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Old 01-30-2008, 01:38 PM
 
20 posts, read 115,423 times
Reputation: 27

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Here in Ontario they introduced in 2004 a yearly tax on the Health Card (it's called The Ontario Health Premium) that gets deducted off one's paycheck...I don't remember how much it is but it's based on your income (I do remember not being happy about it but I guess people forget it's there)...I think it can go all the way up to $900 / year (which means more expensive than the amounts I read about on this thread about BC and Alberta) for high-income earners and doesn't get deduced if you're making less than 20,000$...here's an article that I found about it from earlier this year:

Conservatives would phase-out health tax

Scroll down this page for more details on amounts etc...

Employment Regulations Info-Guide - Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre (COBSC) (http://www.canadabusiness.ca/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=CBSC_ON%2Fdisplay&lang=en&c id=1085667968698&c=GuideInfoGuide - broken link)

Here's the official Gov of Ontario page on the subject:

Ontario Health Premium (http://www.rev.gov.on.ca/english/taxes/healthpremium/index.html - broken link)
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Old 01-30-2008, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Toronto
215 posts, read 1,661,086 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadian73 View Post
Here in Ontario they introduced in 2004 a yearly tax on the Health Card (it's called The Ontario Health Premium) that gets deducted off one's paycheck...I don't remember how much it is but it's based on your income (I do remember not being happy about it but I guess people forget it's there)...I think it can go all the way up to $900 / year (which means more expensive than the amounts I read about on this thread about BC and Alberta) for high-income earners and doesn't get deduced if you're making less than 20,000$...here's an article that I found about it from earlier this year:

Conservatives would phase-out health tax

Scroll down this page for more details on amounts etc...

Employment Regulations Info-Guide - Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre (COBSC) (http://www.canadabusiness.ca/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=CBSC_ON%2Fdisplay&lang=en&c id=1085667968698&c=GuideInfoGuide - broken link)

Here's the official Gov of Ontario page on the subject:

Ontario Health Premium (http://www.rev.gov.on.ca/english/taxes/healthpremium/index.html - broken link)
kinda.
it's part of income tax. There is no special place on your paycheque (at least not on mine) that says "HEALTH TAX". just "Income tax" Within that is the health premium. In reality the "Health" premium is just a regular tax with a fancy name
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Old 02-02-2008, 01:00 AM
 
20 posts, read 115,423 times
Reputation: 27
You're are correct nickjbor, it does not appear as a separate line on my pay stub either and is simply rolled in with the general income tax amount.
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Old 02-06-2008, 09:55 AM
 
Location: White Rock Valley - Dallas
197 posts, read 1,139,132 times
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Default Not for much longer in Alberta

Calgary Herald today:

The governing Conservatives promised in their throne speech Monday to eliminate the premiums within four years if they are re-elected -- joining the Liberals, NDP and Wildrose Alliance as parties pledging to kill the $528-a-year tax.

"This is awesome," said Traya, a 30-year-old Calgarian who works at his family's restaurant, Tazza Deli and Grill."I'll probably spend it on my student loan . . . It's one less bill to pay a month."

The controversial premiums -- costing individuals $44 a month, or $88 for families -- are worth about $900 million a year to Alberta's coffers. Supporters have argued in favour of premiums because they generate revenue for the government and remind Albertans that health care is not free. Yet, they have long been a bone of contention for groups like the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, which considers them "regressive" because, unlike income tax, they aren't scaled to earnings.

"No matter who wins the election, it's a victory for Albertans," said Scott Hennig of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.
"It will give some freedom to families to make lifestyle choices and that's fantastic."

