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Old 01-08-2012, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,016,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
pl explain how multiculturalism is promoted in the small isolated cities/ towns of the province, and would you truly suggest that in such places, the display of multiculturalism/ embracing of ethnic culutres, is distinct from the "melting pot" concept..?
You can check all that out for yourself at your leisure and choose from the sites listed to read about it.

Promoting Multiculturalism in British Columbia - click here ---> Google

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Old 01-08-2012, 04:37 PM
 
99 posts, read 254,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Agree with all of this except about profanity. I find Canadians swear a lot, and probably more than Americans since religion is less in the public sphere in Canada, so there is less of this "right vs. wrong" moral thing going on. Of course, in certain spheres in the U.S. there is a lot of swearing, but in mixed company and wider society you can get dirty looks and even taken to task for swearing because it is considered socially unacceptable. Not so much in Canada.

Regarding the accent itself, Canadian English is considered by a lot of people to be very clear and neutral, which is why American TV networks often like to hire Canadians onto their news teams.
To me Canadian sounds a little bit like how Americans talked in the '30s and '40s, if you ever watch those old MGM films.

And I agree, that Canadians do seem to swear at least as much as Americans, despite it being a more polite society in general. I think the words simply carry less meaning there; Canadians don't seem to swear in anger/call people names as much as Americans do, more just curse as slang. There's even an electro group called Holy **** in Toronto. I sure heard a lot of swearing when I was in Vancouver lol. But not really any more than here in the States, I think since the '90s profanity's pretty much become totally mainstream. There's not much of a difference.

I have heard Southerners generally swear less than other Americans though, not sure if it's true as I've never been down the way of Dixie.
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Old 01-08-2012, 04:38 PM
 
99 posts, read 254,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darrensmooth View Post
I agree with you both, there are differences between the Gen-Can accent and the Gen-Am but the differences don't outweigh the similarities. I will say this though, there is no twang in the Canadian accent, that seems to be present in US accents, hard to explain what I mean by that, but hopefully you understand
Yeah, I noticed when I came back from Vancouver, to the States, that even northwesterners have a twang relative to Canadians.
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Old 01-08-2012, 04:41 PM
 
99 posts, read 254,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post

Yes the Canadian accent is more similar to the Western US accent than say the Southern or Upstate NY accents, but still noticeably different nonetheless...immediately when you cross the border even into WA state, the accent is noticeably different despite what some posters have suggest

Heck, I bet the people on the north side of Avenue Zero in White Rock talk more like people in Toronto than they do like people 20 feet away in Blaine!
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Old 01-08-2012, 04:43 PM
 
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I don't know, it sounded rather strong to me. However, it is very influenced, especially in younger women, I noticed, by the 'Val' accent of California, but that's probably true all over the Anglosphere nowadays.
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Old 01-09-2012, 11:13 AM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,875,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robynator View Post
Definitely... in the USA, o's are sometimes pronounced as a's. In Canada, o's are o's, a's are a's, and rarely do the two mix.

ex:

arrrange
Flarrrrida

And sometimes what is typically a one syllable word in Canada can be pronounced with two syllables in the USA.

ex: the word "and" can sometimes come out as "AIYand" by Americans (though moreso in the SAYouth")

and because Canadian's don't pronounce their o's as a's, to an American ear, it sounds like Canadians are pronouncing words like "about" with extra o's, like "aboot". Of course, to Canadian ears, Americans aren't saying "about", they say "aBAYout"... they say it with extra a's.

And that whole "aboot" pronunciation is a myth anyway which has become out of proportion due to South Park. There is no "ooooo" (like "boot") in the Canadian "about". It's more like "a-boat" or "a-BO-it", but not "aboot".
I know this is an old post, but this is inaccurate. The Canadian pronounciation of 'about' sounds unique due to 'Canadian Raising' it has nothing to do with pronouncing your a's or o's. the English pronounce their o's and a's yet they dont have the same unique pronounciation. Also, Canadians DO in fact use a's to pronounce words with o's in them (sometimes), such as 'Don' which would be pronounced the same as 'Dawn' or Lot which would be pronounced as 'Lawt'..this applies to Ontario, i'm not sure about the ROC
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Old 01-10-2012, 12:08 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,865 posts, read 10,520,966 times
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I find that people from Vancouver sound more like people from Ontario than people from English communities in Quebec do. We've got less of the Canadian raising and some of the dying regional accents outside Montreal sound fairly different from either the ones West of the Ottawa river or East of Gaspe. I find Jon Lajoie, below, has an accent that's really typical of Montreal. I find Toronto and Vancouver accents are closer to each other than to this one.


jon lajoie interview normal canadian - YouTube
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:24 AM
 
1,604 posts, read 1,565,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robynator View Post
Definitely... in the USA, o's are sometimes pronounced as a's. In Canada, o's are o's, a's are a's, and rarely do the two mix.

ex:

arrrange
Flarrrrida

And sometimes what is typically a one syllable word in Canada can be pronounced with two syllables in the USA.

ex: the word "and" can sometimes come out as "AIYand" by Americans (though moreso in the SAYouth")

and because Canadian's don't pronounce their o's as a's, to an American ear, it sounds like Canadians are pronouncing words like "about" with extra o's, like "aboot". Of course, to Canadian ears, Americans aren't saying "about", they say "aBAYout"... they say it with extra a's.

And that whole "aboot" pronunciation is a myth anyway which has become out of proportion due to South Park. There is no "ooooo" (like "boot") in the Canadian "about". It's more like "a-boat" or "a-BO-it", but not "aboot".
You must be a linguist. I've never seen a better comparison of the two accents. Excellent work there.
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Old 01-13-2012, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Canada
63 posts, read 120,871 times
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Good question! The most distinctive feature of Canadian English, and the one which Americans use in spotting Canadian speakers, is the phenomenon known to linguists as Canadian Raising. This refers to the fact that, before voiceless consonants, the diphthongs /ai/ and /au/ have allophones with raised central first elements.
The diphthongs /ei/ and /ou/ of "bay" and "boat" are very narrow. The narrow pronunciation of /ei/ is a well-established feature of CanEng and not an innovation, as it is in some forms of USeng.
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Old 01-13-2012, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,016,027 times
Reputation: 34866
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsius View Post
Heck, I bet the people on the north side of Avenue Zero in White Rock talk more like people in Toronto than they do like people 20 feet away in Blaine!
Put it this way. If you had a group of people from White Rock (or Vancouver) socializing with a group of people from Blaine (or Bellingham or even Seattle) you would never know who was from where as long as none of them were talking about politics, religion, guns or the price of things. It's the topics that people talk about and their attitudes about things that shows any differences, not the way they talk or the kinds of mannerisms they have.

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