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Old 02-14-2024, 08:08 PM
pdw pdw started this thread
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
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https://theconversation.com/the-priv...housing-222351

Article from Monday about this. I’m optimistic enough talk about this will get the federal party leaders talking about this. It has been done before, we can do it again. It doesn’t have to start as some gigantic plan. We can target areas with the lowest rental vacancy rates first and create competition in the market. Trudeau can be pressured by the NDP to pursue this. Olivia Chow is doing great work in Toronto and Eby, premier of BC is having similar proposals.
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Old 02-14-2024, 10:47 PM
 
1,229 posts, read 505,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Don't be blinded to what should be obvious. In Vancouver the many homeless aren't all homeless because of higher cost of housing. It's because it's the west coast.

The reason why Vancouver has so many homeless people is because 80+% of them are NOT British Columbians. They were already homeless Canadian people from other provinces in Canada who have migrated to live homeless in Vancouver in spite of the higher prices.
Interesting. More than 80% of homeless are from outside BC? That's a really high number. Where did you get that number from?
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Old 02-15-2024, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
Interesting. More than 80% of homeless are from outside BC? That's a really high number. Where did you get that number from?
It comes from surveys. Every province does them. Yes it's high. And it's not just a really high number, it's a really, really, really high number because BC's total number of homeless is a really, really, really, really, really, really high number because of Canadian migrant homeless who by comparison on a per capita basis outnumber the homeless populations who elected to remain in their own provinces.

Surely all of the homed people in Canada - if they even thought of it - didn't actually think that all of BC's high homeless population were native BC'ers who were once responsible hard-working people who unwillingly became homeless because they lost jobs and couldn't afford the cost of living or couldn't afford to pay their rent or buy a home? That would be naive to think that.

The vast majority of these homeless here are single, drug/alcohol addicted and/or mentally ill, irresponsible, lazy and aimless high school drop outs and drifters come from all locations across the nation looking for a warmer way of being homeless. They're lumped together in solidarity on the west coast just like all the many thousands of homeless in Los Angeles who have arrived there in LA from all across America.

These ones here in BC are mostly those who have never held an honest part time job let alone a full time job in their lives, because they're not capable because of their addictions or mental illness. Dependent on good will, have never paid a dime of rent or utility money in their lives for anything out of their own pocket, never moved away from their provinces until their parents kicked them out of their bedrooms in their parents' homes. The very idea that these are all native BC'ers who can't afford the cost of living in BC is laughable. How do non-BC'ers think these homeless people got here and are living, if that's the case, hmmm? Because it is undeniable they are here and are surviving here, even though they aren't from here.

I wonder how non-BC'ers think that homed, native born and grown BC'ers are managing to survive if they aren't all wealthy?

.
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Old 02-15-2024, 11:18 AM
 
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Thank you for sharing. The highest number i could find was 45% which is still quite high. I don't think anyone has said or suggested that all the homeless people in vancouver were local but over 80% seems incredibly high. It is not a secret vancouver has the highest real estate prices in the country. Many Canadians are having a hard time keeping up right across the country even in places with more reasonable/sane rental rates.


Quote:
Exclusive: More than 100,000 B.C. households at risk of homelessness due to rental crisis


“The rental crisis is worse (in B.C.) than pretty much anywhere else in the country.”

The average rent in B.C. increased 30 per cent from 2016 to 2021 — the largest increase of any province — making B.C. one of the country’s most unaffordable place for renters to live, according to a new analysis.
https://vancouversun.com/news/local-...-risk-homeless


Quote:
Many homeless people in Vancouver have job


ANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – One of the key findings in a new report out this week on the homeless rate in Vancouver may surprise you. It turns out some people staying in shelters are actually employed.

In many cases, Jeremy Hunka with the Union Gospel Mission says, those people are having to work longer to save up just to get into the out of control housing and rental market in the city.


“The cost of housing is so high and the crunch of housing is so high that people are barely hanging on and even if they are working hard, even if they have a break and they have a good job they are still struggling.”

He describes it as a vicious cycle as the working poor put in long hours but can’t leave the shelter on stable ground.


