Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-17-2013, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,080 posts, read 14,320,050 times
Reputation: 9789

Advertisements

Quote:
In Quebec at least, not sure in rest of Canada), we pronounce "Kiloohmeter
We do? I've never heard it pronounced Kiloohmeter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-17-2013, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,080 posts, read 14,320,050 times
Reputation: 9789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Vive la diffrence!
It's différence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
10,060 posts, read 12,803,961 times
Reputation: 7168
Quote:
Originally Posted by weltschmerz View Post
It's différence.
Well, Acajack spelled the word "diffrently".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,543,399 times
Reputation: 11937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
When it comes to spelling, I don't think I can come up with even five words offhand that are spelled diffrently. It's basically identical.
I remember seeing the word " pull " on doors in France spelled " tirez", whereas in Canada I saw it spelled
"tirer" .

I may have it backwards. Is this true, or are both used in Canada.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,010,075 times
Reputation: 11640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I remember seeing the word " pull " on doors in France spelled " tirez", whereas in Canada I saw it spelled
"tirer" .

I may have it backwards. Is this true, or are both used in Canada.
Been to France several times but can't say I noticed if they have a preference for TIREZ or TIRER.

In Quebec you really see both all over the place. And both are grammatically correct.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 01:33 PM
 
304 posts, read 1,425,429 times
Reputation: 180
I've noticed that the 'u' in words such as colour, humour etc. is beginning to disappear in many online blogs and occasionally a few major newspapers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,543,399 times
Reputation: 11937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Been to France several times but can't say I noticed if they have a preference for TIREZ or TIRER.

In Quebec you really see both all over the place. And both are grammatically correct.
I noticed the different spelling when I was back on a Canadian plane heading home. So both spellings are used. Is there a reason or preference in using tirer over tirez and vice versa?


For fun I did a photo search using " France tirer " and " France tirez". Totally unscientific of course, but it only brought up possible images using tirez.
Attached Thumbnails
***The Accent Thread*** -  ALL accent/speech/vowel/language posts go  here! [MERGED]-frenchdoor.png   ***The Accent Thread*** -  ALL accent/speech/vowel/language posts go  here! [MERGED]-screen-shot-2013-05-19-2.07.34   ***The Accent Thread*** -  ALL accent/speech/vowel/language posts go  here! [MERGED]-screen-shot-2013-05-19-2.05.42  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2013, 04:28 PM
 
131 posts, read 480,424 times
Reputation: 134
I live in Detroit and this is my thoughts. My grandfather was from Windsor. Two of my three bothers married Canadian woman. I've gone back and forth over the border all my life. I can often tell the difference Canadian and US accents, but the difference is subtle. It is usually in vowels and my accuracy is in the range of 70% -- hardly perfect.

While are the accents so similar? When I was a kid in the 1960s, the Jewish community in Windsor and Detroit were linked to the extent that there was a shuttle bus running back and forth between the two centers and went to the same overnight camps. Moving beyond my ethnicity, Detroiters and Windsorites watched the same TV, listen to the same radio, shopped in the same stores, ate in the same restaurants, went to the same amusement parks, generally went to and generally rooted for the same teams,* and often dated one another. If you visit any marina in this part of the world, the boats docked there are half and half. Is it surprising that we use the same slang, have similar accents, etc.

It is not just Detroit. Since most major Canadian cities are within 100 miles of the US border, this story repeated in many places. Buffalo/Toronto, Seattle/Vancouver, and Montreal/Upstate New York. We have many border towns where you have one community on both sides of the border. Google on the Haskle Free Library or CanUSA Blvd for examples about how blurry the border gets. I am going to Pt Roberts Washington next week which is another example.

If you look at the exceptions that I can easily think of Edmonton is an oil town with lots of temporary workers, consultants, etc. working there at any given time. Ottawa/Gastineau is the nation's capital. Not only is there a high turnover of residents and their accent will probably standardize closely to the "perfect Canadian accent" in terms of being a merge of everything. St Johns Newfoundland obviously doesn't meet this model, but I've heard plenty of jokes about Newfie accents.

Then there is cross border summer homes. Canadians are permitted in the United States six months a year. Yanks are permitted in Canada for equally long periods (but less precisely defined). Many people have their second property in the other country.

My brother lived in the UK until last year. Between 2000 and 2012, I went 11 times to the UK. That's a lot. Between 2000 and 2012, I probably I probably crossed the Canadian border 250 times (disclaimer most of border crossings were for three hours or less).


--------------------
*A few Windsorites unfortunately rooted for the Maples Leafs. The nerve!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2013, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,010,075 times
Reputation: 11640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I noticed the different spelling when I was back on a Canadian plane heading home. So both spellings are used. Is there a reason or preference in using tirer over tirez and vice versa?


For fun I did a photo search using " France tirer " and " France tirez". Totally unscientific of course, but it only brought up possible images using tirez.
Not sure of the reasons why. I was paying attention over the weekend and it seems "Tirez" is more prevalent here in Quebec as well. "Tirer" you see all over the place as well but not as often.

FYI "Tirez" is the imperatif verb tense. In a sense it sort of gives an order. Like "You... pull!"

As for "Tirez" it is a short form for "Veuillez tirer" (the "veuillez" is understood and omitted when they write "Tirer"). This technically means "please pull".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2013, 11:53 AM
 
115 posts, read 131,493 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Libnani View Post
Why is it that here in Canada, our English accent is like American English, yet our spelling is mostly British, whereas in other English-speaking countries, like Ireland, Australia, New Zeeland and South Africa, their accent is very British and its spelling ?!

However, there are few words used in Canada pronounced different than the U.S., such as Kilometer (In Quebec at least, not sure in rest of Canada), we pronounce "Kiloohmeter" while in the U.S. they prounounce "Kilaahmeters".

Well I for one can tell where a person is from in Canada by their accent, as much as I can tell an Aussie, Kiwi, Affrikaner and different British accents. I can also tell Americans by their accents. There are roughly 25 main regional accents in North America.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top