels which could explain why there is a higher incidence of MS in countries with higher latitudes.
https://www.msif.org/news/2016/12/05...er%20latitudes.
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Old 06-29-2022, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by saibot View Post
This link shows the death rate from MS. It's remarkable that the US with its "poor health care" outperforms the UK, Canada, Norway, Austria, and Ireland in this regard and is virtually tied with the Netherlands and Switzerland.

https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/...is/by-country/

Why is MS more prevalent in northern latitudes? The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation states:



https://www.msif.org/news/2016/12/05...er%20latitudes.
The difference in death rates from MS between Canada and the US is negligible. .97 compared with 1.09.

Besides that is just a desperate attempt to slag Canada, since your numbers about the prevalence being lower in the US was wrong.

While the study you list is interesting it doesn't explain why Germany has nearly 3 times the rate, than Belgium.

Countries with the same climate.

The Mayo clinic again points out that the studies done are not conclusive, but is not against people using vitamin D, but issues concerns and considers vitamin D in peoples diet as a possible factor, not just sunshine.

"Research over the years has shown that maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D may have a protective effect and lower the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of studies have shown that people who get more sun exposure and vitamin D in their diet have a lower risk of MS. Therefore, vitamin D supplementation is considered an important modifiable environmental risk factor for development of multiple sclerosis.

Some studies suggest that for people who already have MS, vitamin D may offer some benefits. These benefits include lessening the frequency and severity of their symptoms, improving quality of life, and lengthening the time it takes to progress from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis to the secondary-progressive phase. But the evidence isn't conclusive. "

As the Mayo clinic stated, the cause of MS is still unknown. If it were, a cure would be much closer.

Last edited by Natnasci; 06-29-2022 at 06:19 PM..
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Old 06-29-2022, 08:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Besides that is just a desperate attempt to slag Canada, since your numbers about the prevalence being lower in the US was wrong.
Why would I be "desperate to slag Canada"? Sorry for the slipup on prevalence rate vs death rate, but the main comparison was supposed to be between Australia (lots of sun, lots of skin cancer, lower MS) and Canada (not so much sun, not so much skin cancer, more MS). The US is in the middle. It's okay, isn't it, to observe that a factor like sunshine that may be a detriment in one regard can be a benefit in another.
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Old 06-29-2022, 09:04 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
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Originally Posted by blanic View Post
Uh, a southern peninsular portion of Canada is below the northern quarter of the US, not third. The rest of Canada’s population centers are well north. A quarter of the US is further south than northern Mexico. What is wrong with you?
The person you are responding to made correct statements. What is wrong with YOU? Perhaps you should take a look at an accurate globe of the world, not at an inaccurate flat map.

.
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Old 06-30-2022, 07:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Why would I be "desperate to slag Canada"? Sorry for the slipup on prevalence rate vs death rate, but the main comparison was supposed to be between Australia (lots of sun, lots of skin cancer, lower MS) and Canada (not so much sun, not so much skin cancer, more MS). The US is in the middle. It's okay, isn't it, to observe that a factor like sunshine that may be a detriment in one regard can be a benefit in another.
Well, firstly you are posting in the Canada section AND you did precept your statement with: "It's remarkable that the US with its "poor health care" outperforms the UK, Canada, Norway, Austria, and Ireland in this regard and is virtually tied with the Netherlands and Switzerland."

So in the interest of clarity; why is it, given that the discussions about the "poor American healthcare" predominantly, if not entirely, take place in the Americentric sections, (eg; P&OC) of this forum, that you felt the need to post this in the Canada section?

Clearly it is the Americans most upset about the quality and deliverance disparities of their healthcare. Perhaps they'd be more interested in learning about a bright spot in an American situation they are more concerned about than Canadians have proven to be.
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Old 06-30-2022, 09:21 AM
 
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I live in what is the sunniest or one of the sunniest cities in Canada. I find compared to other cities I have lived in that the people spend less time just being out in the sun when it gets above 35C because it does not get as overly hot in places like Edmonton. I sure do not and glad to have a covered deck rather than a patio.
It may be harder for us to take the hot temperature as compared to those in Australia or southern USA due to having winters in the ,+20 to -35C.
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Old 06-30-2022, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
The difference in death rates from MS between Canada and the US is negligible. .97 compared with 1.09.

Besides that is just a desperate attempt to slag Canada, since your numbers about the prevalence being lower in the US was wrong.

While the study you list is interesting it doesn't explain why Germany has nearly 3 times the rate, than Belgium.

Countries with the same climate.

The Mayo clinic again points out that the studies done are not conclusive, but is not against people using vitamin D, but issues concerns and considers vitamin D in peoples diet as a possible factor, not just sunshine.

"Research over the years has shown that maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D may have a protective effect and lower the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of studies have shown that people who get more sun exposure and vitamin D in their diet have a lower risk of MS. Therefore, vitamin D supplementation is considered an important modifiable environmental risk factor for development of multiple sclerosis.

Some studies suggest that for people who already have MS, vitamin D may offer some benefits. These benefits include lessening the frequency and severity of their symptoms, improving quality of life, and lengthening the time it takes to progress from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis to the secondary-progressive phase. But the evidence isn't conclusive. "

As the Mayo clinic stated, the cause of MS is still unknown. If it were, a cure would be much closer.
This is pretty interesting. My BIL has Primary Progressive MS, a form that strikes in older age and on which MS drugs are not effective. He was diagnosed at 65 and is now 75.
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Old 06-30-2022, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Chemnitz, Germany
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This is an interesting thread, although I've never lived in Canada. I have spent most of my life on the US west coast, mostly California. Since I retired at the end of 2017, I have split my time between Tucson AZ and eastern Germany (51 degrees north latitude, similar to many cities in Canada).

I have northern European ancestors, meaning fair skin, In California and Arizona, I was always paranoid about covering up, wearing large brim hats, polarized sunglasses and using sunscreen on exposed skin when out for a long time. For a good reason, since I have a grandfather that died from melanoma, and my mother survived melanoma in her 40s. I also visit a dermatologist once a year for a preventative check.

Here in Germany, the sun angle is much lower than CA or AZ most of the year and I am not as sensitive to the sun. I still wear long sleeves most of the time, and wear my brim hats, but the sun is not as intense as in the clear skies of California or Arizona. The humidity level here is also comfortable instead of mostly dry like AZ or southern California - the super dry desert air was really uncomfortable for my skin at times.

Some people in Germany, and I suspect also in Canada, make up for the sun-limited months of November to March by spending a whole lot of time exposed in the sun from May to September. When I say exposed, I mean fully exposed, as most lakes and beaches in the eastern part of Germany have "no clothes" areas and are fairly often crowded. That's why it is hard to generalize and say "all Canadians" (or other northern latitude residents) get less sun damage due to the northern latitudes, compared to people in places further south.
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