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Old 06-12-2016, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Toronto
13,691 posts, read 13,997,148 times
Reputation: 4563

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
You're wasting your typing Fusion.

Manitopiaaa has it all figured out to his liking.
I know Bru - i'm sick though and bored and i'm always typing a billion emails at work so if i'm not out and about doing something and stuck at home nursing a virus, i'm probably typing. its my habit like some smoke..

Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
It's only Canadians that have negative opinions about America while Americans never garner a bad rep anywhere on the planet for their noted arrogance, rudeness, and condescending manner towards any other country. Perusing any boards where the Canadian ~ American interplay is a topic and you'll note any number of scathing remarks about Canada coming from some Americans.

When you read one resorting to that old "inferiority complex" meme it begs the question; where were these young folks spouting this nonsense when I was travelling in the 60's and every American I bumped into overseas was wearing a Canadian flag on his person and pretending to be Canadian. If that wasn't indicative of thinking of one's country of origin inferior to another I don't know what better an indicator there could possibly be.

Imagine my surprise........It's still going on to this day!

Fake Canadians go home - Gadling

Traveling While American - The Atlantic

This part I found humorous: "I have lived in China now for more than three years, and I absolutely do pretend to be Canadian sometimes. I only do it in rare instances when somebody asks me where I’m from, and I don’t know where they’re from (although to be perfectly honest, I often want to tell people I’m from Canada … especially with the rise of Donald Trump). "

Canadians have not found it expedient to fake being American......we've never felt ashamed (inferior) enough to have to.
Speaking of conflicting messages - is the accusation that we have this smug superiority or that we have an inferiority complex? I have a tough time reconciling that. I find that oxymoronic and a bit of a conflicted message. I think some of us have kind of taken on a sense of superiority over some of those stereotypical 'Muricans' we see on the news or on TV. Of course its not nearly as widespread or even as serious as some are making it out to be, but I think in some ways a mechanism for drawing a line in the sand from some of that stuff is actually very important. The funny thing is, many, many Americans do the exact same thing that they accuse us of doing - drawing that line in the sand between themselves and others within their own country so I think there is a bit of a double standard taking place. Some of the biggest critics of GWB's foreign policy for example have been American friends I have and not Canadians, Europeans etc etc. I certainly wouldn't want my country to be made great again Trump style. That is a line in the sand i'm very happy to make as many Americans would be of kindred spirit about. That said, no harm in all of us enjoying Game of Thrones or wolfing down a Mac from time to time - we're all human in this.

What we as Canadians need to do is to continue to improve our own country. Its hard but taking stock in what we are not doing as well as we should be doing is more important than being aware of what the U.S isn't doing right. I'd like to see us move this country forward in the areas that we have kind of been stuck in. Its fine for us to say that we don't want to adopt certain practices from other countries - that is actually important and very healthy, but its also important and healthier that we look more introspectively at how we can make this a better place and not take things for granted. At the same time, there are things other nations are doing better than we are, we should be open minded about these things. We can also create things that don't have a parallel in the world - be it innovative stuff or innovative social policy or innovative political processes that make our land a better one for ourselves.

Back to the U.S/Canada dynamic, Truth is, there are elements both our nations can learn a lot from one another. It would be nice if there were more Yaledef types around. I think they are - the quiet majority on both sides for whom there is largely a huge amount of respect regardless if you come from Alabama, Ontario, Alberta or California.

I don't wear a maple leaf when I travel - I kind of find it a bit tacky tbh - but if i'm asked where i'm from - i'm never ashamed to say i'm from Canada.

Last edited by fusion2; 06-12-2016 at 02:13 AM..
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Old 06-12-2016, 07:07 AM
 
22,925 posts, read 14,223,759 times
Reputation: 16962
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
I know Bru - i'm sick though and bored and i'm always typing a billion emails at work so if i'm not out and about doing something and stuck at home nursing a virus, i'm probably typing. its my habit like some smoke..



Speaking of conflicting messages - is the accusation that we have this smug superiority or that we have an inferiority complex? I have a tough time reconciling that. I find that oxymoronic and a bit of a conflicted message. I think some of us have kind of taken on a sense of superiority over some of those stereotypical 'Muricans' we see on the news or on TV. Of course its not nearly as widespread or even as serious as some are making it out to be, but I think in some ways a mechanism for drawing a line in the sand from some of that stuff is actually very important. The funny thing is, many, many Americans do the exact same thing that they accuse us of doing - drawing that line in the sand between themselves and others within their own country so I think there is a bit of a double standard taking place. Some of the biggest critics of GWB's foreign policy for example have been American friends I have and not Canadians, Europeans etc etc. I certainly wouldn't want my country to be made great again Trump style. That is a line in the sand i'm very happy to make as many Americans would be of kindred spirit about. That said, no harm in all of us enjoying Game of Thrones or wolfing down a Mac from time to time - we're all human in this.

