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Old 04-14-2024, 12:52 AM
 
6,048 posts, read 5,972,945 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Well, when Canada decriminalized cannabis it was said that it would eliminate most of the illegal cannabis market. It may have cut it down but it's far from dead.

Drug problems in general have become a lot worse in Canada in recent years, but not sure that is directly related to cannabis decriminalization.
Well it has been suggested that the recriminalization of cannabis back in about 2008 Western Australia , simply turned cartels away from cannabis and towards Ice. (methamphetamine) We became and remain the meth capital of Australia. Mind blowing to what degree. Over $2 Billion worth was consumed back in 16. Must be far more now, but hard to qualify the dollar figure. There are only 2 and a half million in the whole state.


Thing being with meth, it that while it requires initial expense, in the setting up of labs, but then it is quick to make and easy and hard to detect.

Surely decriminalizing this drug, that plays havoc on society, but at least getting it out of the hands of the cartels, would be better than what is happening now?

Australia has the higher recreational drug use in the world. War on drugs long lost here. As someone said to me, there first needs to be a wiliness. Our position next to Asia, leaves us wide open to the massive drug problem of that continent.
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Old 04-14-2024, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,086,303 times
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The Portuguese approach to decriminalization of hard drugs is often cited in Canada. This has partly inspired what BC has done with the exception that it has not been accompanied by extensive support programs for addicts as in Portugal.

Needless to say I have no confidence that further decriminalization of harder and harder drugs is going to follow the Portuguese pattern in Canada. It will only lead to a new larger victim class of addicts.

So far in BC the results have been disastrous for both addicts and wider society.
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Old 04-14-2024, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,086,303 times
Reputation: 11652
The Portuguese approach to decriminalization of hard drugs is often cited in Canada. This has partly inspired what BC has done with the exception that it has not been accompanied by extensive support programs for addicts as in Portugal.

Needless to say I have no confidence that further decriminalization of harder and harder drugs is going to follow the Portuguese pattern in Canada. It will only lead to a new larger victim class of addicts.

So far in BC the results have been disastrous for both addicts and wider society.
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Old 04-14-2024, 01:06 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 511,977 times
Reputation: 766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post

Needless to say I have no confidence that further decriminalization of harder and harder drugs is going to follow the Portuguese pattern in Canada. It will only lead to a new larger victim class of addicts.

So far in BC the results have been disastrous for both addicts and wider society.
We are already seeing that. Pretty hard for anyone to defend it at this point.
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Old 04-14-2024, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,086,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
We are already seeing that. Pretty hard for anyone to defend it at this point.
But for some reason certain people want to push us even further deeper down the hole.
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Old 04-23-2024, 10:43 AM
 
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Decriminlization has been misguided compassion that actually lead to more people dieing. One other negative result of decriminalization of hard drugs has been many public spaces got taken over by junkies. Seems like people are sick of it. This video is from 3 days ago.



This video from today. Decriminalization project has simply not worked. It has lead to more overdoses, drug addicts taking over playgronds and leaving needles on the ground where children play.
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Old 04-27-2024, 07:38 PM
 
1,243 posts, read 511,977 times
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When being woke back fires. Related to the videos above. What the hell did they think would happen? That junkies would be more discrete and considerate of others now that they have a freedom to do drugs openly?
Quote:
B.C. government asks Health Canada to 'urgently' make drug use in public illegal again
The province had tried to make drug use illegal in public places with its own legislation, but a B.C. Supreme Court judge put in place an injunction preventing that.



VANCOUVER — British Columbia is preparing to ban most public drug use, a change to parts of its decriminalization pilot project that the premier says should have been in place all along.

The province has made an “urgent” request to Health Canada to make amendments to B.C.’s exemption under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to give police the power to step in when they see illicit drug use in public spaces, including inside hospitals, on transit and in parks.
https://nationalpost.com/news/canada...d%20in%20parks.

