Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-06-2014, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Michigan
8 posts, read 15,629 times
Reputation: 12

Advertisements

I currently live in Michigan and am planning on moving to Windsor in a couple of months. My mother was born in Quebec, so last year I applied for my Canadian citizenship and received my certificate months later (it took an ungodly amount of time). I don't really know anyone I can ask these questions to besides the occasional border guard (a lot of them don't have time for my questions though :] ) and the internet.

1. I've been told by a border guard that I can move to Canada whenever I want. I'm assuming that's true because I'm now a citizen, but is there any sort of process I still have to go through? Besides my list declaring everything that I'm moving across with me..

2. I went to city hall in Windsor to get an application for my health card and was told that it doesn't go into effect until 3 months after I've lived in Canada. I just found out a week ago that I am pregnant, and now I'm sort of freaking out about this. I can't afford to pay out of pocket for health care for those three months, so are there any options for me?

3. I don't have a passport, so I cross the border with my enhanced drivers license. Do I need to get my Canadian passport at some point?

4. I read in another thread that even if a person moves from the US to Canada, the US still wants you to fill out tax forms? I've never heard of this and was wondering how it works?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-06-2014, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,653 posts, read 3,458,307 times
Reputation: 5644
Quote:
Originally Posted by briedle17 View Post
1. I've been told by a border guard that I can move to Canada whenever I want. I'm assuming that's true because I'm now a citizen, but is there any sort of process I still have to go through? Besides my list declaring everything that I'm moving across with me..
There is nothing further a citizen entering Canada must do. As a Canadian citizen, you have the constitutional right to enter and to leave Canada at any time.

Quote:
2. I went to city hall in Windsor to get an application for my health card and was told that it doesn't go into effect until 3 months after I've lived in Canada. I just found out a week ago that I am pregnant, and now I'm sort of freaking out about this. I can't afford to pay out of pocket for health care for those three months, so are there any options for me?
I believe that you can buy health insurance to get you through the three-month period. Look into Blue Cross or similar providers--they sell supplementary policies to cover things that provincial health providers don't, and they'd likely also sell "gap" coverage to people in your situation.

Quote:
3. I don't have a passport, so I cross the border with my enhanced drivers license. Do I need to get my Canadian passport at some point?
You'll probably want to at some point, but your citizenship card will admit you to Canada when you move here.

Quote:
4. I read in another thread that even if a person moves from the US to Canada, the US still wants you to fill out tax forms? I've never heard of this and was wondering how it works?
I believe that American citizens must file an annual tax return with the IRS. However, under a tax treaty with Canada, Americans who make less than a certain amount will not be taxed by the IRS if they pay taxes to Canada. You just need to file a return. Check with the IRS for the details.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,222 posts, read 16,486,496 times
Reputation: 13536
Hi, briedle.

I hope everything works out for you, and welcome to Windsor!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 04:46 AM
 
3,452 posts, read 4,950,902 times
Reputation: 6229
Why don't you give up your American citizenship, then you'll have no tax issues with the U.S.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 07:23 AM
 
320 posts, read 482,221 times
Reputation: 476
Some other items to consider:

Your credit history may not cross the border with you. There's been a few threads on this forum about this problem. Obviously, lack of a credit score/history affects your ability to purchase a home and so on. Something to check into...

If you're planning on bringing over $10,000 with you, don't forget to do the proper paperwork. Otherwise your money could be confiscated. I believe you can download the forms on the CBSC website, but I am not positive.

Yes, U.S. citizens, whether dual citizens or not, still need to file tax statements with the IRS. You won't owe anything if you're primary employer is Canadian-based. (It's more complicated if you, for instance. sell some of your U.S.securities and owe capital gains.) It's a pain but not scary. Also, you'll need to look out for your SS points as they will longer build up once you stop contributing. Whether you retire in the U.S. or Canada, this will affect you one day.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 08:19 AM
 
1,863 posts, read 5,160,402 times
Reputation: 1282
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctic_gardener View Post
Why don't you give up your American citizenship, then you'll have no tax issues with the U.S.
Are you serious? That sounds like a very dumb suggestion to me.

Why giving up her American citizenship? She will not have any tax issues with the US, anyway.

She will just have to file the returns, without owning any taxes to IRS, that's it. How is it a "tax issue"?

