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Old 10-26-2013, 04:14 AM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,742,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
Does the American and Canadian accents have a bigger difference from each other than the New Zealand and Australian accents?
I think it really depends on what you're used to. Being an Aussie, I find the New Zealand accent to be very, very different, and there are often plenty of "huh?" moments when I'm listening to a Kiwi. What's "whut fush" all about, and what's "eel tin" got to do with finding something at the supermarket? Aus and NZ are 2,000 km apart, and often that's pretty apparent. But someone from North America or Europe, might not hear the contrast that starkly.
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Old 10-26-2013, 05:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipcat View Post
Yes. Most people don't realize that the Southern accent has the largest group of speakers in the US, and the Great Lakes, and Northeastern accents sound distinct from the typical Canadian accent. But I can still pick out a New Zealand accent from an Australian accent. Aussie sounds more nasally to me.
Ironically, California accent is closer to Canadian accent then American accents closer to
Canada, like great lakes/northeast accents you mentioned.

In other words a Torontonian sounds more like a Californian then a Buffalonian,
even though Buffalo, NY is less then 100 miles away from Toronto.
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Old 10-26-2013, 05:36 AM
 
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I basically consider the Canadian accent to be very close to an American accent but with a bit of a Scottish/Northern English flavor. It's very similar to the accent in Washington, Oregon and northern California, and urban people under 40 throughout the United States, but they pronounce some words differently, like "PRO-gress", "aboat", and "alreet".

The exceptions of course would be Quebec which is mostly French speaking and Newfoundland which has an accent that sounds very Irish and much less similar to an American accent than most of Canada.
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Old 10-26-2013, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
1,682 posts, read 3,300,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LRUA View Post
Ironically, California accent is closer to Canadian accent then American accents closer to
Canada, like great lakes/northeast accents you mentioned.

In other words a Torontonian sounds more like a Californian then a Buffalonian,
even though Buffalo, NY is less then 100 miles away from Toronto.
I live in So Cal, and I hear similarities with the Canadian and Californian accents. But there are still a few noticeable differences from my So Cal perspective. Especially the OU sounds, and the rounded vowels for the words Dollar and College. I was in Vancouver,BC and heard those pronunciations frequently.

Last edited by hipcat; 10-26-2013 at 11:52 AM..
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Old 10-26-2013, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
1,682 posts, read 3,300,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
I basically consider the Canadian accent to be very close to an American accent but with a bit of a Scottish/Northern English flavor. It's very similar to the accent in Washington, Oregon and northern California, and urban people under 40 throughout the United States, but they pronounce some words differently, like "PRO-gress", "aboat", and "alreet".

The exceptions of course would be Quebec which is mostly French speaking and Newfoundland which has an accent that sounds very Irish and much less similar to an American accent than most of Canada.
I'd say the stereotypical Canadian accent is closer to the Upper Midwestern accents like in Minnesota/Northern Wisconsin/Upper Michigan, with a Scottish modification.

This Border Patrol officer sounds stereotypically Canadian to me.


USA Ontario Border Crossing Regulations www.pinesunsetlodge.com - YouTube
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Old 10-26-2013, 03:55 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,096,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hipcat View Post
I'd say the stereotypical Canadian accent is closer to the Upper Midwestern accents like in Minnesota/Northern Wisconsin/Upper Michigan, with a Scottish modification.

This Border Patrol officer sounds stereotypically Canadian to me.


USA Ontario Border Crossing Regulations www.pinesunsetlodge.com - YouTube
Yes, you're very correct. I don't think I would be able to tell that that fellow was American just by talking to him. I would have thought that people in those places would sound more like Detroiters or Buffalonians (are those the correct words?) with the "this is my mahm and this is my dyad" sort of accent, but I suppose I was mistaken.
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Old 10-26-2013, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Mexico-Ajijic
45 posts, read 76,340 times
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Remember that education has a lot to do with so-called accents, anywhere. Also in spite of having the Académie, France has many regional accents and varieties of speech. Even the so-called Parisian accent has an educated and a street version and to my ears, the street version is ugly.

In Quebec there's a big difference between country and city accents, east vs west as well so don't generalize. I get tired of people talking about ugly Quebec French when they really mean the country accent and forget about the ugly accents in France (parts of the south for example). Often to someone who is French or fluent in French, the educated Quebec accent is musical and lilting. I personally don't understand well the heavily-accented Acadian French spoken in New Brunswick.

I have never heard a Canadian say "aboot" (Americans are not known for their linguistic skills and apparently don't hear phonemes properly!), and the only Canadians who might say "eh" are not well educated. Raising, yes, is a linguistic phenomenon in Canada esp. amongst younger people in the 80s and 90s but I can't say how it is now. Once again, educated people don't "raise". Canadians in general articulate better than Americans and that may account for some of the differences that people perceive.
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Old 10-26-2013, 10:01 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,674 posts, read 3,096,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell236 View Post
Remember that education has a lot to do with so-called accents, anywhere. Also in spite of having the Académie, France has many regional accents and varieties of speech. Even the so-called Parisian accent has an educated and a street version and to my ears, the street version is ugly.

In Quebec there's a big difference between country and city accents, east vs west as well so don't generalize. I get tired of people talking about ugly Quebec French when they really mean the country accent and forget about the ugly accents in France (parts of the south for example). Often to someone who is French or fluent in French, the educated Quebec accent is musical and lilting. I personally don't understand well the heavily-accented Acadian French spoken in New Brunswick.

I have never heard a Canadian say "aboot" (Americans are not known for their linguistic skills and apparently don't hear phonemes properly!), and the only Canadians who might say "eh" are not well educated. Raising, yes, is a linguistic phenomenon in Canada esp. amongst younger people in the 80s and 90s but I can't say how it is now. Once again, educated people don't "raise". Canadians in general articulate better than Americans and that may account for some of the differences that people perceive.
Ouch! I say it very frequently and I come from a rather wealthy background.
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Old 10-27-2013, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Mexico-Ajijic
45 posts, read 76,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
Ouch! I say it very frequently and I come from a rather wealthy background.

Did I say "class"? I did not. I said education. Your wealth (your parents' wealth) has little to do with it. Since I'm part of academe I can assure you that Canadians in that milieu do not say "aboot" or "eh".
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Old 10-27-2013, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
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My friend is a nuclear engineer up at Darlington. Another is a civil engineer in Toronto.

They both say "eh" all the time.
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