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Old 03-26-2022, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,552,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Good heavens, I stand corrected and learned something new. Thanks for posting that CS.

.
Canadian raising is quite interesting. It explains why American hear " aboot" when we say " about ". We aren't saying "aboot " at all, but because of Canadian raising, American think we do.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5YJnKy1yq8
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Old 03-26-2022, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,580 posts, read 84,795,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Good heavens, I stand corrected and learned something new. Thanks for posting that CS.

.
My niece used to talk like that with the question mark at the end of every sentence. Drove me insane to hear it. She has a very high-pitched voice to begin with. She is in her 30s now and outgrew it long ago.
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Old 03-26-2022, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Canadian raising is quite interesting. It explains why American hear " aboot" when we say " about ". We aren't saying "aboot " at all, but because of Canadian raising, American think we do.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5YJnKy1yq8
Yes, I'd read about this. I find language/linguistics interesting, which may be why my daughter pursued that field of study. It really isn't a full "aboot" when you listen closely.

Another thing I noticed is that while my bf made fun of me for my NJ "tawk" and "cawfee" (and I in turn made fun of him for reversing it and calling a hawk a "hock"--youse guys just ignore that W?), I notice that in some cases Canadians do the same thing. Calling your capital Autowa, for example, while calling an automobile an "ottomobile".
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Old 03-26-2022, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,552,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Yes, I'd read about this. I find language/linguistics interesting, which may be why my daughter pursued that field of study. It really isn't a full "aboot" when you listen closely.

Another thing I noticed is that while my bf made fun of me for my NJ "tawk" and "cawfee" (and I in turn made fun of him for reversing it and calling a hawk a "hock"--youse guys just ignore that W?), I notice that in some cases Canadians do the same thing. Calling your capital Autowa, for example, while calling an automobile an "ottomobile".
I'm going to listen carefully and see how different friends from all over Canada, say Ottawa!

Years ago I was talking to a tourist from the US...can't remember from where, and they pronounced Ottawa
"oo a tah wa". Sounded very first nations. Told them I think I preferred their pronunciation.

I think I've told this story before on CD, but once I was away for just over 2 months in Europe, in the early 90's.
I hadn't talked or met another Canadian in all that time. I was changing planes in Toronto, when seated across from me at the gate, were two guys. I realized that they were Canadian, and I was hearing our accent for the first time. It sounded much like pigeons cooing After a few moments, it passed, and my ear was back to normal.
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Old 03-26-2022, 02:39 PM
 
14,308 posts, read 11,697,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Canadian raising is quite interesting. It explains why American hear " aboot" when we say " about ". We aren't saying "aboot " at all, but because of Canadian raising, American think we do.
The thing is, that vowel doesn't exist in (most) American English at all. But it is definitely not the same vowel that is typical in "about" in the US.

The Canadian-raising version is actually in between US "about" and "aboot," phonetically speaking. But since Americans don't have that sound, they skip from "about" forward to the next closest sound that IS in their phonetic inventory, "aboot."

At the same time, since Canadians don't say "aboot" and know they don't, they tend to deny that they have a different vowel sound in that word at all.
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Old 03-26-2022, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I'm going to listen carefully and see how different friends from all over Canada, say Ottawa!

Years ago I was talking to a tourist from the US...can't remember from where, and they pronounced Ottawa
"oo a tah wa". Sounded very first nations. Told them I think I preferred their pronunciation.

I think I've told this story before on CD, but once I was away for just over 2 months in Europe, in the early 90's.
I hadn't talked or met another Canadian in all that time. I was changing planes in Toronto, when seated across from me at the gate, were two guys. I realized that they were Canadian, and I was hearing our accent for the first time. It sounded much like pigeons cooing After a few moments, it passed, and my ear was back to normal.
Yes, I shouldn't say "Canadians" as if it's all-encompassing. It might not be. I am staying in Ontario, but I hear the "aw" for a short "o" on TV, too.

