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Old 06-13-2012, 01:28 PM
 
87 posts, read 192,637 times
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Being from Northwestern Ontario, we go to Minnesota a lot. We sound like them in certain ways. By "we" I mean the people in my city (thunder bay). I can tell within a few words that they are from minnesota due to their "O" and "A" sound. People in winnipeg sound very similar to me but someone from Alberta or the Prairies sounds different than me in some ways. People in Toronto obviously sound way different than what I am used to hearing. They sound american to me and I can tell they are from Toronto.
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Old 06-20-2012, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Northern Ontario, Canada
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Want to hear the quintessential Canadian accent?
McDonald's photo shoot - Behind the scenes - YouTube
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Old 06-20-2012, 08:30 PM
 
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IMO yes the accent is becoming more neutral, for proof talk to an eldery person from ontario and that person's grand child, the elderly person will almost sound British in comparison to their younger grand child. Another thing is, I wouldnt say an accent is stronger or weaker, but more neutral (could be from anywhere in a country but cannot place where) or less neutral/regional (probably from a region you are familiar with)
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Old 06-20-2012, 11:55 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,327 posts, read 3,180,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darrensmooth View Post
IMO yes the accent is becoming more neutral, for proof talk to an eldery person from ontario and that person's grand child, the elderly person will almost sound British in comparison to their younger grand child. Another thing is, I wouldnt say an accent is stronger or weaker, but more neutral (could be from anywhere in a country but cannot place where) or less neutral/regional (probably from a region you are familiar with)
Yeah I noticed that young people in Ontario sound the same as young people in Vancouver, basically similar to a Californian or PNW accent but with some Canadianisms, but I can tell that older Ontarians have more of a British and also eastern United States sound to their voice (maybe the Italian influence?), while older BC residents don't sound too much different from the young people there.
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Old 06-24-2012, 01:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
Yeah I noticed that young people in Ontario sound the same as young people in Vancouver, basically similar to a Californian or PNW accent but with some Canadianisms, but I can tell that older Ontarians have more of a British and also eastern United States sound to their voice (maybe the Italian influence?), while older BC residents don't sound too much different from the young people there.
by Canadianisms I assume you mean the Canadian Raising and the Rounded vowel's or do you mean choice of words like 'wash room' for example??
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Old 06-24-2012, 01:48 AM
 
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I feel it's a more urban rural phenomena. The only canadians in southern ontario i seem to encounter with thicker accents tend to come from "up north" and the smaller towns therein.

The same can be said for most urban-rural situations in many other countries.

Also using the OP's example of younger canadian celebrities I don't think older canadian celebrities like jim carrey, dan akroyd, martin short, mike myers, bryan adams had particularly noticeable canadian accents, at least i've never hear people make mention of them.
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Old 06-24-2012, 04:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajl22586 View Post
Want to hear the quintessential Canadian accent?
McDonald's photo shoot - Behind the scenes - YouTube
Ha! Great video! Correct on the accent and actually interesting to watch! Canadian "about" at around 48 seconds.
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Old 06-27-2012, 12:11 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
It has a lot in common with the dialects of the western US but is pretty different from the way Americans east of Colorado talk. I think the TV/Western accent is also merging towards Canadian as well, people my age in Ontario and BC sound fairly similar to me and people I know.

Interestingly though, Ontarians are probably sounding less and less like the Americans over the water from them, due to the Northern Cities vowel shift and also the shift of General Canadian away from 'aboat'.
Yep. You and I were talking about this in the California forum. Outside of MN and the Dakotas, Californians sound the most Canadian. This is significant because most of the movies and TV come out of CA. This is often the dialect many people pick up. Californians have a slight Canadian like rise in words like about. Sounding slightly like aboat but not as strongly. Also, Californians tend to clip vowels more. This is most prominent in Northern California.

These may be the reasons perhaps why younger Canadians may have weaker accents and why younger Californians accents are also changing. I run into Canadians sometimes at work and if it weren't for checking ID'd, I'd often never know they were Canadian.
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Old 06-27-2012, 12:22 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
I notice a divide between Canadians born before and after 1970 don't you? Canadians older than 40 or so sound more stereotypically Canadian, while Canadians younger than 40 have an accent that's a bit more similar to the accent of American television though it lacks the drawl of American speech and still retains the feature of pitch rising as the sentence continues, like you are asking a question.
We do that too LOL
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Old 06-27-2012, 12:25 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,588 posts, read 27,390,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darrensmooth View Post
by Canadianisms I assume you mean the Canadian Raising and the Rounded vowel's or do you mean choice of words like 'wash room' for example??
Mostly the rising and rounded vowels. I've heard people say wash-room but didn't know that was a Canadian thing.
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