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Old 05-11-2024, 11:05 AM
 
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A lot of those youtubers are Mexicans that over stayed their tourist visas.
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Old 05-11-2024, 11:46 AM
 
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I can only speak for Toronto, but we don't have many Mexicans. Most of the Central or South Americans I know here are from Brazil or occasionally places like Guatemala and El Salvador.

What makes Toronto particularly attractive to immigrants is that there are already massive communities from a certain background. More recently it applies to Somalians, Indians (especially Punjabi), Chinese, Jamaicans, and Koreans further back it was the Italians, Jewish, Greek and Portuguese. Unlike cities like Chicago or LA there isn't really a Mexican area and population that encourages further immigration.

It why I sort of laugh when I saw someone on here or reddit bashing Toronto's food scene relative to American restaurants because of the Mexican food. There are good Mexican restaurants, but if you are coming from a major American city, in 99% of cases their Mexican food scene will blow ours out of the water, whereas Toronto's specialties are probably in things like Chinese, and Indian food (plus a ton of other things).

I do agree that the Mexican population in Canada I would assume tends to either come from a wealthier background and/or is more highly educated. If you are a low skilled worker, and you already are in the United States, there is very limited incentive to come to one of Canada's major cities. Toronto and Van are both very expensive cities by NA standards, and there is a limited at best supporting community. If you get to places like San Diego, LA, Austin, Houston, San Antonio or even Chicago there is a lot more going in their favor (whether it's community, cost, etc.).
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Old 05-13-2024, 08:04 PM
 
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According the 2021 census, the Hispanic/Latino population actually shrunk a in a few places. For example Latinos now make up a smaller percentage of Montreal than they used to.
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Old 05-15-2024, 12:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luisito80 View Post
That's doubtful. Even in Canadas big cities it is rare to hear Spanish or to see Latinos walking around.
3% isn't that high, but it probably is believeable; there are also some Spaniard Canadians as well who may be selfidentifying as Latino more nowadays; Canadian actors of Hispanic descent, as well as musicians, are becoming more in the limelight now too.

Hopefully I don't sound too nosy asking this, I am not Canadian, but I have fam and friends who are... do you travel through Canada much, may I ask? I think in BC and Alberta, there is a fairly semi-decent Hispanic community there, and also in the Prairies now too. Ontario, excluding Leamington and Toronto and maybe Kitchener-Waterloo, there are few if any Latinos. There are almost no Latinos in the countryside. In BC and Alberta, rural towns, and Brandon, Manitoba, there are a lot more Latinos.

Rural Latinos are rare in Eastern Canada, and city/suburban Latinos are somewhat common in eastern Canada, and Latinos are somewhat common in some western Canadian cities excl. Victoria and maybe Edmonton, and are also somewhat common in a good chunk of the rural towns too.

Hispanics are fairly dispersed in western Canada, while Latinos are mainly to be found in the cities of east Canada.

Aside from the aforementioned Brandon, there are kind of lot in the Langley, BC area, which isn't rural, but there are quite a few workers and businesses owned and leased by Latinos nearby Abbotsford; Latin food trucks are common alongside the route.

Okanagan Valley, some areas have a lot. Some areas of Vancouver Island have a lot, maybe twice higher proportion-wise than Victoria at most.

A lot in Brooks, Alberta.

Sask, not too many honestly, but Manitoba has a lot of Mexicans and Salvadorans. Does Sask have a Latin community much?

Quote:
Even the Black population in Canada is susrprisingly big, the bulk having come in the last few decades. UNlike the US Canada has very few old Black communities and the few that do exist are very small. It's actually nothing short of a miracle canada Has as many Black folks as it does, which is a much bigger % than Latin Americans.
Ok true.