“There is this stigma and stereotype around people who are on the streets. Often people look at them and may comment haphazardly that they’re lazy, might think wrongly they’re not working hard but really there are a lot of people in our shelter who are actively trying, actively working, doing whatever they can to turn their life around. It’s tough out there. And this [employment] stat in the Homeless Count really shows that people are having to work even harder than they used to, to stay off the streets,” he adds
https://vancouver.citynews.ca/2016/0...ver-have-jobs/

Last edited by Luisito80; 02-15-2024 at 11:36 AM..
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Old 02-15-2024, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Saskatoon - Saskatchewan, Canada
827 posts, read 867,106 times
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Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
What???

Montreal is not nearly as bad as other places. And this with Montreal arguably being the best city in the country. Quebec city is even lower.
Montreal is doing great. I was expecting the rents would be much more expensive there. It's still expensive but not that bad compared to the chaotic situation in other Canadian big cities. The rents there are below the national average, which is impressive being Canada's second largest city. Probably it's still possible to find 1bdr for under $1,500 and 2bdr for under $2,000 somewhere in Montreal.
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Old 02-15-2024, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post

..... It is not a secret vancouver has the highest real estate prices in the country. Many Canadians are having a hard time keeping up right across the country even in places with more reasonable/sane rental rates.
That's certainly true. The reason for the high real estate prices (and the inordinate number of homeless) is because of Vancouver's highly desirable geographical location and climate. The entire lower mainland - that is to say, the extreme south-west corner of the province including the southern half of Vancouver Island - is the warmest and mildest climate in all of Canada and its natural, stunning beauty and setting is enviable around the world. How could it not be so highly desirable by any standards of any people anywhere?

Personally I think the reason why the real estate prices have always been so high here is so that only wealthy people who can afford them will buy them. I think that's been done in order to prevent degradation and ruin and slums, to keep out most of the all manner of "unwashed riff-raff poor" from coming from other places who would otherwise flood into the region if RE prices were a lot cheaper to take a slice of BC's best pie for themselves - or to keep out foreign profiteers and slum lords from taking advantage and profiting from it while living in their own foreign countries.

And I'm not being a snob to say that, just being practical and recognizing the reality of it and I approve of it because otherwise I think it would all be utterly destroyed and I do not want to see it get destroyed. As for myself I'm just another low scale middle class old person who has lived and worked honestly in BC all my life and am retired now on my pension and living in one of the many non-profit or very low-profit affordable housing complexes that DO exist in the province. I can't afford to live high on the hog by luxury standards and I have to be very frugal but at least I am keeping my little slice of pie that I worked for, I have everything that I actually need, I do not live in Vancouver (thank god, because I detest ALL big cities) but I'm still in my little bit of heaven in the lower mainland and I'm happy with my lot in life. I'd be happier still if all those homeless people would go back home where they came from and make an effort to get a real life for themselves.

.
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Old 02-15-2024, 01:31 PM
 
1,229 posts, read 505,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
That's certainly true. The reason for the high real estate prices (and the inordinate number of homeless) is because of Vancouver's highly desirable geographical location and climate. The entire lower mainland - that is to say, the extreme south-west corner of the province including the southern half of Vancouver Island - is the warmest and mildest climate in all of Canada and its natural, stunning beauty and setting is enviable around the world. How could it not be so highly desirable by any standards of any people anywhere?

Personally I think the reason why the real estate prices have always been so high here is so that only wealthy people who can afford them will buy them. I think that's been done in order to prevent degradation and ruin and slums, to keep out most of the all manner of "unwashed riff-raff poor" from coming from other places who would otherwise flood into the region if RE prices were a lot cheaper to take a slice of BC's best pie for themselves - or to keep out foreign profiteers and slum lords from taking advantage and profiting from it while living in their own foreign countries.

[b]
And I'm not being a snob to say that, just being practical and recognizing the reality of it and
[/B]I approve of it because otherwise I think it would all be utterly destroyed and I do not want to see it get destroyed.
What about middle class vancouverites though? Or vancouverites that aspire to be middle class and live the Canadian dream? Where does your analysis leave them?

