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Old 10-08-2021, 03:34 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,631 posts, read 3,426,237 times
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Thought you all might find this documentary I stumbled across interesting. The Canadian host goes to Korea, along with a couple of Korean war vets from Canada, and visits the battlefields they fought on:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TH7oJyCnDtM

Korea is called "The Forgotten War," and many Canadians forget, or don't know, that we actually fought in that conflict. This documentary brings it home.
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Old 10-08-2021, 07:31 AM
 
22,923 posts, read 15,521,794 times
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Oh man Chevy; you've started a thread about one of my favourite topics. Spending as much time travelling as we USED to before this covid beasty came along, it always amazed me whenever discussions of the two Koreas came up how many had no idea the pivotal role Canadian, Australian and New Zealand troops played in the establishment of the actual DMZ that remains to this very day.

Some really heroic events by those three were were more than merely instrumental to that 38th parallel remaining the line in the dirt separating the two halves over there.

The Battle of Kapyong was the stuff of the best war movie ever but, yet to be made by anyone. Canadian movie makers really need to get their heads out of their collective arses (Paul Gross are you listening?) and get their act together to feed a market desperately needing address.
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Old 10-09-2021, 02:09 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,631 posts, read 3,426,237 times
Reputation: 5592
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Oh man Chevy; you've started a thread about one of my favourite topics. Spending as much time travelling as we USED to before this covid beasty came along, it always amazed me whenever discussions of the two Koreas came up how many had no idea the pivotal role Canadian, Australian and New Zealand troops played in the establishment of the actual DMZ that remains to this very day.
Indeed, Bru. I think many Americans would be surprised to know that it wasn't just an ROK/USA initiative against the North Koreans and Chinese; rather it was a UN initiative, and a number of countries, Canada among them, participated. It appears that as part of the UN force, Canada still has armed forces personnel there, even if it's only a few. From this Canadian government "Defence Relations" site:

Quote:
The United Nations Command (UNC) Military Armistice Commission, headquartered in Seoul and Panmunjom is responsible for supervising the 244 kilometre-long Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) under the authority of the Armistice Agreement signed between North and South Korea on 27 July 1953. The Armistice Agreement remains the UN's longest running Peacekeeping Mission. Canada contributes one senior officer (Colonel or Navy Captain, as Canadian Defence Attaché) and one Sergeant (the Canadian Defence Assistant Attaché) as a Liaison Team to the UNC and participates in Guard Post inspections, investigations of cease-fire violations and other events and ceremonies including Repatriation of War Remains from North Korea. There are a number of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) officers embedded with the UNC in South Korea and with the UNC (Rear) in Japan.
So, not many Canadian troops--only two at the DMZ--but we're still there. As I'm sure there are a few other non-US, non-ROK, United Nations troops from UN members who took part in the 1950s conflict. But likely very few.

As an aside, the producers of the TV show "MASH" did do their homework, knew that it was a UN action, and occasionally featured the doctors of the 4077th treating patients from other armed forces: Greek, British, and in one episode, Canadian. Problem here was that in the MASH episode, the Canadian army was bringing wounded Canadian infantry into the 4077th in a Canadian army truck. Okay fine, but when the truck arrived, there was an RCAF squadron badge on the truck's door. Oops!

Agree with you about Kapyong. Now that would be an exciting war picture! Heck, the 2nd Bn, Princess Pats got a US Presidential Unit Citation from Harry Truman for their action there.
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