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Old 01-31-2014, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,552,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Good that you picked up on that.

I believe that across Canada high-tea is generally only served in the classic "railway" hotels - the Royal York in Toronto, Château Laurier in Ottawa, the Empress in Victoria. Most of Canada's large cities have one of these grand old hôtels in their downtowns and this is where you go for high-tea. I doubt you can find it in many other places anymore.

Interestingly enough I am pretty sure you can even have high-tea at the Château Frontenac (also a grand railway hotel) in ultra-French Quebec City!

But other than that... it's not something that's common in Canada at all.
It's interesting following threads and to see how a comment can morph into something someone never said.

Again I stated. "High tea is served in a lot of high end hotels, but they do that in the states as well."

The lists so far shows High Tea IS served in a lot of high end hotels, not just Fairmonts in Canada and the US as well.

Did you click on my links? One of them showed 9 places in Toronto alone, and they were not all Fairmonts.

Heck there is even a couple of places in Sherbrooke.

English tea - Cultural and heritage - What to do - Visitors | Tourisme Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada

Hotel Afternoon Tea, Dining - The Sherbrooke Castle Hotel
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Old 01-31-2014, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Canada
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I recently had a wonderful High Tea at the Shangri-la in Vancouver. It's definitely not an old railway hotel, it's very modern, and the tradition seems to be alive and kicking.

Addendum: I liked it so much, I regularly enjoy afternoon tea as a meal at home now whenever my schedule allows for it.

Last edited by BIMBAM; 01-31-2014 at 11:36 AM..
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Old 01-31-2014, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
It's interesting following threads and to see how a comment can morph into something someone never said.

Again I stated. "High tea is served in a lot of high end hotels, but they do that in the states as well."

The lists so far shows High Tea IS served in a lot of high end hotels, not just Fairmonts in Canada and the US as well.

Did you click on my links? One of them showed 9 places in Toronto alone, and they were not all Fairmonts.

Heck there is even a couple of places in Sherbrooke.

English tea - Cultural and heritage - What to do - Visitors | Tourisme Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada

Hotel Afternoon Tea, Dining - The Sherbrooke Castle Hotel
You're right. I was just thinking you can have high tea not too far from here at the Moorside Tea Room of Mackenzie King Estate in Gatineau Park.

You can also have high tea in Pittsburgh, Omaha and most anywhere in the US. And in Alice Springs in the Australian Outback.

So it's probably not something that makes any of the three countries "more British" than the others.
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Old 01-31-2014, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,552,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
You're right. I was just thinking you can have high tea not too far from here at the Moorside Tea Room of Mackenzie King Estate in Gatineau Park.

You can also have high tea in Pittsburgh, Omaha and most anywhere in the US. And in Alice Springs in the Australian Outback.

So it's probably not something that makes any of the three countries "more British" than the others.
Sometimes in life we only see the things we are looking for.
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Old 01-31-2014, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Sometimes in life we only see the things we are looking for.
Sorry, but Australia is still way more British than Canada is.
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Old 01-31-2014, 12:46 PM
 
1,217 posts, read 2,599,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Jonathanc, good post. However, If I can nitpick a bit, you have somewhat overstated the similarities of America and Canada in the past.

English Canada and the US were effectively settled in different time frames. Colonial French Canada certainly was settled during the same time that colonial America was being settled, but English Canada is much younger than the US. The first sizable English settlement did not emerge until the 1830's when York (Toronto) had developed into a large town, and it must be noted that the very first roots of these settlers in Canada went back to the end of the American Revolution, a few decades, at most. In comparison, the roots of American settlers went back to the early 1600's, well over a century before before. Additionally, large areas of English Canada were settled over a base Francophone population, as evidenced in Ontario, Manitoba, New Brunswick, and to a smaller extent Québec.

Population-wise, much of Canada remained effectively a frontier until the mid-1900's, and the British influence on Canada was massive when compared with the US. Not only did Canada not obtain self-government until the passing of the Statute of Westminster in 1931, but English Canada developed a sort of hybrid identity of being both British and Canadian at the same time. English Canadians were much, much, more likely to have one or more British grandparents, or parents, in the 1800's and 1900's than an American. An example of this can be seen by looking at the British population as late as the 20th century; during World War I British colonists made up a very significant 11 percent of Canada's population, and accounted for nearly 3/4 of the Canadian Expeditionary Force fighting in Europe.

