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Old 01-13-2012, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,574 posts, read 5,115,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
If you had a group of people from White Rock (or Vancouver) socializing with a group of people from Blaine (or Bellingham or even Seattle) you would never know who was from where as long as none of them were talking about politics, religion, guns or the price of things. It's the topics that people talk about and their attitudes about things that shows any differences, not the way they talk or the kinds of mannerisms they have.

.
So you are saying the people in BC/ Canada sound the same as in WA state?
Do you know what "Canadian raising" means, and that it is non-existent to the US West Coast, from Bellingham to San Diego?
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Old 01-13-2012, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kelsius View Post
Heck, I bet the people on the north side of Avenue Zero in White Rock talk more like people in Toronto than they do like people 20 feet away in Blaine!
no " " needed..it is actually the truth (and one very interesting & intriguing thing about Canada with a relatively homogenous accent covering a huge huge distance, i dont think anywhere in the world is like it that way)
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Old 01-13-2012, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,016,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
So you are saying the people in BC/ Canada sound the same as in WA state?
No, I'm not saying that for all of BC and all of Washington. I referred only to the specific region in proximity to the border and the coast between Vancouver and Seattle. I wouldn't include new immigrants or any of the PNW First Nations people in that either because they all have distinctive accents of their own.

Explicitly - I'd say people who were born and raised or are otherwise long term residents in the far north west corner of Washington and the far south west corner of BC (including the coastal islands) - let's say the region within 150 klick radius from Blaine/White Rock - all sound the same. The further south, north and east you get outside of that particular region, the more increasing regional differences there are in people's accents.

.
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Old 01-14-2012, 10:34 AM
 
3,059 posts, read 8,281,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
no " " needed..it is actually the truth (and one very interesting & intriguing thing about Canada with a relatively homogenous accent covering a huge huge distance, i dont think anywhere in the world is like it that way)
Neither is Canada - the Alberta accent is vastly different from a Miramichi accent which is very different from a Newfoundland accent. Homogenous? Nah.
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Old 01-14-2012, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Toronto
3,295 posts, read 7,014,045 times
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I've never been good at telling accents apart.

When people say they hear perceptible differences in the way certain vowels are pronounced etc. between a Canadian accent and many American ones, I'm often clueless at distinguishing them or have to try and listen hard to figure it out.

It takes very strong and obvious accents for me to notice often or realize where someone is from.

Since I've never been very good at phonetic discrimination, I usually rely on vocabulary, pragmatics, social manners etc. to tell people from regions apart, North American or otherwise.

Often the first thing I notice about regionalisms is the different names people have for the same objects/things or the different wording when they talk.
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Old 01-15-2012, 02:51 AM
 
3,059 posts, read 8,281,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
I've never been good at telling accents apart.

When people say they hear perceptible differences in the way certain vowels are pronounced etc. between a Canadian accent and many American ones, I'm often clueless at distinguishing them or have to try and listen hard to figure it out.

It takes very strong and obvious accents for me to notice often or realize where someone is from.

Since I've never been very good at phonetic discrimination, I usually rely on vocabulary, pragmatics, social manners etc. to tell people from regions apart, North American or otherwise.

Often the first thing I notice about regionalisms is the different names people have for the same objects/things or the different wording when they talk.
I have difficulty distinguishing between the west coast accents (Canadian and USA) - as you say, word usage helps - the one I find most amusing is a common response to "Thank-you" - instead of "You're welcome" a lot of Americans say "Uh huh".
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Old 01-15-2012, 03:26 AM
 
3,083 posts, read 4,875,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
So you are saying the people in BC/ Canada sound the same as in WA state?
Do you know what "Canadian raising" means, and that it is non-existent to the US West Coast, from Bellingham to San Diego?
from wiki regarding Canadian Raising:

"Despite its name, the phenomenon is not restricted to Canada. It is quite common in New England (including in the traditional accent of Martha's Vineyard), and also occurs in parts of the upper Midwest. Southern Atlantic varieties of English and the accents of the Fens in England feature it as well. While "true Canadian raising" affects both the /aʊ/ and /aɪ/ diphthongs, a related phenomenon with a much wider distribution throughout the United States that affects only the /aɪ/ diphthong also exists. So, whereas the pronunciations of "rider" and "writer" are identical [ˈɹaɪɾɚ] for some Americans, those whose dialects include raising will pronounce The American raising of /aɪ/ can be found in the northern United States, the Mid-Atlantic Dialect region, California, and probably in many other parts of the country, as it appears to be spreading. There are also Canadians who raise /aɪ/ and not /aʊ/ or vice versa. This phenomenon preserves the recoverability of the phoneme /t/ in "writer" despite the North American English process of flapping, which merges /t/ and /d/ into [ɾ] before unstressed vowels." them [ˈɹaɪɾɚ] and [ˈɹʌɪɾɚ], respectively (whereas in Received Pronunciation, these words would be pronounced [ˈɹaɪdə] and [ˈɹaɪtə], respectively).

To conclude in California sometimes the /aI/ vowel is raised which is half of the equation, but /au/ is not
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,034,272 times
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Default Is the Canadian accent getting weaker?

I watched the original Degrassi, and noticed the parents and adults in general often had a distinctly Canadian accent. I'd describe it as sort of Minnesota meets Native American meets British accent. Some of their intonations, for instant, were quite foreign to the US and sounded a lot like British accents (which I've very familiar with).

The children, however, sounded American except for a few words like 'about' and 'sorry', and I'm not even sure I'd say their accent was different enough to be called different from General American. Their intonation (the tone) seemed different though.

Would you say, in urban areas like Toronto and Vancouver that the accent is often indistinguishable from newscaster's American (think a place like Des Moines, Iowa or Seattle) aside from a few words? Of the many young Canadian celebrities, like Michael Buble, Michael Cera, Josh Rogan, Ellen Paige, Tegan and Sara, Feist, Avril Lavigne, Justin Bieber.etc few seem to have decidedly Canadian accents. Is it stronger in rural areas? The strongest Canadian accent among young people I heard was a girl from Nova Scotia and even hers wasn't that strong. Middle aged people tended to sound different, a bit more 'dorky' sounding (no offence) lol.

Maybe I notice it less as an Australian, but I've also met many Canadians here and they just sounded American to me. I can also tell a strong Canadian accent quite easily so it's not like I don't know what that sounds like. I've met a few people from Toronto, one girl sounded a bit Minnesota/Fargo, while the others could've come from LA!

Has this been your observation too? Do you fear Canadianisms like 'eh' and 'aboot' are on the way out?

Also the way they say 'CAnada' is more 'open' compared to Americans. The same vowel in words like 'bad.'
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Hillsboro, OR
2,200 posts, read 4,420,988 times
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It really just depends on where in Canada the person is from... but yeah, with age overall all of the accents are getting slightly weaker.

The Prairies and Northern Ontario will generally have a stronger "Canadian" accent, whereas Newfoundland has its own special thing going. I've noticed with NL that I can understand younger people much better than older people.
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Old 06-06-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,034,272 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by psulions2007 View Post
It really just depends on where in Canada the person is from... but yeah, with age overall all of the accents are getting slightly weaker.

The Prairies and Northern Ontario will generally have a stronger "Canadian" accent, whereas Newfoundland has its own special thing going. I've noticed with NL that I can understand younger people much better than older people.
Would you say Vancouver and Toronto sound equally 'American'?

Yes it seems the Prairies, rural Alberta, Northern ON and the far north are strongest.

What about the smaller cities like Calgary, Regina, Saskatoon, Ottawa? Are they a bit more Canadian sounding?
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