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Old 05-21-2016, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Toronto
13,704 posts, read 14,002,382 times
Reputation: 4563

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
Um, okay.

Some of us, I'm afraid, don't have any problem with transgender individuals. I can't help but think that, because you're Canadian, you get a pass for that remark in the Canadian threads. An American saying something similar absolutely would not. Anyway...
Nah not a free pass.. You must know reading these threads in the Canada forums that Lieneke is often at odds with other Canadian posters (including myself) in here with respect to his political views. I'm not surprised about Lieneke's conservatism when it comes to social matters tbh..
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Old 05-21-2016, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Toronto
13,704 posts, read 14,002,382 times
Reputation: 4563
Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
I don't disagree with you. I disagree with those Canadians who have this mentality that everything evil is American, that Canada can do no wrong, that America offers nothing of value and that Canada is defined by being the perfect version of America. Canada = rainbows, roses, chocolate fountains and peace. America = war, fatsos, lazies, racists, mass violence, Hell.

This is what Americans think of Canadians, by and large:


How Canadians view Americans:


Canadians are humble and friendly. Americans are rude and arrogant. Except the above view shows the exact opposite. The Americans are largely collegiate and positive when describing their neighbor. The Canadians are rude and narrow-minded.

I agree whole-heartedly with this American's perspective:


Everybody hates Americans: My life abroad as the maligned Other - Salon.com
I told you earlier Manitopiaaa that you should be very careful getting your information from so many online sources.. I would NEVER frame my views of Americans from reading City Data or watching TV/Movies. After visiting over 20 States in the U.S and having many good American friends I can balance my views tremendously by simply getting to know real people instead of what some article or youtube video tells me etc.

Ignorant people are everywhere but I strongly believe on both sides of the border they are in the minority. Don't get sucked into that trap!
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Old 05-21-2016, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN -
9,588 posts, read 5,273,473 times
Reputation: 11085
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
Of course Canadians are moving South. It's cold up North. Snowbirds are a dime a dozen. The US has sunny beaches year round, but the best ones are more comfortable in the winter months.

Income is perhaps a little higher in Canada. For example, in some Canadian cities, teachers earn $104,000CAD after 10 years of service. Even with the dollar conversion, that's still better than most, if not all, cities in the US.

Canadians like dual Canadian/U.S. citizenship, that's all. The US hands out citizenship to people they want - like the javascript guy; Gosling.
Teacher salaries in the US greatly vary from state to state. Yes, some states pay teachers pathetically. But, in the Midwest, including Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, and even Indiana, teachers are paid very well (in Michigan, they can earn well over $100,000). The same can be said for New England, some mid-Atlantic states, Wyoming, and Nevada (I worked with a fellow Canadian in Michigan who, after returning to school to earn her teaching certificate, accepted a teaching job in Nevada because the offer was so good). That's a heck of a lot of teachers we're talking about.

No, we don't live in the US only because we "like dual Canadian/US citizenship." Some of us actually enjoy living in the US, you know? It's not a perfect place, God knows, but some of us have moved around enough to know that no place is. The US can annoy me, no question, but I love her enough that I'm unlikely to ever leave her. If I had wanted to return to Canada, I would have by now.

I don't really care about people's politics on an individual level, as long as people are open to other ideas. When you get right down to it, people are people. But the reason I like the US so much, and Tennessee in particular, regardless of obvious issues, is because the people are the warmest, friendliest, and most welcoming of any place I have ever lived, bar none. So please do not attempt to speak for all Canadian-Americans.
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Old 05-21-2016, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Beautiful British Columbia 🇨🇦
528 posts, read 407,662 times
Reputation: 938
As someone whose parents are immigrant doctors, I know for a fact that doctors get paid a lot more in the US than in any other country, including Canada, unless you work in the northern territories (and the reason the pay is so good there is because it's more needy since doctors generally don't want to work there). Additionally, since the US allocates more of its money to science, more STEM workers choose the US as well. And the most brilliant students end up in Ivy League schools and the like. The fact that the US attracts the smartest people in the world is a crucial part of what makes it a superpower. Combine that with its military, and you have both brains and brawn; an unstoppable duo.

