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Old 12-04-2007, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Grandview Heights, OH
127 posts, read 925,055 times
Reputation: 113

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Hey all you wonderful Canadian folks, how are you all up north? I was just wondering about the far, remote northern reaches of your fine country. More specifically the Yukon, Nunavut, and the Northwest Territories. What is up there? Is there any infastructure or towns what so ever? I know about Yellowknife in the Yukon, is that a decent place? I have always been amazed by the size and sheer borders of northern Canada as it seems like not even many Canadians would have been there. Anyway, if you could help me out with any info/photos/stories on these far reaching but isolated areas I would be very pleased.
One last thing: Would an Australian such as myself survive a journey into the great outback of the northern hemisphere?
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Old 12-04-2007, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
9,019 posts, read 14,293,297 times
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There's a great deal of space and not a lot of people.

Yellowknife would be the closest thing to a city in the Northwest Territories. Whitehorse in the Yukon is the capital there. and Iqualuit in Nuunavut is their captial.

Total population north of 60 is likely under 100,000.

If you want to go during the summer there are several roads and can drive as far north as Tuktoyuktuk, but be prepared for hundreds of miles of nothing. In the winter, it's not really recommended.

Since you're an Aussie, I'd say imagine driving from Perth to Darwin, directly, but cold instead of hot. Replace flies with biting blackflies and you're pretty close.

Air Canada flies to most centres up north if you want to go. I think its totally worth the experience, but everything is sort of thin on amenities.

Mike
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Old 12-04-2007, 05:32 PM
 
4,282 posts, read 15,749,873 times
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The "road" which runs from Dawson, Yukon, north to Inuvik is called the Dempster Highway, but don't let the name fool you.

The Dempster is surfaced with gravel of varying sizes; a trip on it almost guarantees a cab full of dust, several flat tires and numerous paint chips and battle scars.

Incredibly scenic and humbling area to pass through, though.


Not recomended for the family sedan.
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Old 12-04-2007, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Grandview Heights, OH
127 posts, read 925,055 times
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Hahaha, I expected it to be a fair old adventure up there. I'd love to have about a '76 Land Cruiser to take up there, they used to eat the Aussie Bush for breakfast back home!
I've looked into it a bit and flipping heck it's a long way!!! You aren't kidding about the Perth to Darwin comparison. It's about 4000 miles from where I am in Columbus, Ohio up to Tuktoyuktuk. I wouldn't be able to take a weekend off and head up there! I'm thinking about heading out for an adventure sometime next summer though...any ideas on somewhere maybe a bit closer to where I'm located? 'Scuse the ignorance fellas, but I've always been interested in Canadia but don't know alot about it to be honest!
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Old 12-05-2007, 12:35 AM
 
4,282 posts, read 15,749,873 times
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Quote:
I'd love to have about a '76 Land Cruiser to take up there, they used to eat the Aussie Bush for breakfast back home!
Lol. The issue isn't so much with the toughness of the vehicle, but rather with carrying enough spare tires to get you to the end of the road. Service stations are distinctly lacking.



The problem with wilderness adventure in most of Canada is that it simply isn't doable by automobile. The real bush tends to be cut off from access by trees, hills, muskeg, and a distinct lack of roads.

The best way to experience "real north" is to fly into a remote location by bush plane with a canoe, adventure around for a week, and then get picked up again at a predetermined location. $$$$$$$$$$$$

For those of us with a slightly smaller wallet, you could always check into a canoe adventure through Algonquin Provincial Park in eastern Ontario. Drive time from Columbus is probably 10 hours.

The Park offers 7630 square kilometers of rivers, lakes and old growth forest. Most of the park is not accessible by road. More info at Algonquin Provincial Park


If you feel competent enough to really rough it, pick an area of Ontario north of Sault Ste. Marie, get a good quality topographical atlas, plan a route, and go canoing.
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Old 12-05-2007, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Grandview Heights, OH
127 posts, read 925,055 times
Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornerguy1 View Post
If you feel competent enough to really rough it, pick an area of Ontario north of Sault Ste. Marie, get a good quality topographical atlas, plan a route, and go canoing.
Yeah, this is what I am thinking may be more along the lines of what might be a bit more realistic, and a helluva lot closer. Do I need to look out for any potential hazards while I'm up that way? (Bears, Wolves, Quebecers etc)

Now getting back to my original topic...what type of people occupy the outlying areas up north? Are they mostly English, or Aboriginals/Natives (i think that's what you guys call them...)? Are they pretty friendly and helpful up that way? What about employment up north, hows the economy and whatnot up there?
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Old 12-05-2007, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,259 posts, read 24,766,887 times
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isn't it true that you can only drive to Yellowknife a few months out of the year because you have to drive across frozen ice to get to it?
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Old 12-06-2007, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
9,019 posts, read 14,293,297 times
Reputation: 11032
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevK View Post
isn't it true that you can only drive to Yellowknife a few months out of the year because you have to drive across frozen ice to get to it?
No. There is a highway to Yellowknife, however there are a large number of communities where this is absolutely the case.

Generally really heavy equipment is moved in the winter as the ground is muskeg/permafrost and is pretty swampy when not frozen solid.

Also for the remote communities the rivers make an instant road when frozen.
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