What we as Canadians need to do is to continue to improve our own country. Its hard but taking stock in what we are not doing as well as we should be doing is more important than being aware of what the U.S isn't doing right. I'd like to see us move this country forward in the areas that we have kind of been stuck in. Its fine for us to say that we don't want to adopt certain practices from other countries - that is actually important and very healthy, but its also important and healthier that we look more introspectively at how we can make this a better place and not take things for granted. At the same time, there are things other nations are doing better than we are, we should be open minded about these things. We can also create things that don't have a parallel in the world - be it innovative stuff or innovative social policy or innovative political processes that make our land a better one for ourselves.

Back to the U.S/Canada dynamic, Truth is, there are elements both our nations can learn a lot from one another. It would be nice if there were more Yaledef types around. I think they are - the quiet majority on both sides for whom there is largely a huge amount of respect regardless if you come from Alabama, Ontario, Alberta or California.

I don't wear a maple leaf when I travel - I kind of find it a bit tacky tbh - but if i'm asked where i'm from - i'm never ashamed to say i'm from Canada.
It used to be de-rigueur to wear a maple leaf but it was always with the most casual of travel outfit and usually a back-pack or cap. I wear neither travelling and haven't since the 70's.

You're a reasoned participant in these all too often "poke a hornet's nest threads". I've made great strides during my "nationalism" therapy sessions. I no longer bristle like Walter at one of Jeff Dunham's benign queries when the "typical" happens. Nor do I assume a superior stance like some sumo wrestler stomping his feet one at a time while facing his opponent in the ring.

Now I just grin smugly content in the knowledge we're way more alike than different with no national costume to boast about, no national or even tribal tattooing to set us apart, no driving on the left or drinking warm beer (thank god for that one) that either one of us can readily respond with to claim a higher ground.

We're both as countries only as good as we choose to make them and lately, both groups of citizens are being sorely tested to find a higher common denominator rather than the usual lower bar to set.

My American friends of many years have shown me the 'real deal' and I'm sure the majority of those on here are of the same stripe. Bless their little pea-pick'n hearts.
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Old 06-12-2016, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Toronto
13,691 posts, read 13,997,148 times
Reputation: 4563
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
It used to be de-rigueur to wear a maple leaf but it was always with the most casual of travel outfit and usually a back-pack or cap. I wear neither travelling and haven't since the 70's.

You're a reasoned participant in these all too often "poke a hornet's nest threads". I've made great strides during my "nationalism" therapy sessions. I no longer bristle like Walter at one of Jeff Dunham's benign queries when the "typical" happens. Nor do I assume a superior stance like some sumo wrestler stomping his feet one at a time while facing his opponent in the ring.

Now I just grin smugly content in the knowledge we're way more alike than different with no national costume to boast about, no national or even tribal tattooing to set us apart, no driving on the left or drinking warm beer (thank god for that one) that either one of us can readily respond with to claim a higher ground.

We're both as countries only as good as we choose to make them and lately, both groups of citizens are being sorely tested to find a higher common denominator rather than the usual lower bar to set.

My American friends of many years have shown me the 'real deal' and I'm sure the majority of those on here are of the same stripe. Bless their little pea-pick'n hearts.
lol I think we're all human and anyone who comes in here and engages in trollarama is bound to get a response and you know the type of flame war that ensues. Its easy to get sucked into that We're probably all guilty of it - I know I am and at the end of the day - I confess, i'm human!

What you said as underlined struck a particular chord with me. It will play a big part in how we proceed for the next few generations actually.
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Old 04-27-2022, 06:58 PM
 
18 posts, read 6,682 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Actually, I think this is an excellent post!

I may sound like a broken record but there is an understated importance in just attracting quality people willing to do average or slightly above average jobs. If there is one area where Canada is in need of labour its in the trades! What's wrong with attracting Plumbers/Electricians and Millrights? Not a thing! If I think of where I work, we are always looking for those trades - always!!!



I notice on C v C that many Americans use racial colour as pretty much the only qualifier for diversity. Cultural and ethnic diversity is not as well regarded. To some of our American friends, doesn't matter if you're a Ukrainian or Dutch - you're lumped into the same bag of coal - White. I have a friend from B'dos and it Drives him CRAZY that people assume he is Jamaican just because he is dark skinned and from the Caribbean.
I love how, whenever an American shoots down your points about ethnic diversity, you people STILL continue on with your “Americans only care about race” BS.

