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Old 07-18-2013, 04:22 PM
 
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I don't pretend to know the reason(s) why we sound similar to Americans, that is just one of the theories that is taught in linguistics today.
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I wonder if some Canadian actors try to "sound American" when they are performing.
Not unless they are portraying an American. It is different though for Canadian actors living in the U.S. A friend of mine who went to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts was told to lose his Canadian accent if he wanted more work.

Last edited by Natnasci; 07-18-2013 at 06:47 PM..
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:58 PM
 
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I'm a Canadian who moved to the southeast USA in 1997. The longer I am here -- the stronger the Canadian accent I hear when i go back to Canada for a visit.

I can even spot a reporter or someone on TV and identify them as 'Canadian'. There is a differen tone, accent....inflection.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:12 PM
 
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Posted this in another thread....

As a Canadian who moved to the suotheast USA 16 years ago...I notice the Canadian accents more and more the longer I am away from home. I can easily spot someone on TV who is a Canadian journalist now working in the States.

It isn't just how the words are pronounced but the inflection of the words.
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Old 07-19-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Not unless they are portraying an American. It is different though for Canadian actors living in the U.S. A friend of mine who went to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts was told to lose his Canadian accent if he wanted more work.
I don't think most Americans recognize a Canadian accent, whether Anglo-Canadian or French-Canadian. Can you recognize Canadians on American programs?
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I don't think most Americans recognize a Canadian accent, whether Anglo-Canadian or French-Canadian. Can you recognize Canadians on American programs?
Maybe in the south they don't, but in California a lot do. My friend had to practice to elongate his vowels in words such as " out " . He also had to lose a lot of the inflections in his speech. Not to forget to start using terms that we don't here in B.C. such as electric bill for hydro etc, garbage disposal for garburator, washroom etc. He now, after over 25 years of living in the U.S. sounds very American to me and not at all Canadian.
Those who don't recognize where the accent is from, do recognize an accent. I've been asked many times when visiting where I'm from and then they mention the accent.

As for Canadians on American programs it depends. If they are acting an American part, they will do an American accent....just like Nicole Kidman does.

It a weird feeling though to truly hear your own accent. Even though I can pick out pretty quickly if someone is Canadian, ( even though my French is terrible, I can still hear the difference between Quebecois French and French from France, other French accents, not so much )
I never really heard our accent until once at an airport.
I had been away from Canada for 2 months and did not meet or speak with another Canadian in that time. It was before the internet so I didn't even listen to a Canadian recorded voice.
I was changing planes at Heathrow on my way home when I heard two guys speaking. The only way I can describe our accent was that it was like two birds cooing. I could hear how we said our vowels. I look down at the tags on their suitcases and could see they were from Toronto. I listened intently knowing that in a few minutes my ears would accustom themselves back and I would not hear the accent for much longer.
It truly was a strange experience....coo coo coo coo

Last edited by Natnasci; 07-19-2013 at 12:08 PM..
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Old 07-19-2013, 01:12 PM
 
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As an American from California (living near San Francisco), here is my take. Aside from saying "eh" at the end of sentences, most of what people in America know of Canadian accents tends to be what we hear on tv (I'm sure it is true the other way around). For example, most of the shows we see on HGTV take place in Canada (Toronto). This goes along the lines of "how-se", "abow-t", etc.

I've been to 4 provinces in Canada, and here is my take:

British Columbia - Been to Vancouver and Victoria. Very tough to detect the accent from what I'm accustomed to here in California.
Ontario - Been to Toronto, Niagara Falls, Windsor. Accent sounds much like what I hear on HGTV
Quebec - Been to Montreal, Quebec City, Charlevoix region. Doesn't sound Canadian to me at all. Sounds like an accent of someone from France, only a bit more wraspy.
Alberta - Been to Edmonton, Calgary, Jasper and Banff. This was where I found the Canadian accent to be the most pronounced. All I can say is that it sounded like someone from Minnesota/Wisconsin, only much more dramatic.
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Old 07-19-2013, 01:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by darrensmooth View Post
In the US I would say that rural people can have different accents altogether than their Urban counterparts..but accents are transitive and it seems that standard American is growing in popularity even in the South (but not so much the Northern Cities near the Great Lakes)
Very true. There is a stigma here in the US that the southern drawl signifies that a lack of intelligence, education, sophistication, etc. I've read that its similar to how people in France perceive those in rural Quebec. I don't think its necessarily true, but it has become a stereotype, just as the British accent is a mark of intelligence.
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Old 07-19-2013, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadwarrior101 View Post
As an American from California (living near San Francisco), here is my take. Aside from saying "eh" at the end of sentences, most of what people in America know of Canadian accents tends to be what we hear on tv (I'm sure it is true the other way around). For example, most of the shows we see on HGTV take place in Canada (Toronto). This goes along the lines of "how-se", "abow-t", etc.

I've been to 4 provinces in Canada, and here is my take:

British Columbia - Been to Vancouver and Victoria. Very tough to detect the accent from what I'm accustomed to here in California.
Ontario - Been to Toronto, Niagara Falls, Windsor. Accent sounds much like what I hear on HGTV
Quebec - Been to Montreal, Quebec City, Charlevoix region. Doesn't sound Canadian to me at all. Sounds like an accent of someone from France, only a bit more wraspy.
Alberta - Been to Edmonton, Calgary, Jasper and Banff. This was where I found the Canadian accent to be the most pronounced. All I can say is that it sounded like someone from Minnesota/Wisconsin, only much more dramatic.
I bet though, that wherever you went in Canada, people would eventually hear your accent and peg you for American. I do agree though, that some folks from California speak very similar to people in Vancouver and it may take me a bit longer to pick up the accent, but I eventually do.
As for the Quebecois accent, to anyone familiar with French, the difference is very noticeable, and Quebecois sounds very French-Canadian.

Last edited by Natnasci; 07-19-2013 at 02:06 PM..
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:25 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
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From my experience, it's the Americans that say "a-bowt" and "how-se" vs us who say it more like "a boat" and "h-oh-se". French Canadian accents for most obviously sound different because they speak a different language than English. This applies for French Canadians across Canada. Some, though, when speaking English, sound indistinguishable from English Canadians. Especially some politicians. For the most part anglophones in Quebec sound like Ontarians, though. I'm not certain, but I'm guessing anglophones in the Lower North Shore sound more like Newfoundlanders, and anglophones around the Gaspe and the Magdalen Islands sound more like Maritimers.
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