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Old 05-16-2024, 06:27 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,706 posts, read 3,121,635 times
Reputation: 1847

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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
But speaking of Steinbach, this is a place just outside Steinbach at 300k https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...-steinbach-r16

Here's one in Morden https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...eet-morden-r35

Here's one in Brandon https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...randon-trinity

(I would search further but I have a scared German shepherd crawling in my lap. Thunderstorm.)
I agree netwit that on an individual level it makes sense to move across the country to a less expensive location for many people. If I wasn’t tied down where I live, I’d consider it. Every time I’ve been to Manitoba I’ve loved it, and it’s a very beautiful place with an amazing music scene, culturally diverse and friendly people. This housing crisis is eating away at the country like a cancer though. The same arguments for Manitoba being affordable used to be said about Nova Scotia, Calgary and PEI but that is no longer the case in those areas. Something drastic needs to change policy wise at every level of government to get us out of this mess. Think about this, there’s probably 5-10 million young people in Ontario and BC that can’t afford a place to live outside their parents house. Would the Manitoba you and I love not change drastically if they all decided to move there? I don’t think housing would stay affordable for long.
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Old 05-16-2024, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Saskatoon - Saskatchewan, Canada
835 posts, read 872,552 times
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It’s true that people are reluctant to live in small towns, but the problem keeps being the housing shortage.

Imagine if people leave big cities and move to small towns. With no new houses being built to accommodate the new inhabitants, prices would explode and the same problem would just keep happening in a different location. If new homes were built in small towns and more homes became vacant in the big cities because of the population loss, prices would drop. But the primary reason for that would be the end of the housing shortage. More new housing could also be built in the big cities where people are actually wanting to live.
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Old 05-16-2024, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,866 posts, read 10,550,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I'm seeing rents at $1200-1600 in my area. There are still older, small houses for sale under $300,000 in my closest city but you really have to look. Houses on acreages outside the city would be 350,000 minimum and for that price you would have an older, smaller home.

In my area, with Manitoba Agriculture not wanting to lose cropland to urbanization, acreages are scarcer and valuable.

However, along the border, say in the Emerson area, houses are available for $200,000. I think I've even seen less. Here's a place for just over $200,000. https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...-e-tolstoi-r17 And here's a house for just under $100,000 https://www.realtor.ca/real-estate/2...et-emerson-r17

But you would have to take your job with you because you won't find one there.

I recently had a couple of people come intio my office who had moved from Toronto. They didn't like big city life. They were immigrants from Africa who wanted jobs so badly they were prepared to walk for an interview to an even smaller town to what is a 30 minute car ride away. And they only arrived this week. The word "gumption" comes to mind.
It's easier for newcomers who are already uprooted to move wherever is most financially advantageous. For Canadians who are part of communities, families and local cultures leaving all that behind for the promise of cheaper housing is difficult for the majority.
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Old 05-16-2024, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,694 posts, read 5,562,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
It's easier for newcomers who are already uprooted to move wherever is most financially advantageous. For Canadians who are part of communities, families and local cultures leaving all that behind for the promise of cheaper housing is difficult for the majority.
It also depends what stage of life you are at. I left Winnipeg straight out of university for a job in Montreal. I viewed the move as an adventure, not permanent. My worldly possessions followed me by rail in the form of a single trunk. So it was an easy move. I rented a furnished apartment the first year. I struck up new friendships from my job.
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Old 05-16-2024, 09:27 PM
 
1,284 posts, read 538,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I agree netwit that on an individual level it makes sense to move across the country to a less expensive location for many people.
Makes sense for new comers. It's actually sad people are being priced out of their hometowns though. That's really pathetic Canada is at that point now.
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Old 05-16-2024, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
2,354 posts, read 1,563,853 times
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I think Canada is also having a pushback against the levels of immigration, as we are. The government have committed to slashing the student visas but the tertiary sector are up in arms about it.

