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Old 04-26-2022, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
3,427 posts, read 4,770,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seaboarded View Post
I'd love to hear people thoughts who have lived in both places. Canadian or American. I am looking to leave NYC to work/live remotely somewhere in the Northeast but am thinking of widening my options to Canada because why not? I'm considering Burlington, Portland, and maybe the White Mountains. Looking for a larger town or city. Visited Montreal a decade ago. Loved it. Don't know Quebec City at all. I speak French (like actually speak it, like I have a degree in it). I want easy access to the outdoors which I don't think is really too hard anywhere in the entire region.

Oh, and also, what are Quebecois like?? Sorry for such an ignorantly American question but I've never really had an understanding of what Canada is all about. I could say with relative confidence, since I've lived in France and Spain, that the French are culturally proud, a little self-righteous, sometimes dismissive toward Americans and Anglos and the Spanish are funny, playful, EASY to get along with, and don't hold work and making money as the holy grail of all things.

Canada? Just a blank spot in my mind. Like a lot of Americans we kind of forget it's there.

Well, I'm a New Englander who has lived in cities big and small so I can tell you a bit about life in a New England city. Do you want a slower quieter pace than NYC? If yes then Burlington and Portland are great choices. You're in a smaller city but also within close distance of the mountains, forests, beaches, and Canada if you're that interested. There are many other small cities and large towns to consider, Brattleboro, VT, Concord or Manchester, NH are a few others. You're not coming from a warm part of the US like Florida so you won't experience that much culture shock here. As for Canada, my question to you is why so? It's not as if you can waltz into another country and live there like that. Canada recently enacted a 2 year ban on foreigners purchasing property so if you had hopes to buy a house, that just went out the door at least for now. You have experience living abroad so be sure to check on requirements for living in Canada as a foreign national.

Still if you're looking for a smaller, slower pace of lifestyle than NYC, then Montreal (and Boston for that matter) ought to be ruled out because even though no city is as fast paced as the Big Apple, those two are no slouches either. I'd probably recommend Sherbrooke, Magog, or even Cornwall, Ontario for your size of city and English/French balance.
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Old 04-27-2022, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,733 posts, read 33,949,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post

Still if you're looking for a smaller, slower pace of lifestyle than NYC, then Montreal (and Boston for that matter) ought to be ruled out because even though no city is as fast paced as the Big Apple, those two are no slouches either. I'd probably recommend Sherbrooke, Magog, or even Cornwall, Ontario for your size of city and English/French balance.
Yes, Montreal most definitely has a big city vibe and pace.

Quebec City (alluded to by the OP) is similar to Providence RI maybe in terms of size, though the urban structure and culture (at least in the inner city) is more dense and traditional. Dare I say... "European".

Cornwall, ON does have a francophone community (25-30% of the population) but in my experience the francophone cultural element there is quite subdued.

Sherbrooke is a pretty attractive city. Fairly laid back. Very predominantly francophone but with a decent touch of anglo.
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Old 04-27-2022, 08:28 AM
 
143 posts, read 99,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
As for Canada, my question to you is why so?
Exactly. He seems to be looking for a city of a minimum size; there's only one in Northern New England (Burlington).

I love my NH neck of the woods but it's a place of little towns and countryside. The Vermont side is just as rural. All my "larger city" needs are met in Sherbrooke; I'll have to go to Southern NH for stuff maybe once a year. (Typically saplings from the state nursery in the Concord area. Things I can't bring over the border.)

As others have said, "I'm from NYC and want to live in a smaller city" isn't very specific. Maybe your ideal size is Boston or Montreal. Every single square inch of both New England and Canada qualifies as "a place that a relocating New Yorker will find to be more quiet" :P

I think there's nothing you can't find on the U.S. side of the border. As you said yourself, Burlington and Portland are likely (what I'm feeling are) your best options. Cheaper than Boston, yet still decently sized. Unless you really WANT to move to a small town. (The main reason would be that it's soooo much cheaper. Personally I know I'd rather own in a small town and work remotely (and commute more), than rent in a larger city.)
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Old 04-27-2022, 08:33 AM
 
143 posts, read 99,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Sherbrooke is a pretty attractive city. Fairly laid back. Very predominantly francophone but with a decent touch of anglo.
Soon to be at least slightly less attractive architecturally if the mayoress doesn't give me what I want, I'm about to turn a few buildings from the 1800s into surface parkings, at least three of which are on the city's main street in downtown (so, really visible). :P

Just venting, but not kidding.
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Old 06-12-2022, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Boonies
2,187 posts, read 3,244,786 times
Reputation: 2978
I'm an American but many of my relatives were from Canada. I love Canada and especially Quebec. I like how meticulous Canadians can be. I'm so happy Covid has slowed down because I cannot wait to go visit Old Quebec City, Nova Scotia, PEI, there's just so much to see in Canada. Someday, I would like to visit Vancouver.

My grandfather and uncles never gave up their citizenship from Canada, but they loved America too.
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