The first time I spoke on the phone with my S.O., he said, "you sound like Danny Devito". I certainly don't think my NJ accent is anywhere near as pronounced as his--he is of Italian descent and from a different area of NJ and probably has NYC roots, which I don't--but that's what he heard. And I continued the relationship anyway. The other day I was on the phone with my brother, and when I got off, he said, "Your voice gets Yankier when you talk to other Yanks".

I like the pigeons cooing analogy. I think I know what you mean.

I hear a sort of Canadian accent or way of speaking that is hard to describe. For example, my S.O.'s recently-deceased dog was Ben or Benny. For us, that e is sharp and short. But some Canadians put a sort of extra syllable in there, like be-en. That drives me less crazy than my US southern counterparts who forget that it's an "e" all together and say "bin".

Another, non-verbal thing I've noticed that I get a kick out is that we watch old Cash Cab (trivia game show that takes place in a taxi) reruns in the afternoon. People get in the cab and the crazy lights on the cab ceiling and the sounds go off. In NJ, we would be like, "WHOA, WTF?" if that happened. Even without the cursing, I mean, we'd be at the ready looking around trying to figure out what was going on. The Canadians just sit there and grin and sort of shrink down into their shoulders waiting for someone to tell them what's going on, grinning the whole time. It cracks me up. The bf doesn't get why I think it's funny. LOL.
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Old 03-26-2022, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,552,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
The thing is, that vowel doesn't exist in (most) American English at all. But it is definitely not the same vowel that is typical in "about" in the US.

The Canadian-raising version is actually in between US "about" and "aboot," phonetically speaking. But since Americans don't have that sound, they skip from "about" forward to the next closest sound that IS in their phonetic inventory, "aboot."

At the same time, since Canadians don't say "aboot" and know they don't, they tend to deny that they have a different vowel sound in that word at all.
Simply not true, otherwise how would an english speaking Canadian recognize the elongated vowels that Americans tend to use, in words like about?

A lot of people say that a standard California accent sounds much like a Vancouver one. They are probably the closest, but what gives some American away, and the Canadian away, are certain vowel sounds. When an American says about, out, or house etc, it sounds " drawly " to me.
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Old 03-26-2022, 03:35 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 2,783,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Yes, I'd read about this. I find language/linguistics interesting, which may be why my daughter pursued that field of study. It really isn't a full "aboot" when you listen closely.

Another thing I noticed is that while my bf made fun of me for my NJ "tawk" and "cawfee" (and I in turn made fun of him for reversing it and calling a hawk a "hock"--youse guys just ignore that W?), I notice that in some cases Canadians do the same thing. Calling your capital Autowa, for example, while calling an automobile an "ottomobile".
Do you call young people “yutes ”?
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Old 03-26-2022, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
88,580 posts, read 84,795,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
Do you call young people “yutes ”?
Only in jest, just like I say "youse guys" to fulfill stereotype expectations.

But don't ever say "Joisey" to someone from NJ. Nobody in real life pronounces it that way, and it makes us mean to hear it. We say our Rs, clear and crisp, unless somebody moved there from the city. We might smack you upside the head.

Well, maybe not anymore. I've been in Canada a lot, and it's making me mellow. I haven't leaned on my horn or flipped anyone the bird in almost a year.
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Old 03-26-2022, 05:01 PM
 
14,308 posts, read 11,697,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Simply not true, otherwise how would an english speaking Canadian recognize the elongated vowels that Americans tend to use, in words like about?

A lot of people say that a standard California accent sounds much like a Vancouver one. They are probably the closest, but what gives some American away, and the Canadian away, are certain vowel sounds. When an American says about, out, or house etc, it sounds " drawly " to me.
Of course, Canadians hear different American vowels. Americans hear Canadian raising, too. But without being trained in linguistics, how would either one go about writing or describing sounds that aren't in their personal inventory? It's easier just to say that they are basically the same and that Canadians sound just like Californians.
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