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Old 02-05-2021, 10:49 PM
 
3,462 posts, read 2,786,747 times
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It’s interesting how Plummer affected a British accent, even though he didn’t go to school there.

 
Old 02-06-2021, 12:58 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,624 posts, read 3,411,405 times
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It's not a British accent; it's a Mid-Atlantic, or Transatlantic accent; and was in vogue for Canadians and Americans who wanted to affect a prestigious accent in the early part of the 20th century. From Wikipedia:

Quote:
The Mid-Atlantic accent, or Transatlantic accent, is a cultivated accent of English blending together features of both American and British English (specifically Received Pronunciation for the latter) that were considered the most prestigious by the early 20th-century American upper class and entertainment industry. It is not a native or regional accent; rather, according to voice and drama professor Dudley Knight, it is an affected set of speech patterns "whose chief quality was that no Americans [or Canadians, for that matter] actually spoke it unless educated to do so". Primarily fashionable in the first half of the 20th century, the accent was embraced in private independent preparatory schools, especially by members of the Northeastern upper class, as well as in schools for film and stage acting. The accent's overall use sharply declined following the Second World War. A similar accent that resulted from different historical processes, Canadian dainty, was also known in Canada in the same era. More recently, the term "mid-Atlantic accent" can also refer to any accent with a perceived mixture of both American and British characteristics.
Christopher Plummer did attend a private English-language high school in Montreal ("the accent was embraced in private independent preparatory schools"), in the early part of the 20th century; and was a Shakespearean actor, where such an accent would certainly help; in addition to other stage and film work. Interestingly, certain Americans learned and spoke the Mid-Atlantic accent as well: William F. Buckley, Jackie Kennedy, FDR and Mrs. Roosevelt, and Gore Vidal, are just some examples.
 
Old 02-24-2021, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,680 posts, read 5,529,153 times
Reputation: 8817
'My butter seems harder': spread sparks furore over Canada's dairy industry

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ustry-palm-oil

Suspect is palm oil.
 
Old 02-24-2021, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
3,973 posts, read 5,770,752 times
Reputation: 4738
Trudeau and Biden just had their first virtual meeting together. Pledges to work together to save the environment and to try to free the two Canadians currently held in China among other things. At least the meeting was cordial says the news reports. Hopefully this will revive the friendly relationship our two countries have had for so long.
 
Old 02-24-2021, 07:58 PM
 
3,462 posts, read 2,786,747 times
Reputation: 4325
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdnirene View Post
'My butter seems harder': spread sparks furore over Canada's dairy industry

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ustry-palm-oil

Suspect is palm oil.
Palm oil is used to make margarine.
 
Old 02-24-2021, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,038,045 times
Reputation: 34871
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdnirene View Post
'My butter seems harder': spread sparks furore over Canada's dairy industry

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ustry-palm-oil

Suspect is palm oil.
The palm oil is an approved and very costly dietary supplement that is only included in the livestock fodder and I don't have a problem with that. It's good for the balanced diets, nutrition, strength and health of the livestock. It doesn't hurt them, and there is no palm oil in the milk that dairy animals produce. The palmitic acid in palm oil helps to boost the palmitic acid that the animals already produce naturally themselves and that in turn helps to increase their natural butterfat production which is also a good thing.

I wish all the people on social media who recently have gotten their knickers in a twist about palm oil and dairy animals would do some independent research and educate themselves properly about the topic before going only by negative hearsay and getting themselves all half-cocked and in an uproar.

https://www.realagriculture.com/2021...omer-feedback/


.
 
Old 02-25-2021, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,555,283 times
Reputation: 11937
I was reading BBC online the other evening and they had an article about this. It contained some blatant falsehoods, and conveniently left out information that would give the story some context. I wish I had taken a screenshot because when I checked it in the morning the article had been changed, with no notations that they had updated it.

In the original they claimed Canadians were in an uproar over this since our tax dollars went to MASSIVELY subsidize the dairy industry and we expect better. For those who don't know, Canada's dairy industry is not subsidized, but is a Supply Management system.

The information they left out was that the UK and the USA also use feed with palm oil.

They removed the falsehood about subsidies, added the fact that the UK and USA use it in their feed.

So it went from what sounded like a rant against the horrors of the Canadian Dairy industry, to a thin story about palm oil in feed.

They quote some Canadian Dairy people in the article, so I suspect they contacted the BBC in regards to corrections and the slant that this was just in Canada.

Just a bit of searching brings up the fact that Australia and New Zealand use it as well, and an article about the Dutch trying to secure sustainable palm oil for their feed supplies.

Last edited by Natnasci; 02-25-2021 at 01:18 PM..
 
Old 02-25-2021, 08:03 PM
 
3,462 posts, read 2,786,747 times
Reputation: 4325
Now “Buttergate” does not bother me.
Does your conscience bother you? Tell the truth!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=truMPkJcXiQ
 
Old 02-26-2021, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,555,283 times
Reputation: 11937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
Now “Buttergate” does not bother me.
Does your conscience bother you? Tell the truth!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=truMPkJcXiQ
The question I have, is IF the feed used is causing butter to have a higher melting point, why are people just noticing it now?

Especially since the industry says they have been using it for over a decade.

It's also used in other countries, why haven't people there noticed something different?
 
Old 02-26-2021, 11:21 AM
 
3,462 posts, read 2,786,747 times
Reputation: 4325
A local supermarket has butter on sale for two dollars a pound.
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