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Old 01-29-2014, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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I think the focus on a 'national' identify is rather tiresome and distorts any type of focus on what is important. What is important is that we are a stable, free democracy with a great human capital and we are blessed with a huge land of plentiful natural resources and natural beauty. We are a beacon of hope for many around the world and are consistently rated as one of the best countries to inhabit. So - what is the problem? We are a collection of various identities and somehow it all works beautifully... Other countries with 'identities' are so stuck in the past and in history that they can't see the forest for the trees.
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,602,075 times
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Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
I think the focus on a 'national' identify is rather tiresome and distorts any type of focus on what is important. What is important is that we are a stable, free democracy with a great human capital and we are blessed with a huge land of plentiful natural resources and natural beauty. We are a beacon of hope for many around the world and are consistently rated as one of the best countries to inhabit. So - what is the problem? We are a collection of various identities and somehow it all works beautifully... Other countries with 'identities' are so stuck in the past and in history that they can't see the forest for the trees.
Yes, and in many ways the land is Canada's identity.
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Old 01-29-2014, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,556 posts, read 20,837,820 times
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
True. The OP's question is confusing to me. Is Australia really more British? Is it just the stark accent difference that makes the OP think this.
Personality wise, I compare Australians to Americans and Canadians to New Zealanders.
I'm trying to think what is more British in Australia, besides rugby and cricket? In fact the monarchy is more popular in Canada than Australia. We don't have States etc.

On the surface it may look like Anglo Canada ( all of them ) is more British than Australia but both countries are DEFINITELY neither.
The list is pretty long.

People - more British by ancestry, a lot more British immigrants today/people born in the UK. You meet far more Brits than Americans here, can't say the same for Canada.

Fish'n'chip's shops everywhere

Meat pies

Lots of English-style afternoon tea places with scones with jam and cream, earl grey tea etc. An obsession with Englishness in some of the pleasure gardens though I suspect Canada has that too.

Slang - mate, bloody, crickey, bugger - yep, they're all British slang. Rhyming slang

Our language in general. We generally use the British spellings.etc as well as having an accent that is more similar.

Traditionally those who could afford to went on a pilgrimage to Britain, the 'mother country.' We considered ourselves basically a colony until fairly recently.

The monarchy is probably more popular in Canada because their influence was never as pervasive/felt as here. Until the 1970s a lot of newsreaders etc affected a wannabe British accent. Many of our greatest were educated in Oxford or Cambridge. My Canadian friend said some Canadians support the monarchy only as a way to distinguish themselves from America. We never had that need.

We drive on the left, like in the UK.

Parliament, legal system.

Don't have states? Well the UK doesn't have provinces either. Does that make Canada more like China than the UK? haha
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Old 01-29-2014, 07:05 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,744,108 times
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
True. The OP's question is confusing to me. Is Australia really more British? Is it just the stark accent difference that makes the OP think this.
Personality wise, I compare Australians to Americans and Canadians to New Zealanders.
I'm trying to think what is more British in Australia, besides rugby and cricket? In fact the monarchy is more popular in Canada than Australia. We don't have States etc.

On the surface it may look like Anglo Canada ( all of them ) is more British than Australia but both countries are DEFINITELY neither.
I agree with you 100%. And what's with this Canadian obsession with countries being either British or American?

Believe it or not, there are a lot a things about Canada that seem very "British" influenced to an Aussie, but that's what they are - influences. But Australia seems a lot more comfortable being Australian than Canada does being Canadian.
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Old 01-29-2014, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Yes, and in many ways the land is Canada's identity.
And there isn't anything wrong with that.. We have all kinds of identities - we're a huge country with cultures across the spectrum - yet there is a harmony about the place that is unlike any other... we should all be proud of what we have. The more I travel, the more proud I am to be a Canadian.
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Old 01-29-2014, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
. But Australia seems a lot more comfortable being Australian than Canada does being Canadian.
There's a lot about being Canadian that is based on tolerance of difference... it is ubiquitously Canadian to be tolerant and respectful of difference... if that is not our identity than perhaps it should because we do it so well and we are very comfortable with religious, sexual and racial harmony - are we utopic? no but few countries' citizens work as cooperatively and respectfully with so many different groups as Canadians do with eachother.
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Old 01-29-2014, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by the postman View Post
the list is pretty long.