Last edited by Luisito80; 02-15-2024 at 01:42 PM..
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Old 02-15-2024, 01:52 PM
pdw pdw started this thread
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,677 posts, read 3,099,404 times
Reputation: 1821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
It comes from surveys. Every province does them. Yes it's high. And it's not just a really high number, it's a really, really, really high number because BC's total number of homeless is a really, really, really, really, really, really high number because of Canadian migrant homeless who by comparison on a per capita basis outnumber the homeless populations who elected to remain in their own provinces.

Surely all of the homed people in Canada - if they even thought of it - didn't actually think that all of BC's high homeless population were native BC'ers who were once responsible hard-working people who unwillingly became homeless because they lost jobs and couldn't afford the cost of living or couldn't afford to pay their rent or buy a home? That would be naive to think that.

The vast majority of these homeless here are single, drug/alcohol addicted and/or mentally ill, irresponsible, lazy and aimless high school drop outs and drifters come from all locations across the nation looking for a warmer way of being homeless. They're lumped together in solidarity on the west coast just like all the many thousands of homeless in Los Angeles who have arrived there in LA from all across America.

These ones here in BC are mostly those who have never held an honest part time job let alone a full time job in their lives, because they're not capable because of their addictions or mental illness. Dependent on good will, have never paid a dime of rent or utility money in their lives for anything out of their own pocket, never moved away from their provinces until their parents kicked them out of their bedrooms in their parents' homes. The very idea that these are all native BC'ers who can't afford the cost of living in BC is laughable. How do non-BC'ers think these homeless people got here and are living, if that's the case, hmmm? Because it is undeniable they are here and are surviving here, even though they aren't from here.

I wonder how non-BC'ers think that homed, native born and grown BC'ers are managing to survive if they aren't all wealthy?

.
Grandfathered in asset inflation from home owning parents
If your family owns a home with enough equity/appreciation to fund the homes of their children, the kids will be all right. If not, you’re being crushed economically. There’s no path to ownership short of winning the lottery; doing massively well in the stock market or living rent free in your parents basement for over a decade while you save every dollar for a down payment. I’m not convinced there’s any private market way out of this. Profitability in home building and affordability for families are mutually exclusive in this country.
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Old 02-15-2024, 02:40 PM
 
1,229 posts, read 505,410 times
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Originally Posted by EduardoFinatto View Post
Montreal is doing great. I was expecting the rents would be much more expensive there. It's still expensive but not that bad compared to the chaotic situation in other Canadian big cities. The rents there are below the national average, which is impressive being Canada's second largest city. Probably it's still possible to find 1bdr for under $1,500 and 2bdr for under $2,000 somewhere in Montreal.
Yes Montreal is doing many things well. We see this not only in home prices . The cost of day care is the lowest in the country, taking a huge burden of working class families. The cost of secondary education is lower than other provinces. The best public transportation in the country and bike infrastructure in the country. Instead of focusing on elitist " woke" issues imported from elsehwere, Montreal actually focuses on working everyday people.
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Old 02-15-2024, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,062,349 times
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Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
What about middle class vancouverites though? Or vancouverites that aspire to be middle class and live the Canadian dream? Where does your analysis leave them?
I don't understand that comment. What is the Canadian dream? Please define what it is.

The October 2023 population of the City of Vancouver (not Metro Vancouver) was 662,248. The majority of Vancouver city residents are middle class income people, approximately 53%. That percentage is not including those lower percentages that are low income class (9.5%), upper middle class (+/- 34.2% approximately), and very wealthy upper class (3.3%).

39% of the city's population are single people living in single person residences.

The population of all 22 cities in the entire Greater Vancouver Regional District is 2,683,000. That is just a little under half of the total population of the whole province, which was 5,581,127 in October 2023. Likewise, the greater majority of those in the whole GVRD are middle class to upper middle class.

That is not counting the populations of the dairy and farming agricultural industry reserve cities that are in the Fraser Valley Region, which is also part of the lower mainland.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 02-15-2024 at 03:07 PM..
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