Last edited by Luisito80; 04-27-2024 at 07:49 PM..
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Old 04-29-2024, 09:11 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,686 posts, read 3,103,160 times
Reputation: 1832
Not all drugs are equal, no but also not all drug users are equal either. If you have lived in an urban or urban adjacent area for any significant amount of time, you’d be surprised at how many functioning members of society do cocaine regularly. Kitchen staff, construction workers, bankers, a ton of people. It’s big in the hockey community as well. It’s not going to necessarily trigger someone to commit crimes or make a scene in public. That’s more related to mental health issues. Someone with a risk for schizophrenia could smoke one marijuana joint and end up in a permanent state of psychosis and need to be institutionalized, they don’t necessarily need to be doing “hard” drugs. Meanwhile, how many people who grew up in the hippie era took LSD at concerts and the like? Or gen X taking ecstasy at raves in the 90s? Let people have their fun, I say. Puritanical approaches are not going to solve anything. We just need to improve access to mental health support in this country, that is what will solve a lot of these problems.
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Old 04-29-2024, 09:25 AM
 
1,243 posts, read 511,977 times
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[quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
Not all drugs are equal, no but also not all drug users are equal either. If you have lived in an urban or urban adjacent area for any significant amount of time, you’d be surprised at how many functioning members of society do cocaine regularly. Kitchen staff, construction workers, bankers, a ton of people. It’s big in the hockey community as well. It’s not going to necessarily trigger someone to commit crimes or make a scene in public. That’s more related to mental health issues.
This is false. Drugs like crack and meth are known to make people act out. It is not a simple matter of them just having poor mental health. Hard drugs can tale a healthy person and destroy their mind.





Quote:
Someone with a risk for schizophrenia could smoke one marijuana joint and end up in a permanent state of psychosis and need to be institutionalized, they don’t necessarily need to be doing “hard” drugs.
This happens rarely and happens to people that are already prone to mental health problems. It's not marijuana smokers making a scene in public spaces. This was actually a terrible comparison.



Quote:
Meanwhile, how many people who grew up in the hippie era took LSD at concerts and the like? Or gen X taking ecstasy at raves in the 90s? Let people have their fun, I say. Puritanical approaches are not going to solve anything. We just need to improve access to mental health support in this country, that is what will solve a lot of these problems.
Let them have their fun? Their fun is killing them and causing problem for everyone else. You are clearly clueless about the differences between drugs. You said not all drugs are the same yet want to compare people doing meth and fentanyl to hippes doing lsd or ravers doing xctasy?? This is even worse than your comment about men in womens locker rooms.

Marijuana users don't leave needles in playgrounds. Meth and heroin users do, potentially spreading HIV and hepatitis.


Quote:
West Van dad voices concern over needles found in school playground
The needles were found near an elementary school as debate rages about the province's plan to restrict drug use in more public spaces
https://www.nsnews.com/local-news/we...ground-7647072
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Old 04-30-2024, 07:53 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,686 posts, read 3,103,160 times
Reputation: 1832
https://www.nationalobserver.com/202...riminalization
Quote:
"People cannot afford housing anymore," she said. "This is a housing issue, not a decriminalization issue."
Bingo! Drug problems aren’t some new thing. In the 80s it was crack, the early 2000s meth now it’s fentanyl that is in the midst of an epidemic. The thing was, you used to be able to work a job as a janitor or burger flipper and be able to have a place to live on that income. Now people are earning six figure salaries and spending almost half of it just to rent a room in an apartment with roommates. When you’re homeless, of course the drug use is going to occur in public. Safe injection sites are one way to get this reduced on the streets, and also getting serious about affordable housing. Eby is one of the only premiers actually cooperating with the feds on a housing plan. Most premiers just want to point the finger at the feds, when they have a much better jurisdiction and authority to enact change at their level of government. I get people with young kids may not have compassion for homeless drug addicts, but the idea that we should send the cops in and just throw everyone with drugs on them in jail is insane to me. Reminds me of third world approaches from places like the Philippines and China.
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