People - more british by ancestry, a lot more british immigrants today/people born in the uk. You meet far more brits than americans here, can't say the same for canada.

i tried to find stats on percentage of new immigrants to both countries but couldn't pin down numbers from reliable sources. Trying to find the percentage of people claiming british ancestry was a bit all over the map but seem to put australia at 31 percent and canada at 24 percent. However again there seems overlapping of irish and scottish in the mix. Have you had better luck and then post your sources?
I actually do know and meet many, many people from the uk in canada.


fish'n'chip's shops everywhere

i wouldn't' say that in vancouver fish'n chip shops are everywhere but, again unscientific, but googling" fish and chips" brings up 7 just in my area, however my area is not all of canada. Crossing over to victoria our capital, i'm sure there are much more. Also canada's maritimes and newfoundland are littered with them.
I haven't been to australia, so the term everywhere means? Hundreds in sydney or 30? Using google maps toronto seems to have about 30.
However, every diner, pub, sports bar in canada serves fish'n'chips as well.

meat pies

we eat meat pies in canada and cornish pasties.. Every frozen food section in every supermarket sells them. Some packaging with the union jack on them..can't remember the brand. We also have an aussie meat pie truck in vancouver and let's not forget the most famous canadian meat pie from quebec, tourtiere.
The difference is that we don't eat meat pies at sporting events. I asked earlier if they do in the uk, but haven't seen an answer yet. So if they don't in the uk and your point about meat pies is that you have them, albeit aussie style, then it's not really a point.


lots of english-style afternoon tea places with scones with jam and cream, earl grey tea etc. An obsession with englishness in some of the pleasure gardens though i suspect canada has that too.

in canada as well. High tea is served in a lot of high end hotels, but they do that in the states as well. Tea shops are plentiful in victoria and the maritimes. There is one within walking distance from me in vancouver.
Yes, canada is filled with english style gardens and they are an obsession especially since many parts of canada have such " english " weather.


slang - mate, bloody, crickey, bugger - yep, they're all british slang. Rhyming slang

we don't do rhyming slang. We do use bugger, and bloody. Not crickey, but people do say " i'm feeling a bit peckish"…well certain generations maybe.

our language in general. We generally use the british spellings.etc as well as having an accent that is more similar.

we use british spellings as well. Cheque, neighbour, colour etc. We don't spell curb, kerb, though and only use truck and elevator…but australia seems to use truck and lorry and elevator and lift? Is that correct?


traditionally those who could afford to went on a pilgrimage to britain, the 'mother country.' we considered ourselves basically a colony until fairly recently.

that is interesting, i'm sure some brits in canada did as well, was that many years ago, since if only 31 percent consider themselves of english heritage, the other's mother country isn't britain?
I guess we could go back and check the populations percentages of british immigrants over time. I know canada had a much higher percentage way back when.


the monarchy is probably more popular in canada because their influence was never as pervasive/felt as here. Until the 1970s a lot of newsreaders etc affected a wannabe british accent. Many of our greatest were educated in oxford or cambridge. My canadian friend said some canadians support the monarchy only as a way to distinguish themselves from america. We never had that need.

some believe that the monarchy is more popular in canada for that reason and there is some truth to it. However canada over the years has received many more royal visits, in fact canada is the country most visited by the queen outside of the u.k. So good old fashion pr may have something to do with it as well. It's not hard to find canadians who have met or at least seen the queen, phillip etc.
A lot of canadians are actually quite ambivalent about the monarchy as an institution. Sure certain people love the spectacle, but many, myself included, would not be sad to see them go, but keep the parliamentary tradition.


we drive on the left, like in the uk.

so does japan…look at your comment below

parliament, legal system.

you surprise me…you did know canada does have a parliamentary system as well? So i'm not sure why this would make australia more british?

don't have states? Well the uk doesn't have provinces either. Does that make canada more like china than the uk? Haha
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Old 01-29-2014, 11:34 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,744,108 times
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
1
I suspect the Postman was using some of those as a conversation starter.

Come to Australia and use colloquial British slang, rhyming slang or talk about "lorries" driving down the road, then get ready to see a lot of blank and uncomprehending faces looking at you.

Your search for a British style fish and chip shop will see you searching for a long, long time in most cities and towns. Best to take take lunch and a map with you.

Meat pies? Yeh, my grandparents used to talk about them. And Cornish pasties...ummmm, how are they different to normal pasties......and what is a pastie anyway?
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Old 01-29-2014, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,222 posts, read 16,455,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
I suspect the Postman was using some of those as a conversation starter.

Come to Australia and use colloquial British slang, rhyming slang or talk about "lorries" driving down the road, then get ready to see a lot of blank and uncomprehending faces looking at you.

Your search for a British style fish and chip shop will see you searching for a long, long time in most cities and towns. Best to take take lunch and a map with you.

Meat pies? Yeh, my grandparents used to talk about them. And Cornish pasties...ummmm, how are they different to normal pasties......and what is a pastie anyway?


I don't think the CD TOS allows me to post a picture of a pastie. lol
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Old 01-30-2014, 04:39 AM
 
Location: Vic, Australia
85 posts, read 154,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Traditionally those who could afford to went on a pilgrimage to Britain, the 'mother country.' We considered ourselves basically a colony until fairly recently.

In W.A. maybe, certainly not here in Victoria for the last more than 100 years. Probably why we wanted to become a republic and no one else did.
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