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Old 06-06-2012, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,019,680 times
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I find that the Canadian accent from Ontario all the way to the west coast is not particularly strong, and fairly close to "general American".

Are the Canadian particularities fading away? Not sure.

The strongest accents in English in Canada are in the Atlantic region.

Here is a Newfoundland accent. This guy is a Rhodes Scholar BTW:

CBC's Rex Murphy Rips Environmentalists - YouTube

This accent seems to be very slowly disappearing, especially in the capital city of St. John's where a lot of young people only have a faint trace of it these days.

Aside from Newfoundland, the strongest accents in Atlantic Canada are probably to be found on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia.
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Old 06-06-2012, 03:35 PM
 
395 posts, read 859,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I find that the Canadian accent from Ontario all the way to the west coast is not particularly strong, and fairly close to "general American".

Are the Canadian particularities fading away? Not sure.

The strongest accents in English in Canada are in the Atlantic region.

Here is a Newfoundland accent. This guy is a Rhodes Scholar BTW:

CBC's Rex Murphy Rips Environmentalists - YouTube

This accent seems to be very slowly disappearing, especially in the capital city of St. John's where a lot of young people only have a faint trace of it these days.

Aside from Newfoundland, the strongest accents in Atlantic Canada are probably to be found on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia.
The accent thing is the whole provience, there's this myth that it's only people from st johns, it's simply not the least bit true, the city itself has one of the stronger accents(because the population is so much greater than the rest of the island.)
It's more of a drawl, less of a dialect, but a very strong tendency for a certain intonation. The rest of the island has dialects (wierd grammar and stuff), but its eroded much faster due to the smaller populations.


Anyhow no matter where you go in the world regional accents are eroding, it's a product of broadcast media, nothing more.

Also the english language as a whole is converging, I'm pretty sure the asian/european dialects will have a greater effect on american english than anyone now expects.
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Old 06-06-2012, 06:29 PM
 
701 posts, read 1,032,405 times
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Heard my first "a-boot" today. (Many Americans think Canadians say "a-boot" but they don't, they actually say "a-beh-oot" (whilst Americans say "a-bah-oot".) But this was a genuine "boot" lol.

This guy had as strong a Canadian accent as I've ever heard, and it wasn't like Rex's, but closer to Bob and Doug McKenzie. But slower.

But he had a weird mannerism: he used long pauses at the end of sentences and I thought it was my time to talk, but then he'd continue talking (and I'd embarassingly talk over him by mistake). Is this some Canadian thing among some folks with heavy accents or was it simply a personal quirk on his part?

About the nicest guy I've met in my life too.

(Though he's from Toronto, so it must be fake niceness, because according to many on this forum Torontonians are all cold and unfriendly lol.)
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Old 06-06-2012, 06:51 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,327 posts, read 3,179,860 times
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It has a lot in common with the dialects of the western US but is pretty different from the way Americans east of Colorado talk. I think the TV/Western accent is also merging towards Canadian as well, people my age in Ontario and BC sound fairly similar to me and people I know.

Interestingly though, Ontarians are probably sounding less and less like the Americans over the water from them, due to the Northern Cities vowel shift and also the shift of General Canadian away from 'aboat'.
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:35 AM
 
87 posts, read 192,589 times
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Canada actually has many different accents. For example, where I am from in Thunder Bay, ON we have a very thick Canadian Hick accent mixing with native american kinda. Words like "about" sound like aboat etc.

When I go to Toronto they sound American to me. People from down there think they sound Canadian but they don't sound to what I think a Canadian sounds like.

People out west have a similar accent to mine but there is a difference.

Obviously Quebec residents have an accent.

The people on the east coast also sound kind of American to me. For example they would say "Hamlin" with a heavy emphasis on the "A" like Haaaaamlin. While I would say it more like "Homlin" (kinda)
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Old 06-07-2012, 07:16 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,047,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamlin6969 View Post
Canada actually has many different accents. For example, where I am from in Thunder Bay, ON we have a very thick Canadian Hick accent mixing with native american kinda. Words like "about" sound like aboat etc.

When I go to Toronto they sound American to me. People from down there think they sound Canadian but they don't sound to what I think a Canadian sounds like.

People out west have a similar accent to mine but there is a difference.

Obviously Quebec residents have an accent.

The people on the east coast also sound kind of American to me. For example they would say "Hamlin" with a heavy emphasis on the "A" like Haaaaamlin. While I would say it more like "Homlin" (kinda)
Yes, most Torontoans didn't seem to have an accent that was that different to the standard American I hear on TV.
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Old 06-13-2012, 05:14 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,327 posts, read 3,179,860 times
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I notice a divide between Canadians born before and after 1970 don't you? Canadians older than 40 or so sound more stereotypically Canadian, while Canadians younger than 40 have an accent that's a bit more similar to the accent of American television though it lacks the drawl of American speech and still retains the feature of pitch rising as the sentence continues, like you are asking a question.
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Old 06-13-2012, 05:16 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,327 posts, read 3,179,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThroatGuzzler View Post
Thus sounding Canadian.. meaning it's more like Washingtonians and Orgegonians sound Canadian rather than Vancouverites sounding "American".
I would say the PNW is the peg in between the dialect of California and the dialect of Canada.
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Old 06-13-2012, 06:57 AM
 
25,021 posts, read 27,927,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes, most Torontoans didn't seem to have an accent that was that different to the standard American I hear on TV.
My ex was born and raised in the GTA and she had an accent. It was a light one, but an accent nonetheless. You have to live or be around Americans or Canadians for a couple months to notice the difference. My fiancee also thought Canadians and Americans have no difference in accent, but it's not true. They do, even most of the ones that don't claim they do. It's similar to how Americans have a hard time distinguishing between an Ozzie and a Kiwi and a posh Australian with a Home Counties Englishman.
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Hamilton
61 posts, read 194,789 times
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I was playing Call of Duty online a few years ago and said something like, "They're in the house". Then this American girl that I was talking a little bit to asked me to repeat so I did and she said, "You talk funny, say house again". Funny thing is that right before, she was talking to me and saying that she was from Nebraska (or Kansas) and thought that she had a dumb hick accent and I said that she sounded fine.

A month later a kid from a youth group that I volunteered with was telling a story to the group about where he lived overseas and I noticed that every time he said house there was a very distinct accent haha.
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