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Old 11-17-2013, 06:36 AM
 
1,250 posts, read 3,606,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
No the water guy ( city inspector ) he does not sound American.He sounds like he is from Canada or bay be Greet Lakes.

0:49 to 3:20

I don't hear people in the US with that accent.
City Inspector in the video is definitely American, he pronounces out differently then most
Canadians.
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Old 11-17-2013, 06:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
People from the American shores of the Great Lakes don't sound Canadian to me at all. Maybe to Americans from other parts of the states they do, but not to me as a Canadian.
Agree.

US has the "Great Lakes vowel shift" ....letter o is prounced like an a .

Canadians pronounce caught like cot,
great lakes US is more like cat.
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Old 11-17-2013, 07:31 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,096,099 times
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In mainland Canada, it's either a-beh-ote (difficult to spell it out phonetically) or a-boat (as in the vehicle boat). The former is more common in Montreal. The latter you'll hear more often in Ontario. I can't speak well for the rest of the country. "Abowt" probably comes from Irish. That's why I think we hear it in Newfoundland and the states, because of the Irish influence in those areas versus here.
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Old 11-17-2013, 07:33 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
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What's it called when a is pronounced like "e"? I've heard it before from Americans where dad sounds like "dead" and so on.
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Old 11-17-2013, 07:43 AM
 
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Is it an American vs Canadian English thing when people constantly say "different ... than"?

"Different ..than" is simply wrong. The only correct form is "different from". For example, Canada is different from America.

"Different ... then" is even worth. Almost sounds like illiterate, for not being able distinguish "than" and "then".


"than" is for cases like "A is taller than B".
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Old 11-17-2013, 10:59 AM
 
3,070 posts, read 5,233,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell236 View Post
Did I say "class"? I did not. I said education. Your wealth (your parents' wealth) has little to do with it. Since I'm part of academe I can assure you that Canadians in that milieu do not say "aboot" or "eh".
My undergraduate and graduate studies were in language acquisition and I find your posts condescending and offensive I spent eight years in university (am I "educated" enough?) and part of that education was learning about various English accents, language fluidity, and respect for differences!
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Old 11-17-2013, 10:55 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 2,049,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliss2 View Post
My undergraduate and graduate studies were in language acquisition and I find your posts condescending and offensive I spent eight years in university (am I "educated" enough?) and part of that education was learning about various English accents, language fluidity, and respect for differences!
The reason for any accents is education but it is not that simple.There are many accents in Canada and many accents in the US .But education does not mean the person is smart or educated in other areas.And what type of education.The person may be a doctor ,physicist or engineer or surgeon so on .Yes the person is educate , but does not mean he or she is that educate in English.


So Nell236 may be really good at English , little to no accent, good at spelling ,reading ,writing and grammar!! But how educated in other areas out side of English.

You can't be educated in every thing.

Quote:
City Inspector in the video is definitely American, he pronounces out differently then most
Canadians.
So where is he from than? He does not sound like a American. May be Greet lakes.


Well some of words sound very un- American.

Well there should be a clean-out

Also little lift in is speech when saying clean-out.

That and water service coming up


See that black piling sticking up

If you turn that

None of this sounds American.

Yeah ,they'd have to all be cleaned.

This sounds very Canadian the last one.

The lack of pronunciation of first syllable is give away he not a American.People in Canada place more pronunciation of the last syllable that has lift to it.

clean

American would stress cle in clean and no stress in an an clean

If he is not from Canada , I don't know where he is from.But Americans stress the pronunciation of first syllable.

Even words like Hat ,Bat , Cat there is ah sound Americans make and vowel are stressed.There is lack of ah sound in Canada in Hat ,Bat , Cat and lack of vowel being stressed.

People in Canada seem to stress the last syllable that has lift to it.


Honesty , if not Canadian than where is he from? May be the Great lakes?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ANr17WW_3I

Last edited by sweat209; 11-17-2013 at 11:31 PM..
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Old 11-17-2013, 11:46 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 2,049,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
In mainland Canada, it's either a-beh-ote (difficult to spell it out phonetically) or a-boat (as in the vehicle boat). The former is more common in Montreal. The latter you'll hear more often in Ontario. I can't speak well for the rest of the country. "Abowt" probably comes from Irish. That's why I think we hear it in Newfoundland and the states, because of the Irish influence in those areas versus here.
From what I get from hearing them talk , is people in Canada say about sounds like U being stressed to my ears , and Americans about sounds like abRT .There R being stressed not hard R in like red ,Rat ,rodent ,or rich.
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Old 11-18-2013, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,625 posts, read 3,412,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliss2 View Post
My undergraduate and graduate studies were in language acquisition and I find your posts condescending and offensive I spent eight years in university (am I "educated" enough?)
While I did not spend as much time as you studying linguistics, Aliss; there is no doubt that I spent seven years in university. I gained two degrees. I also spent an articling year where I had to speak frequently before the courts of my province. I still speak in the courts, and on behalf of clients in administrative tribunals; and never had my choice of language called into question by judges at the provincial or Queen's Bench level, nor by administrative chairs.

I will say "eh?" if the situation warrants. Nobody minds.

I agree that Nell's posts are condescending and offensive.
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Old 11-18-2013, 12:58 AM
 
14,611 posts, read 17,568,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Canadians pronounce their "ou" sound differently than Americans. They also tend to use the exclamation "eh" and to use words that Americans don't.
The raising to "about" to sound roughly like "aboot" or "aboat", is also heard in Scotland and the Tyneside area of England. The intonation and pronunciation of some vowel sounds have similarities to the dialects of Northern England such as Geordie.

Regions of the USA like the Appalachians were heavily settled by people of Scottish descent and have pronunciations and vocabulary different than the rest of the USA.

I've asked Canadians why they pronounce the period (the "eh" sound), and I was surprised that many of them barely notice that they say it.

Canadian English is an odd duck, a weird amalgam of American English and British roots. Throw in some minor influences from First Nations languages, French and other immigrant tongues and you've got yourself a quirky variant.
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