It’s almost like you’re resentful of the fact that Canada is tangibly less diverse than the US.
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Old 04-27-2022, 07:07 PM
 
18 posts, read 6,682 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Well suburban Detroit is a lot less dense than Toronto is.
You will say this about every single American city vs every single Canadian city just because Canada has more suburban high rises.

The area around those suburban high rises is heavily lacking compared to the older railroad and small town suburbs that are much more plentiful in the US.

You sit here and fancy yourself as European because you have glassy condo towers surrounded by stroads in your Canadian suburbs, and insult America as being inferior even though it’s visibly and obviously more historic, and it’s suburbs and urban neighborhoods have better walkable commercial main streets, complete with better architectural heritage and preservation and much better landscaping and design of the public realm over all.

Of course the US has newer regions in the sunbelt and out west devoted to sprawl and tract housing and subdivisions, but I’m sorry, to pretend like there isn’t a much larger % of Canadian urban and suburban area taken up by haphazardly built condo towers and endless McMansion/stroad developments, is dishonest.

Alternately, to pretend like the US, a country that underwent urban and suburban development much before Canada did, doesn’t have plenty of economically vibrant cities, college towns and suburban areas with old main streets, is completely dishonest.
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Old 04-27-2022, 07:14 PM
 
18 posts, read 6,682 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
I agree with what you say here. And there is NO comparison between the city of Toronto vs the city of Detroit. Toronto is in a entirely different league.

Yes, suburban Toronto has a lot more life, which is a big plus for Metro Toronto. I'll remind you that I chose to leave Metro Detroit, and I probably would not have stayed there as long as I did if I'd had the choice (I didn't). But, again, if everything else between the two metros were equal, and if someone were forcing me to choose between living in suburban Toronto vs suburban Detroit, I would, ultimately, choose suburban Detroit. Esthetics really matter to me when it comes to the surrounding landscape. Where suburban Detroit is largely built on lush, green swamp land, with lots of protected green spaces, suburban Toronto is largely built on former corn fields, where it seems every inch land must be used.
Where is the life in Toronto’s suburbs? They all look like Mississauga, which is unlively compared to American suburbs
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Old 04-28-2022, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Etobicoke
1,030 posts, read 477,789 times
Reputation: 647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
No.

Canada is a superpower.

Immigrants will not change that status.
I don't think your criteria of 'superpower' is considered mainstream. But I think you are being sarcastic.
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Old 04-28-2022, 10:11 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
30,874 posts, read 42,448,752 times
Reputation: 71480
Canada is already a super power. Canada is simply quiet about it with no sabre rattling. Canada just quietly does her thing and nobody messes with her.
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Old 04-28-2022, 12:01 PM
 
22,925 posts, read 14,223,759 times
Reputation: 16962
Quote:
Originally Posted by trendingtw View Post
I love how, whenever an American shoots down your points about ethnic diversity, you people STILL continue on with your “Americans only care about race” BS.

It’s almost like you’re resentful of the fact that Canada is tangibly less diverse than the US.
So you went searching for a long dead (2016) thread to post that nonsense?

"A key difference between the United States and Canada is the migrant rate. Canada has a 23.2% higher immigration rate than Americans, making our population more culturally diverse."

That desperate to grind a tear-making onion are you?
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Old 05-30-2022, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Toronto
13,691 posts, read 13,997,148 times
Reputation: 4563
Quote:
Originally Posted by trendingtw View Post
You will say this about every single American city vs every single Canadian city just because Canada has more suburban high rises.

The area around those suburban high rises is heavily lacking compared to the older railroad and small town suburbs that are much more plentiful in the US.

You sit here and fancy yourself as European because you have glassy condo towers surrounded by stroads in your Canadian suburbs, and insult America as being inferior even though it’s visibly and obviously more historic, and it’s suburbs and urban neighborhoods have better walkable commercial main streets, complete with better architectural heritage and preservation and much better landscaping and design of the public realm over all.

Of course the US has newer regions in the sunbelt and out west devoted to sprawl and tract housing and subdivisions, but I’m sorry, to pretend like there isn’t a much larger % of Canadian urban and suburban area taken up by haphazardly built condo towers and endless McMansion/stroad developments, is dishonest.

Alternately, to pretend like the US, a country that underwent urban and suburban development much before Canada did, doesn’t have plenty of economically vibrant cities, college towns and suburban areas with old main streets, is completely dishonest.
I feel like I need to get a Lawyer with all these allegations! Fortunately I think I know a resident one around here

You went digging way back with this one. Are you an Archeologist?
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