Do you also have the situation that most young people buying their first home need very substantial cash from their parents or grandparents? This situation, of course, fractures society as it increases inequality.
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Old 05-17-2024, 07:09 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,706 posts, read 3,121,635 times
Reputation: 1847
Immigration is getting a lot of pushback right now. I don’t blame it entirely for the housing issue but it definitely creates a lot of demand. Tying housing to immigration just seems like common sense, but personally I’d rather see us build as much housing as we can and tie immigration numbers to that rather than that continue on the path we’re on with construction slowing down because of higher interest rates. Even if we stop immigration, though, housing will stay expensive unless there’s huge investment in non-market rentals. Right now, vacancy rates are low for rentals and there’s no competition for landlords to push rents downwards so everyone is charging the absolutely maximum they possibly can.

Yes, Marisa you’d probably need $200-300k from your parents to buy a small condo in Ontario or BC right now, even if you yourself are earning over $100k a year which is pretty high income. Dual income doctors, lawyers, engineers can probably do it on their own but they won’t be able to buy detached houses, more so 2 bedroom condos in better locations or small townhouse condos, which will cost around $800k.
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Old 05-17-2024, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Taos NM
5,373 posts, read 5,178,703 times
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Oh geez... Sounds like the housing crunch is everywhere, not just the big cities!

To that, I have to ask, what the heck is wrong?? Canada has the most advantages to building homes out of ANY country on planet earth. Literally nowhere else on this planet has an easier environment and resources available to just go build, anywhere you want (that's not like still permafrost or a hunk of granite). It's wildly more difficult to build houses and infrastructure in somewhere like Southern China or Vietnam that has basically no flat ground and every piece of land is already intensively used. That's the type of places you'd expect to see a housing crisis.

Immigrants can be construction laborers, that's how it was in the US in the 2000s. The majority of people on any construction site were immigrants from Mexico or Central America, and they were sure throwing up houses back then.

There must be something seriously screwed up with policy environment in Canada, that's the only reason this can be the case.
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Old 05-17-2024, 08:34 AM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
2,706 posts, read 3,121,635 times
Reputation: 1847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
Oh geez... Sounds like the housing crunch is everywhere, not just the big cities!

To that, I have to ask, what the heck is wrong?? Canada has the most advantages to building homes out of ANY country on planet earth. Literally nowhere else on this planet has an easier environment and resources available to just go build, anywhere you want (that's not like still permafrost or a hunk of granite). It's wildly more difficult to build houses and infrastructure in somewhere like Southern China or Vietnam that has basically no flat ground and every piece of land is already intensively used. That's the type of places you'd expect to see a housing crisis.

Immigrants can be construction laborers, that's how it was in the US in the 2000s. The majority of people on any construction site were immigrants from Mexico or Central America, and they were sure throwing up houses back then.

There must be something seriously screwed up with policy environment in Canada, that's the only reason this can be the case.
Combination of over regulation for zoning/getting permits and underregulation for speculators/flippers getting access to financing. Mortgage fraud is rampant and almost a prerequisite in the Toronto area right now. A lot of overleveraged people but there’s no “walk away” option like in the US so people are on the hook for those mortgages no matter what. In Ontario at least, almost all populated areas are incorporated into large municipalities that have a huge set of rules to follow and a gridlock when it comes to approvals. Every old neighbourhood is filled with old fourplexes, simplexes, walk ups that blend right into the detached neighbourhoods but if you want to build an identical property right next to one that already exists, the city says “no”. All you can do is tear down a smaller 1 storey house and build a bigger 2 storey one on the same lot.
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Old 05-17-2024, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,323 posts, read 9,370,366 times
Reputation: 9860
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
I think Canada is also having a pushback against the levels of immigration, as we are. The government have committed to slashing the student visas but the tertiary sector are up in arms about it.

Do you also have the situation that most young people buying their first home need very substantial cash from their parents or grandparents? This situation, of course, fractures society as it increases inequality.
I personally don't know of any young people needing a handout from their parents. Among my nieces and nephews, they lived with their parents while single and attending university. As single people it was convenient for them. But of those that married, all but one bought a house within a year or two of the marriage.

My single nephews who live in Winnipeg have not yet bought a house, nor do they have a partner they live with.
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