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Old 12-14-2021, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
In Quebec we overwhelmingly spell COLOUR as "COULEUR".
Well, at least there is a " u " in there.
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Old 12-14-2021, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Do you use American spelling in Canada or your own or British? eg I wrote a cheque at the shopping centre for my licence. Or a check at the shopping center for my license. I will practise my piano performance when I go to piano practice. Etc.

Just curious!
I would use the highlighted ones.

Some words that are used in the UK are not used here, like lift for elevator, lorry for truck, or "boot for trunk of a car.

Some UK spellings are also not used here like tyre for tire, or kerb for curb, although a friend from Northern England said he had never used kerb, so perhaps regional.
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Old 12-14-2021, 12:10 PM
 
Location: ottawa, ontario, canada
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debating spelling differences goes a long way to dismiss any notion that Canadians are boring
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Old 12-14-2021, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,722 posts, read 33,893,946 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I would use the highlighted ones.

Some words that are used in the UK are not used here, like lift for elevator, lorry for truck, or "boot for trunk of a car.

Some UK spellings are also not used here like tyre for tire, or kerb for curb, although a friend from Northern England said he had never used kerb, so perhaps regional.
Your English spelling and vocabulary are bang-on Canadian standard.

Even down to the practise (verb) vs. practice (noun) which eludes a lot of people.
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Old 12-15-2021, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,178 posts, read 2,588,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Official Canadian spelling is actually a mix of American and British spelling.

So colour, centre, etc. which is British.

But authorize, categorize, etc. which is American. For some reason it's "analyse" though.
Not necessarily. For example, I'll usually write "analyze" to a client in a letter, when I inform the client of how I'm looking at his or her case. I don't get any complaints.

But yes, Canadian spelling is a mix of American and British, and most Canadians can handle either. I'd suggest that most English speakers anywhere in the world can too. After all, I grew up reading books by British and American authors who used their native spelling. I got to know both, as well as Canadian spelling, so I could do anything as a technical writer (which I was, before becoming a lawyer), and not get called on it--or could I?

I got called on it, a lot. What puzzled me back in those days was when Americans or British subsidiaries complained about how a document that I wrote was spelled. As I implied, I was a technical writer before becoming a lawyer, and I couldn't believe it when our American colleagues and customers complained that I made a spelling error on pages 63, 174, and 302 of a manual, where I wrote "colour," instead of "color," and demanded the manual be rewritten to correct that. Meanwhile, our British colleagues and customers would be complaining about me writing "analyze" and "initialize." Other similar complaints came in from American-English dominated places where we did business (Mexico and Central and South America), and British-English dominated places (South Asia and Europe).

Well, we were a multinational corporation based in Toronto, Canada, so we told the rest of the English-speaking world to just plain deal with how we wrote things; they knew what we meant. Really, it's not that difficult. It's all English after all, and no matter how you spell it, what really matters is how you understand it.
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Old 12-15-2021, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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It might be unbeknownst to most people on here, but for all the talk about Quebec/Canadian French being extremely different from European French, the spelling is basically identical. I am having trouble of thinking of more than 1 word (bistro here vs. bistrot over there) that is spelled differently.

The spelling in La Presse (Montreal) and Le Monde (Paris) is exactly the same. You can't say that at all for the Times of London vs. the New York Times.

In terms of the vocabulary differences (as opposed to spelling) the level of written language compatibility between the two French papers and the two English papers is about the same.
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Old 12-15-2021, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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https://www.amazon.ca/-/fr/Public-Go.../dp/B00CRGLDX8

Sounds bureaucratic as it's published by the government, but I believe that originally it was developed by the Canadian Press, a collective of all of the country's (anglophone) newspapers.
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Old 12-15-2021, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
17,193 posts, read 12,710,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It might be unbeknownst to most people on here, but for all the talk about Quebec/Canadian French being extremely different from European French, the spelling is basically identical. I am having trouble of thinking of more than 1 word (bistro here vs. bistrot over there) that is spelled differently.

The spelling in La Presse (Montreal) and Le Monde (Paris) is exactly the same. You can't say that at all for the Times of London vs. the New York Times.

In terms of the vocabulary differences (as opposed to spelling) the level of written language compatibility between the two French papers and the two English papers is about the same.
Newspapers tend to use the formal version of the a written language.

It's when the informal use of language is used that the differences really show, especially when spoken.

However that is true of all languages I assume.
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Old 12-15-2021, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
78,808 posts, read 72,819,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
"Princess Margaret Cancer Centre" ...

It's happening. You are slowly being assimilated. Look at you, spelling CENTRE
That's how they spell it! LOL, but I chose early on to do that. When I'm here, I spell the Canadian way. Colour, Tumour.
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Old 12-16-2021, 04:30 AM
 
Location: Rome
530 posts, read 491,256 times
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In order to make the Country less boring (it is not, but let’s assume for the sake of argument that it is), I think it would be a sound move for Canadian English to get rid of the Latin alphabet with all its accompanying spelling variations and adopt instead the awesome Inuktitut writing system.

Nunavut would be in favour, I suppose, and maybe some provinces (Quebec? ) as well
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