Double citizenship offers great advantages which far outweigh disadvantages.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 08:23 AM
 
1,863 posts, read 5,160,402 times
Reputation: 1282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Monkey View Post
Some other items to consider:

Your credit history may not cross the border with you. There's been a few threads on this forum about this problem. Obviously, lack of a credit score/history affects your ability to purchase a home and so on. Something to check into...

If you're planning on bringing over $10,000 with you, don't forget to do the proper paperwork. Otherwise your money could be confiscated. I believe you can download the forms on the CBSC website, but I am not positive.

Yes, U.S. citizens, whether dual citizens or not, still need to file tax statements with the IRS. You won't owe anything if you're primary employer is Canadian-based. (It's more complicated if you, for instance. sell some of your U.S.securities and owe capital gains.) It's a pain but not scary. Also, you'll need to look out for your SS points as they will longer build up once you stop contributing. Whether you retire in the U.S. or Canada, this will affect you one day.
International Programs - Totalization Agreement with Canada
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 08:30 AM
 
3,452 posts, read 4,950,902 times
Reputation: 6229
Quote:
Originally Posted by movingwiththewind View Post
Are you serious? That sounds like a very dumb suggestion to me.

Why giving up her American citizenship? She will not have any tax issues with the US, anyway.

She will just have to file the returns, without owning any taxes to IRS, that's it. How is it a "tax issue"?

Double citizenship offers great advantages which far outweigh disadvantages.
When I read the CBC, NP, or any other newspaper, the overwhelming sentiment expressed by Canadians on all of the comment boards is that dual citizenship hurts this country. People are either Canadians or not Canadians. So what are you saying here - that we should make an exception for an American? Why? What's good for the goose is good for the gander. Dual citizenship for everyone, or dual citizenship for no-one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 09:11 AM
 
1,863 posts, read 5,160,402 times
Reputation: 1282
Quote:
Originally Posted by arctic_gardener View Post
When I read the CBC, NP, or any other newspaper, the overwhelming sentiment expressed by Canadians on all of the comment boards is that dual citizenship hurts this country. People are either Canadians or not Canadians. So what are you saying here - that we should make an exception for an American? Why? What's good for the goose is good for the gander. Dual citizenship for everyone, or dual citizenship for no-one.
What are you even talking about?

MAKING AN EXCEPTION FOR AN AMERICAN? What are you talking about? Are you drunk?

As for dual citizenship hurting a country, I was talking from the point of view of a PERSON having dual citizenship, not from a point of view of a country, if it's relavant at all.

Let me ask you a simple question: What did you suggest the OP to relinquish her American citizenship for?

"Dual citizenship for everyone, or dual citizenship for no-one"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2014, 11:10 AM
 
3,452 posts, read 4,950,902 times
Reputation: 6229
Quote:
Originally Posted by movingwiththewind View Post
What are you even talking about?

MAKING AN EXCEPTION FOR AN AMERICAN? What are you talking about? Are you drunk?

As for dual citizenship hurting a country, I was talking from the point of view of a PERSON having dual citizenship, not from a point of view of a country, if it's relavant at all.

Let me ask you a simple question: What did you suggest the OP to relinquish her American citizenship for?

"Dual citizenship for everyone, or dual citizenship for no-one"
Alright, movingwiththewind, I think you're just trolling, because nobody can be THIS obtuse. Drunk? Seems like you're the drunk one on this board.
Are you even a Canadian? You don't seem to be up to date with current affairs in Canada. Canadians don't approve of people holding dual citizenship, period. During the Israel-Lebanon war in 2006, thousands of dual Lebanese-Canadians living in Lebanon at the time demanded to be rescued and repatriated to Canada. Did you miss the furore it created in Canada? I guess you did, because any true-blooded Canadian would remember what I'm talking about.

Let me also tell you something. I would love to keep the citizenship of my home country as well as that of Canada because my home country's passport allows me to travel home without applying for visas. Yet I choose not to, because dual citizenship is frowned upon in this country. When I'm not allowed by society to keep two passports because my home country is a developing nation, why do you want an American to be allowed to keep two passports? Do we have separate rules for Americans and people from developing nations?

Do I make myself clear? If this American can be encouraged to keep his/her American passport, then I should be allowed to keep the passport of MY home country. Is that a concept so difficult to understand for you, movingwiththewind? That is what I meant by my last sentence in the previous post, which you apparently have great difficult grasping.

Dual citizenship is completely legal in Canada but it is not something approved of by most Canadians. As a Canadian, I'm surprised you're not aware of that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top