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Old 09-24-2019, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,112,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Where ever Thanksgiving comes from I am glad we celebrate it. There are few things I enjoy more than a thanks giving dinner. My mouth is watering just thinking about it.

I agree. Well, only 3 more weeks to go for Canadian Thanksgiving. Maybe we should be telling the OP what kinds of foods Canadians eat for Thanksgiving.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Germany
79 posts, read 50,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Regarding the lack of British stuff in Canada vs. American stuff, it's also worth mentioning that a lot of stuff that is considered "American" is British-derived as the US started off as a British colony and has much of its culture things that were originally British than were adapted to varying degrees in the US.


For example, the reference to breakfast. There are lots of similarities between a typical American breakfat and an English breakfast: cooked eggs and meat, some type of potatoes. There isn't really a US/Canada breakfast on the one side, and something completely different and alien that they eat in the UK.
exactly, the reference to breakfast. Canadians and Yankees eat Pancakes with Syrup for breakfast, but British don't. British eat Porridge for breakfast; does this apply to Canadians? I never experienced Englishmen eating potatoes for breakfast, but this wheetabix stuff I recognised very well. Englishman drink tea for breakfast, Canadians are more likely to coffee.

But on the other hand, this Donut and Muffin stuff must have its origin in England; I've seen it there a lot, even Pies. Even some architecture, resp. these clinker buildings, must have been copied from England, although they have them in Northern Germany and in Holland, too. But not these wooden family houses with that porch or verandah; they don't have them in England.

So Sir, which part of Canada do you advice me to visit which hasn't been influenced by the USA? You are living in French Quebec. Could I get along there without having to speak English, just French?
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,363 posts, read 8,433,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I agree. Well, only 3 more weeks to go for Canadian Thanksgiving. Maybe we should be telling the OP what kinds of foods Canadians eat for Thanksgiving.
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Well at my place we always do turkey, roast beef, stuffing, mash potatoes, mashed turnips, lots of gravey, steamed carrots, cranberry sauce and pickled beats. Of course we also have pumpkin and apple pies.

I already had lunch but I am getting hungry again.

Last edited by UrbanLuis; 09-24-2019 at 02:13 PM..
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,112,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
You guys too.


I live in Texas. y'all is definitely not Canadian. Y'all = you. All y'all = you + the people around you
That's true. Like I said before y'all is British English language in origin (not American English) and it was brought to North America by immigrants from what is now the UK.

I don't understand why so many of y'all are making such a kerfuffle about y'all. The south may have adopted it but they don't own it and they aren't the only people that use it. Sheesh. One could almost think I'd commit some kind of sacrilege.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Germany
79 posts, read 50,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I agree. Well, only 3 more weeks to go for Canadian Thanksgiving. Maybe we should be telling the OP what kinds of foods Canadians eat for Thanksgiving.
.
We do have Thanksgiving in Germany, too. But it's not a big holiday like in North America, though. There are some harvest foods (grains and bread) being placed around the altar in churches, not a big issue.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,091,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biezer View Post
We do have Thanksgiving in Germany, too. But it's not a big holiday like in North America, though. There are some harvest foods (grains and bread) being placed around the altar in churches, not a big issue.
Canadian Thanksgiving (in October, about the harvest) is very different from U.S. Thanksgiving (in November, about the Pilgrims).
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Germany
79 posts, read 50,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Well at my plave we always do turkey, roast beef, stuffing, mash potatoes, mashed turnips, lots of gravey, steamed carrots, cranberry sauce and pickled beats. Of course we also have pumpkin and apple pies.

I already had lunch but I am getting hungry again.
By the way, mushed potatoes might come from Germany; my mother made them very often, and she had no ties to North America; she doesn't even speak English at all. Meat Loaf comes from Germany, it's the German Hackbraten (Roast of chopped meat).
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,129,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biezer View Post
We do have Thanksgiving in Germany, too. But it's not a big holiday like in North America, though. There are some harvest foods (grains and bread) being placed around the altar in churches, not a big issue.
It's not nearly as big a deal in Canada as it is in the US, though bigger here than in Europe I am pretty sure.


Canadian students who have gone away to university often come home for the first time since September during that weekend.


Generally speaking, if you have family in the region where you live you will get together for a meal. But out-of-town family members in Canada do not generally travel long distances to come home for Thanksgiving.


In this sense it is different from the U.S. where many travel very long distances and as a family occasion it rivals Christmas.


In Canada that's not the case and Christmas is still number one by far for family get-togethers.


The first time I was in the U.S. during Thanksgiving, I kept wondering what the big deal was about. I've also been in the U.S. during Christmas - that is much less of a culture shock.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,129,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biezer View Post
exactly, the reference to breakfast. Canadians and Yankees eat Pancakes with Syrup for breakfast, but British don't. British eat Porridge for breakfast; does this apply to Canadians? I never experienced Englishmen eating potatoes for breakfast, but this wheetabix stuff I recognised very well. Englishman drink tea for breakfast, Canadians are more likely to coffee.
Oh, I did say there were differences. Obviously there would be some. I think all of these things are available on either side of the Atlantic Ocean. Porridge is reasonably common in (North) America at breakfast. More at home than in restaurants. And I am pretty sure potatoes of some type is quite common in a traditional English breakfast.


Even between Canada and the US there are some differences. If you ask for breakfast sausage in the US even in a real restaurant you'll get a flat thing like you get at McDonald's. Almost like a hamburger patty. In Canada breakfast sausages are real sausages - that look like wieners. (Though they're not hot dogs.)


I learned pretty quickly that in the U.S. if you want that you have to ask for "sausage links".
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,112,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biezer View Post


exactly, the reference to breakfast. Canadians and Yankees eat Pancakes with Syrup for breakfast, but British don't. British eat Porridge for breakfast; does this apply to Canadians? I never experienced Englishmen eating potatoes for breakfast, but this wheetabix stuff I recognised very well. Englishman drink tea for breakfast, Canadians are more likely to coffee. .............

Englishmen will eat potatoes with a breakfast that they traditionally call bangers and mash - the bangers are sausages and the mash is potatoes. It's often accompanied by peas and onions with gravy.

Canadian breakfasts are varied - they might be eggs and meats cooked in various styles together with a choice of toasted bread, toasted crumpets, English toasted muffins, croissants, bagels or biscuits with jam or cheese, and choices of bacon, sausages, ham slices, beef steak and sometimes pan fried trout and hash browns; rolled stuffed French crepes, English pancakes or Belgian waffles or French toast with Canadian maple syrup or jam/marmalade sometimes together with fruits; hot oatmeal porridge, cornmeal porridge, wheat porridge, or a variety of dry processed cold cereals made from grains; a variety of sandwiches, often grilled sandwiches; fruits and fruit juices, smoothies, milk, coffee, tea. And sometimes left overs from last night's supper. There are other things Canadians eat for breakfasts but I'm not going to name them all.


.
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