Unfortunately, in this cruel world, countries don't need ethics to be superpowers, so Canada's "niceness" compared to most other countries makes it likable (and IMO a better country) but not a superpower.
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Old 05-21-2016, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Toronto
13,704 posts, read 14,002,382 times
Reputation: 4563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
As someone whose parents are immigrant doctors, I know for a fact that doctors get paid a lot more in the US than in any other country, including Canada, unless you work in the northern territories (and the reason the pay is so good there is because it's more needy since doctors generally don't want to work there). Additionally, since the US allocates more of its money to science, more STEM workers choose the US as well. And the most brilliant students end up in Ivy League schools and the like. The fact that the US attracts the smartest people in the world is a crucial part of what makes it a superpower. Combine that with its military, and you have both brains and brawn; an unstoppable duo.

Unfortunately, in this cruel world, countries don't need ethics to be superpowers, so Canada's "niceness" compared to most other countries makes it likable (and IMO a better country) but not a superpower.
There's also no other example of a first world nation with the population that is the U.S. The U.S has done a remarkably good job in providing a good QOL/opportunity for a large number of people. There is no other nation on earth that has as prosperous a middle/upper class in absolute terms as the U.S.

Being a superpower comes with a lot of baggage.. There are pro's, but most certainly cons. I'd imagine if you asked most Canadians, they wouldn't want Canada to be a superpower even if given a choice. This is why I find it amusing that people make the claim of a so called inferiority complex, when most of us wouldn't want the glory or the burden.

Back to what you said though, Canada hasn't done the best job in retaining the best and brightest when it comes to young people either.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...sier-1.3492851

Last edited by fusion2; 05-21-2016 at 11:19 PM..
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Old 05-21-2016, 11:26 PM
 
22,925 posts, read 14,227,964 times
Reputation: 16962
Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
I don't disagree with you. I disagree with those Canadians who have this mentality that everything evil is American, that Canada can do no wrong, that America offers nothing of value and that Canada is defined by being the perfect version of America. Canada = rainbows, roses, chocolate fountains and peace. America = war, fatsos, lazies, racists, mass violence, Hell.

This is what Americans think of Canadians, by and large:


How Canadians view Americans:


Canadians are humble and friendly. Americans are rude and arrogant. Except the above view shows the exact opposite. The Americans are largely collegiate and positive when describing their neighbor. The Canadians are rude and narrow-minded.

I agree whole-heartedly with this American's perspective:


Everybody hates Americans: My life abroad as the maligned Other - Salon.com
Geez louise if you want to be taken serious please refrain from using crap from Salon.com. Is that your default "to go to" site or what?

Canada named world's most well-respected country by holidaymakers | Daily Mail Online

You keep harping on about how Canadians dislike the U.S. so much and how sites like Salon.com post little youtube snippets to support that meme while at the same time extolling the virtue of your one true ally the U.K. when it would seem by a more respected polling agency that Canadians hold the U.S. in higher regard than the U.K does. In point of fact it would seem Canada has a higher opinion of the U.S. than quite a few other countries, Germany's opinion of you for instance, is tanking. We even like you more than Australia does. No surprise I guess, but even your other neighbour and greatest source of immigration, Mexico, has a lower opinion of you; go figure?

This one's for tongue in cheek value:
https://www.thestar.com/opinion/comm...orld-gwyn.html

This one's the real deal:
1. America

Now would something closer to the truth be that YOU dislike Canada and while this thread started off with a stupid question posed by a non-Canadian, it was the derisive answers from Americans that triggered all this nonsense. You're a super power, we get it, you've got 350 million paying almost 4% of your GDP to sustain a burgeoning military. You freak'n well should be a super-duper power. Now if only you could provide ALL your citizens with affordable healthcare.

Remind me again about how it's 'Canadians disliking America' that lends us an inferiority complex when the reverse would actually seem to be the case. You don't like Canada and we don't shive-a-git, now couldn't you find a nearby hydrant to pizz on.......please?
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Old 05-22-2016, 12:22 AM
 
7,370 posts, read 4,337,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RajputMaster24 View Post
Dear friends, if canada opens up its immigration policy do you think it can become a superpower? It has an abundance of space and natural resources ( I mean the southern half of Canada). What are your thoughts?
Canada has changed so much in the last few decades, and not altogether in better ways. Harper and Trudeau are in favour of opening up the borders to new immigrants. With that immigration comes different values. Harper presumably believed that the government could hold onto historic Canadian values, such as revealing the face when swearing an oath, regardless of immigration. He was wrong. New values introduced by new immigrants can change those values in an instant. Canadians have to roll with it, but I have to question what those values will look like with several million more new immigrants, most of which may be from primarily Muslim countries. How will the face of Canada change? Will European values be over ridden?

