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Old 03-16-2021, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
You know your accents? Pin this one down.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gdb21BkmbaU
I won't spoil it but it shouldn't be that hard!
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Old 03-16-2021, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,363 posts, read 8,409,857 times
Reputation: 5260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post

I have actually been to Cheticamp. That side of the Island is really beautiful. On the other side of Cape Breton Island there is a French speaking community on Isle Madame.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4ex4wV8e-o
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Old 03-16-2021, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedeaf View Post
My knowledge of the French schools controversy mostly comes from academic writing on it (of which there's, a little surprisingly, quite a bit - at least one paper solely on it, multiple shorter bits in related papers and literature), and they definitely make it sound pretty contentious, or at least as contentious as education issues can get in a sleepy rural region in NS. From what I can remember, they describe the community as roughly equally divided over the issue, and lots of people are cited as deeply upset and worried that their children's futures are being jeopardized. Admittedly, academic writing can sometimes overdramatize the issues it's focusing on.
.
Yes I also recall it was pretty close to 50-50.

On the one side you had people who wanted the school system to be pretty bilingual, with part of the day in French and part of the day in French.

The other side wanted francophone schools in Nova Scotia to operate just as they do everywhere in Canada, which is to say all subjects are taught in French except for the one class that teaches English as a second language. (This also happens to be how things are stipulated in the Canadian Constitution.)


In such cases, the first group is always predominantly made up of fairly affluent people, who are "self-made", often owning or operating businesses, but generally with lesser levels of education. They tend to be more preoccupied with how well school prepares kids for the business world.

The second group tends to be more formally educated and made up mainly of white-collar professionals. These people are more likely to see school as a community and cultural development tool, and a place that prepares citizens for their future role in society in general as opposed to simply cogs in an economic wheel.
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Old 03-16-2021, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
Reputation: 11651
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I have actually been to Cheticamp. That side of the Island is really beautiful. On the other side of Cape Breton Island there is a French speaking community on Isle Madame.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4ex4wV8e-o
I have relatives who are from some of these regions. When you consider how small they are and how totally surrounded they are by much larger and more populated anglophone areas, it's a pretty freaky accident of history and even a small miracle that people there still speak French after several centuries.
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Old 03-17-2021, 12:34 AM
 
96 posts, read 78,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Radio Radio became household names in Quebec when telecom company Telus chose their song for this hugely popular ad:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKRiV_K98EQ
Yep. They were super popular for a while. Their first three albums really were amazing. After that, not so much. I guess I side with Bilodeau on the whole band direction issue

Looks like Jacuzzi's the 3rd most popular Acadian-written Acadian-performed song on Youtube, behind 2nd place Lisa LeBlanc's Aujourd'hui ma vie c'est d'la marde and no.1 Joseph Edgar's Espionne russe.

(Definitely not counting Roch Voisine. I know he identifies as Acadian among his other identities, but that's not something that's obvious in his music, and most of his audience doesn't think of him as such.

Wasn't sure whether to count Zachary Richard, since I definitely see Acadians and Cajuns as related but different. But it feels kind of different in his case, since he feels so strongly about identifying as Acadian as well, and has been so implicated in the Acadian music scene and written some of the songs Acadians consider their most iconic... So if we were to count him, La balade de Jean Batailleur and Au bord du lac Bijou would push Jacuzzi down to no.5.)

Other Acadian songs with above 1m views: again Lisa with Kraft Dinner and Câlisse-moi là, Cayouche with Le portrait de mon père, Hert Le Blanc with Le bouquet de mon cœur, and Rhéal LeBlanc with Une bonne bouteille de vin. Lots and lots of country in the high hundred thousands.

Évangéline, Acadian-themed but not Acadian-written, comes in at above 6m as performed by Annie Blanchard, and almost 1,3m as performed by Marie-Jo Thério.

It's utterly obscure by comparison, but I prefer Michel Conte's other song about Acadians, Shippagan.

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Old 03-17-2021, 07:39 AM
 
3,462 posts, read 2,789,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I have relatives who are from some of these regions. When you consider how small they are and how totally surrounded they are by much larger and more populated anglophone areas, it's a pretty freaky accident of history and even a small miracle that people there still speak French after several centuries.
One way to keep the language alive is to have more than two children and an economy that keeps them around.
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Old 03-17-2021, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
One way to keep the language alive is to have more than two children and an economy that keeps them around.
They definitely had the first up until 50-60, but never really the second in terms of the past century or more.

Though the Cajuns arguably had both to some degree, and it still didn't keep the language alive.

I'd argue that the Acadians of NS (and indeed many francophone communities outside Quebec) dodged a bullet in the 1980s and turned a corner just in a time. If the situation just prior had persisted, there wouldn't be many francophones left in these areas today. (I still don't think they're out of the woods TBQH, but it's not nearly as bad as it could be.)
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Old 03-17-2021, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
Reputation: 11651
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedeaf View Post

Wasn't sure whether to count Zachary Richard, since I definitely see Acadians and Cajuns as related but different. But it feels kind of different in his case, since he feels so strongly about identifying as Acadian as well, and has been so implicated in the Acadian music scene and written some of the songs Acadians consider their most iconic... So if we were to count him, La balade de Jean Batailleur and Au bord du lac Bijou would push Jacuzzi down to no.5.)
A version of Zachary Richard's Travailler c'est trop dur by Ivoirian singer Alpha Blondy, has over 10 million hits in multiple videos. I think that's probably due to Blondy being relatively well-known in France.

Versions by Richard himself amount to a couple million hits for sure as well.
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Old 03-17-2021, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
Reputation: 11651
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedeaf View Post
Yep. They were super popular for a while. Their first three albums really were amazing. After that, not so much. I guess I side with Bilodeau on the whole band direction issue

Looks like Jacuzzi's the 3rd most popular Acadian-written Acadian-performed song on Youtube, behind 2nd place Lisa LeBlanc's Aujourd'hui ma vie c'est d'la marde and no.1 Joseph Edgar's Espionne russe.

(Definitely not counting Roch Voisine. I know he identifies as Acadian among his other identities, but that's not something that's obvious in his music, and most of his audience doesn't think of him as such.

Wasn't sure whether to count Zachary Richard, since I definitely see Acadians and Cajuns as related but different. But it feels kind of different in his case, since he feels so strongly about identifying as Acadian as well, and has been so implicated in the Acadian music scene and written some of the songs Acadians consider their most iconic... So if we were to count him, La balade de Jean Batailleur and Au bord du lac Bijou would push Jacuzzi down to no.5.)

Other Acadian songs with above 1m views: again Lisa with Kraft Dinner and Câlisse-moi là, Cayouche with Le portrait de mon père, Hert Le Blanc with Le bouquet de mon cœur, and Rhéal LeBlanc with Une bonne bouteille de vin. Lots and lots of country in the high hundred thousands.

Évangéline, Acadian-themed but not Acadian-written, comes in at above 6m as performed by Annie Blanchard, and almost 1,3m as performed by Marie-Jo Thério.

It's utterly obscure by comparison, but I prefer Michel Conte's other song about Acadians, Shippagan.

The traditional Acadian song Partons la mer est belle has hundreds of versions on Youtube and probably millions of views if you added them all up.

Though it's not even Acadian in origin, and predictably is from France, apparently this island specifically off the western coast:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/%C...9!4d-2.3466244
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Old 03-17-2021, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,047,932 times
Reputation: 11651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yes I also recall it was pretty close to 50-50.

On the one side you had people who wanted the school system to be pretty bilingual, with part of the day in French and part of the day in French.
.
I meant part of the day in English here...
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