All in all, this illustrates a picture of a country with a very unique cultural history, and one that significantly differs from the US.
Interesting notes on population patterns. I know the definitions of Upper and Lower Canada have likely changed over time but it's still interesting to see the population shifts.

1806
Upper Canada 70,718
Lower Canada 250,000 +353%

1831
Upper Canada 236,702
Lower Canada 553,134 +134%

1851
Upper Canada 952,004 +7%
Lower Canada 890,261

1871
Ontario 1,620,851 +36%
Quebec 1,191,516

1911
Ontario 2,527,292 +26%
Quebec 2,005,776

1966
Ontario 6,690,870 +16%
Quebec 5,780,845

2013
Ontario 13,538,000 +66%
Quebec 8,155,300

While it is true that Canada was more like Britain compared to the US, it still did not make Canada like Britain. I would argue that the majority of the population was born and bred in North America and embraced/developed into this lifestyle even though there were political ties to the motherland, the influence of which steadily declined as time went on. I think the first and second world wars were major events which helped Canada create its own identity apart from the parental Brits and it's bigger/older American sibling. This was the final period of political and sovereign transition away from Britain.

But these were also changes in the political machinery at the highest levels as opposed to actual day-to-day culture which is what I think the OP is getting at here. The lifestyle, entertainment, food, music and other activities of daily life have been much more similar between "Canada-US" than "Canada-Britain" throughout all of history regardless of who was calling the shots at the administrative helm. The fact that British governance was cut off in 1776 in the US but was severed slowly over time in Canada up to perhaps the 1940s did lead to more of a British influence in Canada for a longer period of time. But I don't think this influence could ever offset the cultural integration between the early settlers who came to this continent to start new lives. Some ended up on the north side of the modern border and some (ok, many more) on the south side due to historical migration patterns but it was essentially the same peoples who populated both countries and developed this continent into what it is today.

Last edited by johnathanc; 01-31-2014 at 01:10 PM..
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Old 01-31-2014, 01:07 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,741,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Sorry, but Australia is still way more British than Canada is.
LOL Canadian affection for the British royals, soldiers in bear skinned hats outside parliament, the house of Commons, a British House of Lords style Senate, the mounties in their very British style uniform, Canadian's very British style attitudes towards the US and Australia, curling, the famous Canadian reserved and 'polite' demeanour.


Thats just for starters.

Last edited by Richard1098; 01-31-2014 at 01:32 PM..
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Old 01-31-2014, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,552,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Sorry, but Australia is still way more British than Canada is.
LOL. I kind of hinted at this in a earlier post. I wonder if Canadians and Australians can't see the forest because of the trees.
Are we really qualified to make a stance on this? Wouldn't a person from Britain visiting both countries extensively be a better judge?

Anyway I'm just heading out to Safeway on Kind Edward Ave, just before Queen Elizabeth Park. You know the one, not far from York House School,the private one, not Sir Charles Tupper which is further along King George.
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Old 01-31-2014, 01:13 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,741,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
You're right. I was just thinking you can have high tea not too far from here at the Moorside Tea Room of Mackenzie King Estate in Gatineau Park.

You can also have high tea in Pittsburgh, Omaha and most anywhere in the US. And in Alice Springs in the Australian Outback.

So it's probably not something that makes any of the three countries "more British" than the others.
This is surreal...

The number of Aussies who have been to a British style high tea (lets face it, its a novelty event) in any year would be absolutely dwarfed by the number who participated in Octoberfest celebrations, or joined in Chinese new year celebrations. Its hardly a common or typical things thing to participate in.
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Old 01-31-2014, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
This is surreal...

The number of Aussies who have been to a British style high tea (lets face it, its a novelty event) in any year would be absolutely dwarfed by the number who participated in Octoberfest celebrations, or joined in Chinese new year celebrations. Its hardly a common or typical things thing to participate in.
It's not really typical here either. And even less in the US.

I would surmise that many Canadians probably don't even know what "high tea" or "afternoon tea" really is. And I am talking about people who live in the English-speaking parts of the country.
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