Quote:
Low compared to what you see in the US. Extremely high for Canadian stadards. Canada follows immigration standards more comparable to the UK or Australia. Our demographics overall are more similar to the UK and Australia than they are to the US. This is why when people try to make toronto/nyc (or any other canadian/american cities) comparisons it is ridiculous. Blacks and Hisapnics together make up more than half of NYC.
Yes, however, UK does not have many Latinos either. Even less than Canada, for mostly-obvious reasons. Also, UK doesn't really have many Asians as in East Asians; South Asians yes, but Filipinos, Chinese, Viet, Thai, Korean, not more than 2% if you lump them up together.
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Old 05-15-2024, 02:06 PM
 
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I am Latino myself. Grew up in Nova Scotia. Very very few Latinos out there. Moved to Montreal, lived there for a about a decade. There is a small but vibrant latino community there.

I lived in Parkdale toronto for a while, there are some Latinos in toronto, but very few compared to other ethnic groups they are hardly noticable there. You are more likely to hear Cambodian, Swahili or Turkish on the streets of Toronto than Spanish. Latinos live scattered through out the city. Can't really speak about Vancouver but it seems to have been a favorite place for illegal Mexicans, that over stay their tourist visas. Mostly single young people, very few families. I doubt Latinos make up significant number of people in Vancouver.

I have been through alberta didn't see many latinos. Currently live in Manitoba, Latinos are not really noticable here. There are actually more noticable in small towns like Brandon. Like was said earlier they are brought in to work in the meat packing industry and farming. Mostly Colombians, Mexicans and Salvadoreans.

You are not being nosy my friend, this is a discussion board you can ask/say what you ike?

Quick personal story, When My family first moved to Canada we lived in a rural area. When I say rural i mean this was in the middle of no where. Not too visible minorities around. There was us and one Asian family that ran a resutarant in town. Also, In the area we lived in there was actually one Chicano guy living there with his American wife. He had been living there since the early 70s. I was told he was a draft dodger of the vietnam war but don't know for sure how or why he got there. He heard my Mother speaking spanish to me and started talking to us, we were both very surprised to meet a Spanish speaker in those parts. Even when I think back on it now it seems kind of crazy. When we moved to Halifax, the guy that used to cut my hair was Puerto Rican. He was cool as hell, I miss him. One of two puerto ricans I ever met here in Canada. He had been living there also since the 60s or 70s. Both Chicanos and Puerto Ricans are rare species here in Canada but the first Latinos i ever met were these two guys.
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Old 05-16-2024, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Elsewhere
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Originally Posted by TheAsianContagion View Post
As an American with Canadian relatives, I still find it shocking how low Canada's Hispanic population is: 1.5%, or some sources say it grew to 2-3%, but still, when I visited in mid-2010s, it was only 1-1.5%. My whole life in California half the people I know are Mexican and it still blows my mind very few move to Canada.

Some say it's too cold... ok, why does Chicago have such a big Hispanic population? And Detroit too, and Milwaukee? Too far? Why do so many Filipinos live in Toronto, who are so physically removed from said metropolis.

Some say it is because Mexicans have their anchor in the US and have little reason to go to other countries. Odds are, I've heard, and cannot confirm, that Mexicans and Latinos who move to Canada are either people who want something new and are most likely US-born, not Mexican or Latin American-born, and/or are probably wealthier compared to most Mexican and Hispanic immigrants in the US.

Surrey, BC seems to have a Hispanic population, and Leamington/Windsor, Ontario area, and parts of Toronto and Montreal too (prob. because French is a little more closer to Spanish than English, and Quebec/French culture seems sorta more aligned with Hispanic culture), and a few here and there on Vancouver Island and Edmonton, but not much else. My Edmonton friend said he has never met any Hispanics outside of barber shops and Mexican restaurants, but he isn't the most social, but still... wow!

But as for more rural provinces like Nova Scotia and Sask... my friends/acquaintances said they have never met any Mexicans... not joking. They may have met a Venezuelan in a class or something but that is just... wow. Canada is not even that far from MX.