British Columbia and Ontario are the only other provinces with health-care premiums. While many large companies pick up the premiums for employees, self-employed Albertans are stuck footing the bill themselves.
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Old 02-06-2008, 02:34 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,714 times
Reputation: 10
Default HealthCare Canada

That is pretty much true BuggsBunnie. It seems to work fine.

mary claris


Quote:
Originally Posted by Buggsbunnie2006 View Post
Hi all,
i was comparing healthcare here in the States and Canada. I hear you have free healthcare in Canada. Is that true or is some amount deducted from your paycheck to kind of make up for a subsidized government-based health insurance?? Can someone please tell me how it works?? Thanks.

Last edited by Cornerguy1; 02-06-2008 at 08:31 PM.. Reason: no advertising or links to personal pages, please
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Old 02-06-2008, 02:53 PM
 
6,304 posts, read 9,023,798 times
Reputation: 8150
Quote:
Originally Posted by KBilly View Post

British Columbia and Ontario are the only other provinces with health-care premiums. While many large companies pick up the premiums for employees, self-employed Albertans are stuck footing the bill themselves.
My Canuck (in BC) pays 54 bucks a month for his healthcare premiums.

Not "free" by any means, but considering his health issues, a bargain.
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Old 02-08-2008, 07:25 PM
 
411 posts, read 1,602,589 times
Reputation: 183
We pay about $1,200 per month in premiums for 70 percent coverage of medical, dental and prescription. That extra 30 percent we pay out of pocket adds up to several thousand dollars a year for our family of four.

When Americans scream about how high our taxes would have to be to pay for universal medical coverage, my reply is that it can't possibly be more than the $16,000 we pay out of pocket annually. And that's without a major illness in the family. Ridiculous.
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Old 02-09-2008, 04:08 AM
 
19 posts, read 108,404 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buggsbunnie2006 View Post
Hi all,
i was comparing healthcare here in the States and Canada. I hear you have free healthcare in Canada. Is that true or is some amount deducted from your paycheck to kind of make up for a subsidized government-based health insurance?? Can someone please tell me how it works?? Thanks.
It's as simple as this...my son works in canada, doesn't have a steady, full time job yet, and he pays $43 dollars quarterly to have full benefits of doctor visits, surgery, exrays...everything but prescription drugs. Basically, anything that your family doctor prescribes, whether it be specialists, x-rays, etc. it is all paid for here in canada. No insurance companies to deal with here folks with regard to healthcare. Everyone has the same opportunity to get good healthcare at a minimal charge. But, Heh! we pay some bigger taxes than the U.S does. Would I change it? Not for a second!! I like it when I don't have to worry about insurance companys and fighting tooth and nail, as I've seen with some US citizens. It breaks my heart to hear what some of the US good hard working peopld have to deal with as far as medical goes.
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Old 02-11-2008, 02:55 PM
edk
 
Location: Toronto
95 posts, read 543,833 times
Reputation: 77
Or to put it another way - I had some eye surgery a few weeks ago. Some dried blood had gotten into my eyeball, affecting my vision, and the surgeon had to open up the eyeball, replace the fluid, and close it. Extremely complex; the eye surgeon was a professor at the University of Toronto medical school.

As a resident of Ontario and a taxpayer the cost to me was - nothing, nada, zip. I can imagine what that would have cost in the US, or how much I would have had to have paid for an insurance policy that would have covered it.
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Old 02-16-2008, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Toronto
215 posts, read 1,661,086 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by edk View Post
Or to put it another way - I had some eye surgery a few weeks ago. Some dried blood had gotten into my eyeball, affecting my vision, and the surgeon had to open up the eyeball, replace the fluid, and close it. Extremely complex; the eye surgeon was a professor at the University of Toronto medical school.

As a resident of Ontario and a taxpayer the cost to me was - nothing, nada, zip. I can imagine what that would have cost in the US, or how much I would have had to have paid for an insurance policy that would have covered it.
One important thing to note is that there is no crap about "pre-existing conditions" You could move to Canada, get your health card, and get treatment even if you have cancer. I dont know which specific treatments are free, but it's not like the US where if you can be "too sick to get coverage". Everyone gets covered.
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