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Old 01-08-2013, 11:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darrensmooth View Post
Not sure what they are trying to say about this Canadian raising
Quote:



Thus, by using Canadian Raising, the words in the following word pairs can be pronounced differently: ride and write, five and fife, and rise and rice.

this is also due to Canadian Raising of the AI dipthong so ride is not pronounced raised but write is (write almost sounds like 'rate' in some speakers)

Do you have some youtube clips where I can hear the difference.

Also I posted some youtube clips here of how Canadian talk and Americans talk may be you can point out words they saying in the video using Canadian Raising and than the videos Americans talking not using Canadian Raising so I can hear the difference of how they say the words .
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Old 01-08-2013, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Mille Fin
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I'm a fully bilingual native Montrealer, and I've always been told by Americans that my accent was nondescript, American-sounding & CNN-ish. I would think taking our cue from American media to a greater degree than say, Toronto (where English has always been the exclusive language of use) has something to do with it.

I myself have less trouble pointing out an anglo-Canadian at my school than an American or anglo-Montrealer. I've also become quite good at spotting Toronto transplants. I feel like Torontonians have this recognizable valley-girl tinge in their accents. Hard to explain that one, though.

Also, anglo-Montrealers of Italian origin have an accent quite similar to the New-York-Jersey mob accent you'd find in Sopranos.
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Do you have some youtube clips where I can hear the difference.

Also I posted some youtube clips here of how Canadian talk and Americans talk may be you can point out words they saying in the video using Canadian Raising and than the videos Americans talking not using Canadian Raising so I can hear the difference of how they say the words .
Here you go: Sound Comparisons

Check out the words on the right.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:25 PM
 
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Not sure how true that web site is because if you listen to it the Standard American has more of drawl than Alabama by far.

The Standard Canadian is very short and drops hard .

The Standard Canadian saying five and ice sounds the same has Standard American the only thing may be the Standard Americans have bit more drawl.

You can hear it and that me know.

Also the Standard Canadian out sounds like out but Standard Americans sound like aaaarrrt or oooouuuut more drawl where Standard Canadian is short and drops hard.

The Standard American has more of drawl saying white and out than Alabama saying white and out.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
The Standard Canadian saying five and ice sounds the same has Standard American the only thing may be the Standard Americans have bit more drawl.
They're most definitely not the same diphthong. If you analyze the audio samples with Praat, or even just a simple audio editor, you'll hear it.
That being said, some Canadians have a more extreme pronunciation of the "ai" diphthong, similar to the "Scotland & Ireland" pronunciation. Examples: this, or the the more extreme "ace"

Also, many, if not most, Americans have "Canadian" raised "ai." General American isn't all that common anymore.

Same goes for out etc. Some Canadians do have a more extreme pronunciation of that as well, for instance "out" can sound like this or this.

It's normal for vowels and diphthongs to be shorter before voiceless consonants, but in the case of Canadians, they're not just shorter, they're entirely different vowels.

I don't hear any drawl.

More examples to illustrate the contrast between the raised and normal diphthong:

http://www.yorku.ca/twainweb/troberts/raising.html
http://www.ic.arizona.edu/~lsp/Canadian/canphon3.html

It's pretty stark in the audio files.
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Old 01-09-2013, 02:30 PM
 
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basically Americans will elongate certain vowels or draw it out where as Canadians will clip their pronounciation of the same vowels. I agree with KingSamme that many Americans have raised AI, you hear it in words like 'Like' when used in between words..."so we went to the bar and lake (like) this guy talked to us" not exactly like the word lake, but close. But Americans dont raise it as severely as Canadians. Also Americans will raise and dipthongize 'a' if before a nasal consonant (this is one of the most imitiated features of american accents) so 'man' sounds like 'meh-uhn' Canadians from Ontario (maybe other parts too) do this as well, but not as severely.

this briefly breaks down North American accents: http://dialectblog.com/northamerican-accents/
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Old 01-09-2013, 03:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KingSamme View Post
They're most definitely not the same diphthong. If you analyze the audio samples with Praat, or even just a simple audio editor, you'll hear it.
That being said, some Canadians have a more extreme pronunciation of the "ai" diphthong, similar to the "Scotland & Ireland" pronunciation. Examples: this, or the the more extreme "ace"
Yes I can year those two links sound more like they are from Canada than the US they have much more of Canadian accent.

Not all but some Canadians do talk like that.


May be you and others can listen to these youtube links below and point out the words of Canadian Raising and Canadian accent and I can compare it to my other youtube videos of Americans talking.




The Accent TAG! (Toronto-Canada) - YouTube


Canadian Accent Tag! - YouTube


Accent Tag - Canadian!! - YouTube


(Canadian) Accent Tag - YouTube


Canadian Accent Tag - YouTube




Note I`m not really good at picking out accents both in US and Canada so if you can point out the words that sound Canadian than I can compare it to youtube clips of Americans talking.

Also point out any words of Canadian Raising they say.
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Old 01-10-2013, 01:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Yes I can year those two links sound more like they are from Canada than the US they have much more of Canadian accent.

Not all but some Canadians do talk like that.


May be you and others can listen to these youtube links below and point out the words of Canadian Raising and Canadian accent and I can compare it to my other youtube videos of Americans talking.




The Accent TAG! (Toronto-Canada) - YouTube


Canadian Accent Tag! - YouTube


Accent Tag - Canadian!! - YouTube


(Canadian) Accent Tag - YouTube


Canadian Accent Tag - YouTube




Note I`m not really good at picking out accents both in US and Canada so if you can point out the words that sound Canadian than I can compare it to youtube clips of Americans talking.

Also point out any words of Canadian Raising they say.
I only watched the first two, the first girl sounds nasally/valley girl...she does use a rounded vowel when says caught (caw-t, americans would most likely say cah-t) otherwise she sounds pretty standard with hardly any regionalisms so therefore hard to point out where she is from if you dont know. The second one, also very neutral sounding except she says 'pert of the fun' instead of 'part of the fun' thats a bit of a giveway as well, other than that very neutral sounding
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Old 01-10-2013, 01:20 PM
 
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one other thing is the word sure, almost all Canadians pronounce this word as 'shure'. In the US it depends where you are you might pronounce it as shure or shore..but almost no Canadians pronounce the word 'sure' as shore, so if you hear it and the accent is North American, then they are most likely American, same applies for the words pure (pu-ore) insecure (insecyore) mature (matyore) etc
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Old 01-10-2013, 09:11 PM
 
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For me, it's not even in specific words Canadians say, it's evident in the upward lilt at the end of a sentence or comment. Their speaking pace/delivery has a lot of crescendos.

Ours may have some seriously varied accents, but the modulation is flatter and more uniform, unless you find a surfer excited by a big wave or a New York construction worker catcalling an attractive lady walking by.
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