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Old 11-04-2011, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,038,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I've heard it said many ways. Kill-omiter, kill-oh-meet-er, and kill-ah-meet-er.
On the west coast most people pronounce it kill-omiter.

I just say klicks. So much easier.

.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:06 AM
 
73,012 posts, read 62,607,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NatashaH View Post
ITA, that was not a "typical" Canadian accent.

Anyways I want to post videos of Black Canadians from cross the country from various backgrounds. Most of them were either born in Canada or immigrated when they were really young.

1. Measha Brueggergosman, an opera singer (she's brilliant!). From Fredericton, New Brunswick and is a descendant of escaped American slaves. She is also speaking french in this video.


Measha Brueggergosman: A Status Report - YouTube

2. Tracy Moore is a journalist from the Toronto Area (she grew up in Richmond hill).


CityLine - Part 1 - YouTube


3. Cameron Bailey, Co-director of TIFF. Born in Barbados, immigrated to Toronto when he was a child


TIFF08 - Cameron Bailey, TIFF Co-Director - YouTube


4. Kardinal Offishall, rapper. Born in Toronto to Jamaican parents


Kardinal Offishall Interview at Album Playback - YouTube


5. Jarome Iginla, hockey player. Born in Edmonton to a Nigerian father and a white American mother.


jarome iginla interview - YouTube

6. Maxime Fortunus born in the greater Montreal area, to Haitian Parents


Interview with Maxime Fortunus, Texas Stars preseason 10.03.10 - YouTube

7. Israel Idonije, NFL player. Born in Nigeria immigrated to Brandon, Manitoba when he was 4.


Israel Idonije | 29 | Founder, Israel Idonije Foundation - YouTube
It would also be important to mention Drake, born in Toronto to an African-American father and a Jewish mother.


Drake - Unscripted Part 1 - YouTube
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
Reputation: 11650
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatashaH View Post
6. Maxime Fortunus born in the greater Montreal area, to Haitian Parents


Interview with Maxime Fortunus, Texas Stars preseason 10.03.10 - YouTube
Fortunus' accent in English is probably quite similar to mine in English: that of a French-speaking Canadian who is very comfortable and fluent in English but who still has some very subtle French intonations in his speech.
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Old 11-10-2011, 09:42 AM
 
604 posts, read 1,521,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyr View Post
In the US, African-Americans tend to have differant speech patterns and accents from whites, even if they were born in the same city.....Is it the same in Canada? Can you tell if somebody is black just by the sound of their voice on a telephone?

I'm not referring to immigrants directly from Africa or Jamaica, but blacks born and raised in Canada
Sounds the same as white and asian people to me. However it depends on the cultural context. I am sure more American blacks would sound like white people if they lived in certain areas.
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Old 11-13-2011, 02:56 PM
 
73,012 posts, read 62,607,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skihikeclimb View Post
Sounds the same as white and asian people to me. However it depends on the cultural context. I am sure more American blacks would sound like white people if they lived in certain areas.
What differentiates speech patterns of Black Americans from Black Canadians is the Southern factor. Black Americans developed alot of speech patterns from living in the Southeastern USA. When Black people were migrating from the Southeast USA to northern and western cities(New York, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles,etc), the dialect went with them, and in some cases changed within a generation, but still had traces of it. In Canada, it never worked like that. I listened to the video regarding Black people in Nova Scotia. The accents sound somewhat Irish. My guess is that the dialect in Nova Scotia at large had an influence.
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Old 12-21-2011, 11:19 PM
 
1 posts, read 6,733 times
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Other differences include: generalization.
Can.: prOhcess (process)
Amer.: Prawcess
Can.: Day-ta (data)
Amer.-ah-ta
Can.:Hewce (not as in hooce) sort of like hayooce) House and other ouse words Usually
Amer.:Howce, some american broadcasters seem to me to say hass .
Can: Ontario probably...Lara as Lera, Sarah as Serah and so on.
Can.: Nova scotia....seem to me to say k!er instead of cawr, for car.
My math teacher who I believe was born in London Ont. uses "melk" for milk, tess for test, juss for just (no speach impediment)
Lots of others with traces of French influence. the two oficial languages of canada are English and French...
Metre/meter...Americans probably won't be able to easily distinguish these two because they don't use the metric system Canadians do so they can, a metre is a unit of measurement consisting of 100 centimeters roughly 10 percent longer that a yard. Whereas a meter is something that you measure something with, not a unit of measurement itself...like a parking meter.
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Old 12-22-2011, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,939,235 times
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This map does a pretty good job of differentiating different North American accents.

The Lousy Linguist: dialects map
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Old 12-23-2011, 09:30 AM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,877,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfius72 View Post
Other differences include: generalization.
Can.: prOhcess (process)
Amer.: Prawcess
Can.: Day-ta (data)
Amer.-ah-ta
Can.:Hewce (not as in hooce) sort of like hayooce) House and other ouse words Usually
Amer.:Howce, some american broadcasters seem to me to say hass .
Can: Ontario probably...Lara as Lera, Sarah as Serah and so on.
Can.: Nova scotia....seem to me to say k!er instead of cawr, for car.
My math teacher who I believe was born in London Ont. uses "melk" for milk, tess for test, juss for just (no speach impediment)
Lots of others with traces of French influence. the two oficial languages of canada are English and French...
Metre/meter...Americans probably won't be able to easily distinguish these two because they don't use the metric system Canadians do so they can, a metre is a unit of measurement consisting of 100 centimeters roughly 10 percent longer that a yard. Whereas a meter is something that you measure something with, not a unit of measurement itself...like a parking meter.
these are somewhat generalizations, not all Canadians pronounce things the same way, for example, many use the american pronounciations (me for example), others pronounce it the Canadian way it depends. Also I find the Canadians to be inconsistent with their accents, for example in once sentence a Canadian might say house (with Canadian raising) then the next sentence pronounce it the American way. Or they might pronounce borrowed words such as taco as TAK-O (rhythmes with apple) then the next minute they pronounce it the american style tah-ko. Americans seem to be more consistent.
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Old 12-23-2011, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
Reputation: 11650
More generalizations:

Pasta
Canadian: pah-sta
American: paw-sta

Mazda
Canadian: mahz-da
American: mawz-da

Visa
Canadian: veez-a
American: veess-a
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Old 12-23-2011, 10:07 AM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,877,409 times
Reputation: 3724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
More generalizations:

Pasta
Canadian: pah-sta
American: paw-sta

Mazda
Canadian: mahz-da
American: mawz-da

Visa
Canadian: veez-a
American: veess-a
you are right, but your phonetics arent right. the pah indicates an unrounded pronounciation, the paw indicates a rounded pronounciation, in essence the americans would pronounce it pah-sta (same vowel sound as father) the canadians would pronounce it pass-ta (same vowel sound as apple)
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