If Canada increases it's population with new immigrants, and changes her values, what country will Canada, the superpower, target with her might?
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Old 05-22-2016, 12:27 AM
 
3,700 posts, read 2,868,936 times
Reputation: 1515
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Remind me again about how it's 'Canadians disliking America' that lends us an inferiority complex when the reverse would actually seem to be the case.

Actually the two things can go hand in hand.....I'm not referring to you but is a widely discussed topic that some Canadians have an inferiority complex in some regards towards the US...

Someone in this thread mentioned this US State Department cable

In many ways lacking a strong national identity, Canadians often define themselves simply by stating what they are not -- American. According to one University of Ottawa professor, Canadian identity is based largely on those things Canadians feel they "do better" than the U.S.: e.g., implementing government-run social welfare programs; abiding by moral underpinnings; establishing a harmonious yet multicultural and diverse population; and, peacekeeping rather than peacemaking.

I experienced exactly that many many times, at some point in a conversation the "we are not Americans" will pop out.

I personally know quite few Canadians that would leave for the US if they could, I have not met that many Americans that would love to do the opposite even if is much easier to move to Canada than moving to the US.
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Old 05-22-2016, 12:45 AM
 
7,370 posts, read 4,337,419 times
Reputation: 7675
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
Actually the two things can go hand in hand.....I'm not referring to you but is a widely discussed topic that some Canadians have an inferiority complex in some regards towards the US...

Someone in this thread mentioned this US State Department cable

In many ways lacking a strong national identity, Canadians often define themselves simply by stating what they are not -- American. According to one University of Ottawa professor, Canadian identity is based largely on those things Canadians feel they "do better" than the U.S.: e.g., implementing government-run social welfare programs; abiding by moral underpinnings; establishing a harmonious yet multicultural and diverse population; and, peacekeeping rather than peacemaking.

I experienced exactly that many many times, at some point in a conversation the "we are not Americans" will pop out.

I personally know quite few Canadians that would leave for the US if they could, I have not met that many Americans that would love to do the opposite even if is much easier to move to Canada than moving to the US.
Canadians have no inferiority complex. Canada is full of proud Canadians who are currently debating when to start building the wall.

Has it occurred to you that many Canadians might choose a country other than the US as an alternative, or does this seem like a binary issue?
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Old 05-22-2016, 12:53 AM
 
Location: Toronto
13,704 posts, read 14,002,382 times
Reputation: 4563
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post

Someone in this thread mentioned this US State Department cable

In many ways lacking a strong national identity, Canadians often define themselves simply by stating what they are not -- American. According to one University of Ottawa professor, Canadian identity is based largely on those things Canadians feel they "do better" than the U.S.: e.g., implementing government-run social welfare programs; abiding by moral underpinnings; establishing a harmonious yet multicultural and diverse population; and, peacekeeping rather than peacemaking.

I experienced exactly that many many times, at some point in a conversation the "we are not Americans" will pop out.
I find this a weak argument to support an inferiority complex. I see this as simply a smaller and overall pretty similar nation making a distinction which is in fact correct. There are differences.. A lot of similarities but also differences. The U.S isn't as a much larger nation in the anglo N.A sphere, having to differentiate itself because it is considered 'America'

I also find it curious that in that State Department Cable, they put so much weight on one Professor's view. I'm pretty certain there would be many other so called experts, having a different take on things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
I personally know quite few Canadians that would leave for the US if they could, I have not met that many Americans that would love to do the opposite even if is much easier to move to Canada than moving to the US.
Similar to the above. Smaller but similar nation that borders the largest economy on earth. There is another country that is not very similar that borders the U.S and there's a whole heckuva lot more of them wanting to go to the U.S than Canadians. In all honesty, I really don't know that many Canadians who would leave Canada for the U.S. That isn't due to a feeling of superiority, just a feeling of being content where they live. That said, it shouldn't really be surprising that more Canadians would move to the U.S than vice versa. Logically, if Canada were 9X as populous as the U.S, it would be the same situation but in reverse.
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