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Old 11-10-2014, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,555,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
Yep. I live only 45 minutes South of the border from B.C., and talk to B.C. people almost every day where I work. They really don't sound a whole lot different from Washingtonians until they say certain words, like "sorry", "about", and "house". And then there's the "eh" thing, which is much more pronounced with Western Canadians than it is with people in Ontario and Quebec. And BC'ers call hats "toques" (pronounced "tooks").
Most of Canada call knitted hats toques, not just B.C.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,453 posts, read 4,530,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buffalowings View Post
Oh no ( shakes head) they are the descendants of the finnish, norwegian, german and swedish immigrants not Canadian. An U.P accent sounds nothing like any Canadian I've ever heard. U.P talk sounds very Nordic with some distince Michiganese traits. You cross the border into Canada and the accents changes in a heart beat.
UP talk is just northern 'sconsin with a few subtle shifts. Makes sense.

And if MN/MI/WI accents "don't sound at all Canadian," you'll need to explain to the people living in those areas why everyone in the country asks if they're Canadian. Canadians sound different east-to-west, and generally have many similarities to bordering US areas.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
UP talk is just northern 'sconsin with a few subtle shifts. Makes sense.

And if MN/MI/WI accents "don't sound at all Canadian," you'll need to explain to the people living in those areas why everyone in the country asks if they're Canadian. Canadians sound different east-to-west, and generally have many similarities to bordering US areas.
Exactly. BC Canadians sound different from those from rural Ontario, etc.

I have heard some very 'Canadian' (read, Manitoban / Ontarian) accents among folks from Northern ND (especially Minot).

"Watching (wutching) TV on the couch (Cooch)."
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Old 11-11-2014, 10:31 AM
 
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I am from Canada and live in the US. In Canada we don't really have the diversity of accents that Americans have. The difference between an African American in Mississippi and a white Bostonian is big and that sort of huge difference doesn't exist in Canada (I am not counting Quebec or French speakers in NB and Ontario since obviously they don't speak English). The closest thing to the stereotypical rural Canadian accent is the UP in Michigan and the upper Midwest. I have never been there but all the videos I have seen sound very similar.

But keep in mind that most people in English speaking Canada just speak like people in Seattle or California with the exception of pronouncing a few words differently. You will never hear an American say "process" or "project" or "about" the way we do. So other than these few words we usually sound just like Seattle or California. Most English speaking Canadians are undetectable by Americans until we say these three words. In my experience the majority of times no one has known I am Canadian until I tell them. But only a minority of times they ask if I am Canadian (or Minnesotan LOL) when I say one of these three words.
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Old 11-11-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,555,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILikeMike91 View Post
I am from Canada and live in the US. In Canada we don't really have the diversity of accents that Americans have. The difference between an African American in Mississippi and a white Bostonian is big and that sort of huge difference doesn't exist in Canada (I am not counting Quebec or French speakers in NB and Ontario since obviously they don't speak English). The closest thing to the stereotypical rural Canadian accent is the UP in Michigan and the upper Midwest. I have never been there but all the videos I have seen sound very similar.

But keep in mind that most people in English speaking Canada just speak like people in Seattle or California with the exception of pronouncing a few words differently. You will never hear an American say "process" or "project" or "about" the way we do. So other than these few words we usually sound just like Seattle or California. Most English speaking Canadians are undetectable by Americans until we say these three words. In my experience the majority of times no one has known I am Canadian until I tell them. But only a minority of times they ask if I am Canadian (or Minnesotan LOL) when I say one of these three words.
It's more than just 3 words. Also terms we use such as garburator, hydro, toque etc. give us away.

I do agree though depending on where the person in Canada is from and where the person in the US is from, it can take a moment to pick up the accent.
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Old 11-11-2014, 11:31 AM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,696,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
It's more than just 3 words. Also terms we use such as garburator, hydro, toque etc. give us away.

I do agree though depending on where the person in Canada is from and where the person in the US is from, it can take a moment to pick up the accent.
Exactly. Case in point: been. For Americans, it's typically "bin" and Canadians (at least my BC friends) a British style "bean".
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:15 PM
 
3,749 posts, read 4,966,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Campeador View Post
Exactly. BC Canadians sound different from those from rural Ontario, etc.

I have heard some very 'Canadian' (read, Manitoban / Ontarian) accents among folks from Northern ND (especially Minot).

"Watching (wutching) TV on the couch (Cooch)."
Sort of like this?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fx-EeP05WcE
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
It's more than just 3 words. Also terms we use such as garburator, hydro, toque etc. give us away.

I do agree though depending on where the person in Canada is from and where the person in the US is from, it can take a moment to pick up the accent.
You mean peck op the accent reet eh?
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:26 PM
 
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I always felt that many people throughout the Upper Midwest have some Canadian flavor in their accents.
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:41 PM
 
3,749 posts, read 4,966,930 times
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Default Does Cheryl Cole sound Canadian?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yg9ZuZ6Wazk

Do you think Cheryl Cole sounds a bit like a rural northern Ontarian? She's from Newcastle Upon Tyne and speaks the "Geordie" dialect. I've always thought her accent sounded more like a Canadian or Minnesotan accent than like a stereotypical British accent, aside from her being non-rhotic. When she says "life", "decisions", "casting", "fine" and "no" in the commercial it sounds just like the way Canadians with noticeable accents pronounce it except stronger!

I wonder if the Canadian accent was significantly influenced by British migration from North East England. It wouldn't surprise me considering Ontario used to have a division called the The United Counties of Northumberland and Durham. I've also heard that British Columbia was largely settled by working class people from northern England.
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