Is it growing in CAN now? The community? Is the Mexican food good in some parts of CAN now?
Just throwing some historical information into the mix. In 1981, a friend and I visited another friend in Dallas, someone who I only knew from upstate New York who had moved to Texas, where her mother had come from. She lived in an apartment complex with a working-class population, and it was an eye-opener in terms of the openly-stated racism against black people--not the term they used--but also a lot of disparaging remarks about "wetbacks". We had no idea what or who they were talking about. It turned out they meant Mexicans, and they went on and on about how much they hated them.

We were from New Jersey. We didn't yet know any Mexicans. As far as Spanish-speaking populations go, New Jersey had the second-largest Cuban community in the United States, and there were many Puerto Ricans in New York City, some of whom in the next generation had begun moving to the Jersey burbs, but Mexicans were not on our radar whatsoever.

Sometime between the late 1980s and the early 1990s--and I always connect this with the time that suburban people in my area stopped cutting and raking their own lawns and started hiring landscapers to do that for them with the noisy leaf blowers--Mexicans did start appearing in the NY/NJ metro area. The Mexican population grew quickly, finding jobs in service industries, evidenced by the now-old joke that "they" won't get deported because then who will do the cooking in New Jersey's Italian restaurants? The ability of non-Hispanic chefs to learn "Kitchen Spanish" came out of these encounters.

My point is that you are asking about Canada, but I'm on the east coast/middle Atlantic states, and Mexicans are relatively new immigrants to this part of the United States, established only in the last thirty years. Now, two miles from where I am sitting typing this, there is a rather large Mexican community on the less-affluent side of a very affluent town now known for some kickass Mexican restaurants, a Mexican bakery, and so forth. Mexicans are also seen everywhere doing landscaping and other service jobs. Thirty years ago, that neighborhood was African-American.

The answer may well be that immigrants go to places when there is a need for work that they can fulfill. They just haven't made their way to Canada yet.

Sidebar story that always amused me. About 15 years ago or so, the office where I worked was near a very good Italian restaurant in NYC, popular for groups of us to go to for celebratory lunches. One of the regular waiters was a young Mexican guy with only the trace of an accent, so probably born here or came here very young. I noticed one day he wore a claddagh ring and remarked on it, and he said his Irish fiance had given it to him when they got engaged. It was such a New York moment. Only in Manhattan can you be served Italian food by a Mexican guy wearing an Irish claddagh ring! But maybe someday in Toronto...
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Old 05-16-2024, 08:08 PM
 
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The article below is a bit old, from 2022 October 30. The Americas made up 11.53% of immigrants to BC in 2016 - 2022.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...ease-1.6634389

Just 2 days ago, at a Chinese restaurant, there were two tables next to us, and they were speaking Spanish.
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Old 05-16-2024, 09:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orbiter View Post
The article below is a bit old, from 2022 October 30. The Americas made up 11.53% of immigrants to BC in 2016 - 2022.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/briti...ease-1.6634389

Just 2 days ago, at a Chinese restaurant, there were two tables next to us, and they were speaking Spanish.
That number will go down now that Mexicans can no longer enter the country on without tourist visa. The chart on there is also wrong, it has Mexico on there as Central America. Mexico is not part of Central America, it should be under north America.

Last edited by Luisito80; 05-16-2024 at 09:30 PM..
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Old 05-17-2024, 10:29 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
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I’d imagine Jamaica, Guyana and Haiti would be the top countries in the Americas for people coming to Canada, and I don’t think they would self identify as Hispanic or Latin American. Maybe the immigration from those places is more so in the past rather than the last few years though. My perception is skewed based on where I live.
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Old 05-17-2024, 11:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I’d imagine Jamaica, Guyana and Haiti would be the top countries in the Americas for people coming to Canada, and I don’t think they would self identify as Hispanic or Latin American. Maybe the immigration from those places is more so in the past rather than the last few years though. My perception is skewed based on where I live.
If you're talking about the chart posted above it was only for BC. I doubt there are many caribbean people going there at all. Specially not Haitians. In the Eastern part of the country that would be correct.
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